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heidih

eG Foodblog: heidih (2011) - A slice of life in the South Bay of Los A

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We did not pick up anything on this trip. Mexican was calling. Gotta remember that CaliP was in a Mexican food wasteland up in Canada for quite a while :biggrin:

Catching up on my eG reading today. Boy, you really know how to hurt a girl! :raz:

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One of the things that I stumbled upon a few years ago was that I could go to my favorite Mexican place and get just a large order of tortilla chips "to go". I love making my own salsa, but frying the chips is not on the horizon. I am ending the blog tonight, but tomorrow the plan is to make guacamole with the ginormous avocado I showed early on as well as some homemade salsa, and dip them up with chips before a nice pho dinner with my son.

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I was close to a favorite chip place today- the rest of their food is Americanized Mexican, but the chips are freshly fried, light and crisp. I snagged a few as I was driving around on the rest of the adventure. The last shot is of their original location.

The restaurant

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Esp. because I'm constantly buying food (mostly vegetables) and enjoying THEN thinking of what I can make with them..I hope I haven't mischaracterised your cooking but I really love seeing how the produce around you inspires you to cook!

No you are correct- I absolutely have been a market driven cook lately. I hope to channel your main dish salad making in our upcoming summer.

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I got to Chantilly the local but well known Japanese bakery around 4pm - big mistake as the lovely Julia Roberts said in some movie.

The item as described in the click on their name is a cream puff with a blacks sesame filling and a honey drizzle plus more. I had one last year and it was lovely but I still prefer the pastries of my childhood. They were sold out!!!

The storefront

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The okonomyaki place next door ( a delicious cook your own carb fest)

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The line and ads

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Despite life throwing a few curve balls I got down to the Vietnamese market. There was one closer to me but it closed maybe two years ago. It was small but had lots of prepared foods including the unusual (to the Western palate) dessert cups with coconut, corn, beans and other textural and slightly sweet elements. The market I went to today - Dat Moi - has evolved in recent years to embrace the local Caribbean community. The countermen and cashiers are all Vietnamese but as one approaches the weekend the customer base becomes more Island with the entrancing lilt of speech.

Out front

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Banana display

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Canned coconut milk aisle

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ginger beer

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Island hot sauces Jam hot.JPG

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Part of the fresh noodle and soy aisle

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herbs

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pickled products

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bit more produce

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The hot area is seafood. The customers are chatting about it and jockeying for position - no take a number system here.

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Salted dry fish and a conch warning

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And a shot of Pierogi's new scissors on sale for $14.99 today only and 10 % going to the charity :)

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WAY cool Heidi ! Thank you again. I need to make a Cookin' Stuff pilgrimage soon. It's been too long since I've dropped significant coin there, and I *have* dropped significant coin there. More than once :shock:

And oh, that Red Onion ! If I only had a nickle for every Margarita I've had there over the years (and at the El Torito on Hawthorne & Lomita....). Yikes...what memories.

Thanks for a glance at your life, and your kitchen. And of course the scissors. It's been great fun.

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Some roots I can not place - way bigger than a yucca

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They sell Jamaican meat pies. I got a beef one. A short crust colored with annato and filled with a very finely ground meat mixture that is herbal and spicy.

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Offal and other odd parts are in the mix as well

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I picked up the rice crackers I mentioned earlier that have dried shrimp and hot pepper

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Last post of the blog for me.

The idea for dinner was to make a crispy crunchy baguette with the no knead dough I mixed up at the beginning of the week and turn it into a sort of banh mi sandwich.

The very soft dough on parchment and ready to rest and rise

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Baked

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I decided to keep it simple with the cucumber marinated earlier in the week and some red onion quick pickled today. I had carrot and daikon radish but was not in the mood

onion\

I made up sandwiches with a smear of the mushroom liverwurst from Alpine Village on one side, mayo & Sriracha on the other, thin slices of the pork from yesterday plus the cucumber and onion pickle. The bread was sliced lengthwise. Completely forgot to add cilantro - but it was wonderful. Crunchy, meaty, garlicy, sweet/sour.spicy - a great end to a long day.

Thanks for following along.

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Thanks Heidh - it has been a great week reading your blog and getting a peak at life in your part of the world!

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I've really enjoyed reading, Heidi! I was traveling so I didn't get a chance to comment too much, but I always stopped to catch up with what you were doing. Thank you for sharing!!

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I too have enjoyed this so much. Sad to say, it looks as if I won't be buying or tasting conch anytime soon at those

prices. If I could get a pound, I'd jump at the chance in the hopes that I would love it. Your week stirred up a

lot of happy memories for me. Thank You.

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Thank you for a blog of such wonderfully vibrant food! I'm jealous of your citrus trees and your sunshine :smile:

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This has been a terrific blog, Heidi.

The photos and your descriptions are so vivid that I am considering a trek down that way for a shopping expedition.

I've a friend who lives "between the freeways" in Carson and has been inviting me to visit for some time. (Another basenji owner - non foodie.)

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Thank you, Heidi! It's been a wonderful week to follow. I make that carrot and daikon pickle, but I'm inspired to branch out. :smile:

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Wonderful blog, Heidi! Reading this is a great way to spend my Mother's Day! And, Happy Mother's Day to you and all the Moms on egullet.

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Just want to add my thanks for your efforts on behalf on the egullet community.

That last sandwich sounded devine.

Reading your blog and others from SoCal I am reminded of the blessing of many cultures living close to each other. Everyone gets new stuff to eat constantly. And no doubt future fusion chefs are cutting their teeth there on a busy Mothers Day.

Hope the guac is good!

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many thanks, heidih, for the tour of my old stomping grounds! memories of annie's, and (OMG!) the red onion brought smiles and good memories. great glimpse into your food life. cheers!

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Thank you all for your kind words. It feels good to share the bounty of the area.

The guacamole is indeed good as is the salsa. The big avo yielded this generous bowlful. Both dips have been enjoyed with the still fresh tasting tortilla chips from yesterday. I am off to stroll in the Botanic Gardens and then enjoy some pho with my son. Happy Mothers Day to all the moms :smile:

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I too have enjoyed another part of the world, even if it's only on the other coast. After our long dark winter this was a treat.

I will try that sandwich with the roast pork left over from Mother's Day. Pickled things, fresh bread and pork, sounds good.

Thanks for your blog.

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I too have enjoyed another part of the world, even if it's only on the other coast. ...

I've enjoyed it, too. And hey, I'm only on the other side of LA (Ventura) :laugh:!

The guacamole-run to a restaurant for fresh fried chips brings back very tasty memories of my UCLA days! One of the post-docs in the lab had an avocado tree and used to bring in grocery bags full. The rest of us would supply the other ingredients and gather in the conf room for the communal chopping and mashing necessary to produce a most excellent guacamole in a big old punch bowl. When it was just about ready, we'd take up a cash collection and send someone out to the nearest Mexican restaurant for fresh, hot chips. Mmmmm Mmmmm!

Thanks again for blogging!

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The first teaser shot showed iced tea in a vintage pitcher so I thought I would address my iced tea. It is my all day beverage. Several years ago I picked up a brewing method from a friend that is simple and works for me. I nuke a cup of water in a pyrex measuring cup and then add 4 to 6 tea bags, depending on the type. Today I used 3 bags of the Safeway brand black tea and 2 of Bigelow Perfect Peach. I let it steep for a few minutes, again depending on the tea, pour into the pitcher and fill with water from the tap. As summer approaches I will have different flavors going in pitchers. Anyone an iced tea fiend?

All day, every day. In the summer when there are lots of berries, I cook berries, water and sugar into a thin syrup, strain it, and keep it in the fridge. A half-cup of it gives iced tea a wonderful flavor. I also use a lot of the mint growing on my back porch.

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Heidi, thanks for sharing a slice of your culinary life with us. Your fabulous pictures of the markets, citrus and gardens, produce, weather and more have made me very envious. It was fun being with you this week -- thanks again!

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