Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

heidih

eG Foodblog: heidih (2011) - A slice of life in the South Bay of Los A

Recommended Posts

It's been fun reading this. Although I grew up around Westwood, I do teach occasionally as an adjunct instructor in CA at LA Harbor college. One of the things I love about SoCal is that there is always somewhere else to explore and something new to eat :D

Then the taco truck is just down the street from you at PCH and Vermont :biggrin:

Have you been to Carniceria Flores aka Flores meats on Anaheim by the 110? great burritos, very flavorful and in-expensive!

La Epanola just down the way as well. Lots of great food in the area

That is why I called this area an embarrassment of riches - I have not even dipped the edge of my big toe into its wealth.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I thought it would be more informative to review the items in segments rather than just presenting them on a platter.

First up are the salads - potato, sauerkraut and meat

The potato salad was boring. Just a light oil and vinegar with waxy potato and a hint of parsley. It might make a foil for a spicy or rich sausage, but can not stand on its own. I did bring it to just above room temp in the hopes that would help, but no.

The sauerkraut is not zingy at all. Tastes almost cooked.

The meat salad which is made from a variety of their soft charcuterie like mortadella and bologna along with sour pickle relish and a mayo/cream sauce is pure comfort. It is lovely on a slice of the egg bread.

DSCN0856.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As a note the dried sausage that I showed in the pictures of purchases was not purchased today - it was part of my son's Easter basket from the grandparents. The "wiener" in the package in that same shot is made from veal I think (very light colored and textured) and the casing has an incredible snap. I have frozen it for a future treat- it is a comfort thing for me just barely poached and then dipped in spicy mustard. More often then not the casing pops and splits along its length.

Next up on the plate are the Hungarian headcheese, Bier wurst and Buendnerfleisch. I rarely select head cheese as an option but this was surprisingly good. Thinly sliced the texture was well integrated, the paprika flavor just a flavoring versus a hot spice element, and the gelatinous nature subdued. The Buendnerfleisch is an air dried beef. It was very thinly sliced and a close up sniff gave me a slightly smoky intense yet sweet hit. The Bierwurst does not match the Wiki description. It was a bit garlicky and had more texture than a bologna or mortadella but was quite mild but flavorful. The bread slice is the Farmers Bread which is a rye sourdough.

DSCN0859.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The last plate was Oldenburger salami and the mushroom liverwurst with the egg bread. I prefer a more sour salami but was seduced by the shape- it is tied such that the slices come out in a modified daisy pattern. The liverwurst is lovely - not too strong, very smooth and the mushroom bits are bold enough to taste but not overpower. It also freezes well. This is one of the few items I could not get a small amount of- 1/2 lb minimum.

DSCN0861.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am thankful that I committed to doing something with the tangerines today because when I picked them I saw that they were indeed starting to dry up a bit on the tree. I got about a cup of juice to freeze in cubes and started some peel to dry. I have to find a good cool dry spot for the peel. The pith was a bit thick so I shaved off a good portion of it.

tangerine.JPG

juice.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good morning. Things have cooled off here and it is a pleasant change. The plan today is a trip to the Korean market for pork butt and assorted panchan and kimchi. I'm thinking that pork butt in the Weber kettle would be a treat.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Iced tea update: I found this box of fruit teas in the cupboard. Yesterday was black cherry and today is mixed berry. I find the flavor just this side of too artificial tasting, though it says "natural flavors" on the packet. Well chilled they are refreshing.

tea.JPG

I wanted to show you my kitchen scissors. I love them. The brand is Messermeister and they some apart for easy cleaning. We have discussed the handiness of kitchen scissors . I use them most often to snip herbs into dishes, cut pizza, and of course to get crab and lobster out of the shell.

DSCN0872.JPG

DSCN0874.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just tossed one of the tangerine juice ice cubes from yesterday into my iced tea - excellent. I will be squeezing more juice.

Off to light the fire in the Weber.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What I love in particular about the local Korean market is the shoppers' enthusiasm. I get caught up in the excitement. The shots I took were today, Friday, at 2pm. It was busy but not quite the zoo of the weekends. The sample ladies were already out - I guess they do a three day stint for the weekend.

The market and ads at the entry

outside.JPG

ads.JPG

The first impression walking in- the blur is really what it feels like :smile:ntry.JPG

You enter the market and are funneled into the produce section. On weekends it is a shopping cart traffic jam. Baskets are piled to overflowing with unfathomable amounts of vegetables and large boxes of seasonal fruit.

produce1.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

More produce

produce2.JPG

Garlic scapes and fresh garlic

garlic scapes.JPG

Peeled garlic

garlic.JPG

Small abalone in a tank abalone.JPG

Salmon heads for 69 cents a pound

salmon.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I sampled a selection of dumplings and then some jellies from the sample ladies. I had never had the jellies - she had acorn, mung bean, buckwheat and another I have forgotten. I'd seen photos and thought they would be chewy but they had a pleasant slightly sweet grain taste and the texture was not really gelatinous - hard to describe. Of course anything dipped in the sauce would be good. It was a standard soy sauce, sesame oil, hot pepper paste style dip with lots of toasted sesame seeds floating in it

jelly.JPG

I managed to get a shot of part of the kimchi wall before the camera died

kimchi.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is what I purchased

I went there planning on pork butt. I have never gone there and not seen pork butt. So if course today.....there was no pork butt. I picked up some pork neck bones just in case before I headed to another local market that often has it.

meat.JPG

In the produce section I picked up some sesame (actually perilla) leaves to wrap the meat in when eating, some Korean radish (thicker around than daikon and shorter), and some ginger

green.JPG

I did not get a shot of the panchan section. There must be 50 different varieties. I picked up young radish kimchi, seaweed, playcondon, and what they label as seasoned vermicelli but equates to chap jae without beef (but with meaty cloud ears)

panchan.JPG

I have a lovely red rice cooker that has been well used and which I dragged with me to my current location despite having no room or need for it. I do not cook or entertain for large groups anymore. So....if I want some rice as I will with the pork today and the Korean sides, I buy this precooked rice.

cooker.JPG

rice.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I then ventured to the chain market which often has pork butt- nope - they only had "cushion" which is much less fatty. It is from under the shoulder. I got a small piece and decided to try some of the pork neck bones and this cushion in the Weber. I also grabbed some pasilla/ancho chiles - I could smell the sweet deep spice through the bag.

shoulder.JPG

pasilla.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I started a fire in the Weber off to the side and made a paste for the meat. Processed lots of garlic (the pre peeled is not that pungent), some fresh oregano from the garden, few T of salt, lots of pepper, and the last 5 kumquats from my little new tree and coated the meat. Now I have to be patient for a few hours.

Weber.JPG

FP.JPG

meat.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is a slightly oddly lit shot of my two favorite snacks that sit on top of the fridge:

Unsalted but well roasted pistachios and Calbee shrimp crackers with wasabi. Anyone else a fan?

snacks.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is a slightly oddly lit shot of my two favorite snacks that sit on top of the fridge:

Unsalted but well roasted pistachios and Calbee shrimp crackers with wasabi. Anyone else a fan?

Yes; I also like the Calbee Snapea Crisps.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Life intervened and the coals were done before the meat. The neck bones were almost there and I enjoyed a few. The rest and the larger pork piece were covered with foil and went into a low oven. For dinner I had the chap jae, various panchan, along with some of the perilla leaves and rice. A great mix of flavors. I have been picking bits off the rest as it crisps and gets tender.

DSCN0902.JPG

DSCN0906.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Heidi, where did you find those Messermeister scissors? I have an el-cheapo pair of Chicago Cutlery ones that I can't remember where I got....maybe Tar-jay several eons ago?? It was a set of 2, and the last pair finally wants to give up the ghost. I noticed the other day the handle has split from one too many trips through the dishwasher. They come apart like yours, and that's what I want to replace them with.

But I can't find anything comparable. And I know both Alton Brown and America's Test Kitchen liked the Messermeister. They seem to be the only current option that pulls apart for cleaning. But no one local to me has them !

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Heidi, I've just checked back into your blog after a week of being mostly offline, and am blown away by the sheer deliciousness of the things you make! I really love your cooking style; it speaks to me.

Esp. because I'm constantly buying food (mostly vegetables) and enjoying THEN thinking of what I can make with them..I hope I haven't mischaracterised your cooking but I really love seeing how the produce around you inspires you to cook!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good morning. Misty and 60 at 10 am with a cloudy day predicted to peak at 67. I love it.

The Weber has been cleaned. I like having it ready for the next use. I used to be one of those people who just let the crud burn off the next time I used it. The grills and kettle itself did not hold up that well. I also keep this one in the garden shed so it should be with me for life.

A word about sweets. I grew up with incredible baked goods. The common way to socialize with relatives and other people who emigrated from my mom's village was to go visit them for "coffee". The coffee was garden variety percolated brew. The home baked goods were the focus. Usually at least three different items. The baking can best be described as very Austrian in style. They cobbled together Hungarian, Polish, German and Austrian, relying heavily on the booklets put out by Dr. Oetker and the exchange of recipes was a big deal - always with attribution to the woman who refined it.

So basically I am completely spoiled and picky. I recently went on a road trip with a friend who insisted that we had to stop at bakery as their bear claws were swoonworthy. I love almond paste and buttery flaky doughs. I politely had a few bites; swooning - not even close. I have mom's recipe collection and bake from it for holidays, but am not a regular baker and do not generally seek out interesting baked goods. I do, however, love the writing and respect the opinions of Jonathan Gold. Today I plan to visit a Japanese bakery that has a cream puff he put on a recent list of 100 places to eat in Los Angeles before you die.

He is also the writer who prompted me to explore local ethnice markets and restaurants back in the day when he wrote the column "Counter Intelligence" for the Los Angeles Times food section. I hope to make it to a small Vietnamese market today as well.

I have made another round of tangerine ice cubes and plan to hit the road shortly.

Thanks for playing along.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Heidi, where did you find those Messermeister scissors?

Check your PM's - Cookin Stuff in Torrance (a great cookware store) has them on sale today as they are having a Messermeister demo and free knife sharpening! I am packing up my pathetic Forschners to get sharpened if the line is not atrocious.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Heidi: I am still catching up - on page three! I love all your pictures, especially the visits to the various markets and ethnic stores. I have never grilled neck bones, always used them for soup. Now I have a new use for them. I love picking away at the meat on the neck bones, but I can only imagine how wonderful they will be after grilling! Thanks. :smile:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It has been a looong day.

Thanks to this community I found out that Messermeister was doing free knife sharpening and had a sale going on at a local cookware shop - Cookin Stuff in Torrance -

The lovely ladies doing the free sharpening

messer.JPG

Outside shot of the store

sign.JPG

Some shots of the shelving filled to the brim with things we all need NOW

pans.JPG

LeC.JPG

A blurry shot of the cookie cutter wall

ccuters\

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They sharpened my 3 Forschners for free and tucked them into nice holders.

knives.JPG

And a shot of Pierogi's new scissors on sale for $14.99 today only and 10 % going to the charity :)

scissors.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

  • Similar Content

    • By Mullinix18
      I'm thinking about starting a blog featuring the recipes of antoine Carême that I've translated from 1700s French? No English versions of his works exist and his work is hard to find, even though he is the greatest chef who ever lived. After I get through his works I'd add menon, la Varenne, and other hard to find, but historically important masters of French cuisine. 
    • By Duvel
      Prologue:
       
      Originally, we intended to spend this Chinese New Year in Hong Kong. We have travelled a lot last year and will need to attend a wedding already next month in Germany, so I was happy to spend some quiet days at home (and keep the spendings a bit under control as well). As a consequence, we had not booked any flights in the busiest travel time of the year in this region …
       
      But – despite all good intentions – I found myself two weeks ago calling the hotline of my favourite airline in the region, essentially cashing in on three years of extensive business travel and checking where I could get on short notice over CNY on miles. I was expecting a laughter on the other side of the line but this is the one time my status in their loyalty reward program paid out big time: three seats for either Seoul or Kansai International (earliest morning flights, of course). No need to choose, really – Kyoto, here we come !
       

    • By Tara Middleton
      Alright so as of a few months ago, I decided to take an impromptu trip to Europe--mostly unplanned but with several priorities set in mind: find the best food and locate the most game-changing ice cream spots on the grounds of each city I sought out for. One of the greatest, most architecturally unique and divine cities I have visited thus far has gotta be Vienna, Austria. But what in the heck is there to eat over there?! (you might ask). 'Cause I sure as hell didn't know. So, I desperately reached out to a local Viennese friend of mine, who knows and understands my avid passion for all things edible, and she immediately shot back some must-have food dishes. Doing a bit of research beforehand, I knew I had to try the classic "Kasekreiner". Please forgive my German if I spelled that wrong. But no matter how you say it- say it with passion, because passion is just about all I felt when I ate it. Translated: it basically means cheese sausage. Honestly, what is there not to love about those two words. Even if that's not necessarily your go-to, do me a favor and give it a shot. Trust me, you won't regret it. A classic Austrian pork sausage with pockets of melty cheese, stuffed into a crisp French Baguette. No ketchup necessary (...and as an American, that's saying a lot). YUM. Best spot to try out this one-of-a-kind treat?! Bitzinger bei der Albertina – Würstelstand. Now here's a shot of me with my one true love in front of this classic Viennese green-domed building-- Karlskirche. Now, go check it.
       
       

    • By KennethT
      OK, I'm back, by popular demand! hehe....  After being back for 2 days, I'm still struggling with crazy jetlag and exhaustion - so please bear with me!
       
      This year, for our Asian adventure, we went to Bali, which for those who don't know, is one of the islands in Indonesia.  Bali is a very unique place - from its topology, to the people, language, customs, religion and food.  Whereas the majority of people in Indonesia are Muslim, most people in Bali are Balinese Hindu, which from what I understand is a little like Indian Hinduism, but has more ancestor worship.  Religion is very important to many people in Bali - there are temples everywhere, and at least in one area, there are religious processions through the street practically every day - but we'll get to that later.
       
      Bali has some food unique to it among its Indonesian neighbors, but like everywhere, has seen quite a bit of immigration from other Indonesian islands (many from Java, just to the west) who have brought their classic dishes with them.
       
      Basically all Indonesians speak Indonesian, or what they call Bahasa Indonesia, or just Bahasa, which, anyone who has read my prior foodblogs wouldn't be surprised to hear that I learned a little bit just before the trip.  Unfortunately, I didn't get to use any of it, except a couple times which were totally unnecessary.  When speaking with each other, most people in Bali speak Balinese (totally different from bahasa) - many times when I tried using my bahasa, they smiled and replied, and then tried to teach me the same phrase in Balinese!  As time went on, and I used some of the Balinese, I got lots of surprised smiles and laughs - who is this white guy speaking Balinese?!?  Seriously though, tourism has been in Bali for a very long time, so just about everyone we encountered spoke English to some degree.  Some people spoke German as well, as they supposedly get lots of tourists from Germany.  As one of our drivers was telling us, Bali is heavily dependent on tourism as they have no real industry other than agriculture, which doesn't pay nearly as well as tourism does.
       
      While there are beaches all around the island, most of the popular beach areas are in the south of the island, and those areas are the most highly touristed.  We spent very little time in the south as we are not really beach people (we get really bored) and during planning, decided to stay in less touristed areas so we'd have more opportunities for local food... this didn't work out, as you'll see later.
       
      So, it wouldn't be a KennethT foodblog without photos in the Taipei airport and I-Mei Dim Sum, which we called home for about 4 hours before our connection to Bali...
       
      Beef noodle soup:

       
      The interior:

       
      This was the same as always - huge pieces of beef were meltingly tender.  Good bite to the thick chewy noodles.
       
      Xie long bao (soup dumplings) and char siu bao (fluffy barbeque pork buns):

    • By KennethT
      Recently, there was a thread about stir frying over charcoal, which immediately brought to mind memories of eating in Bangkok in July 2013.  At that time, I hadn't gotten into the habit of writing food blogs, and considering that I had some spare time this weekend (a rarity) I figured I would put some of those memories down on paper, so to speak.  Back then, neither my wife nor I were in the habit of taking tons of photos like we do nowadays, but I think I can cobble something together that would be interesting to folks reading it.
       
      In the spirit of memories, I'll first go back to 2006 when my wife and I took our honeymoon to Thailand (Krabi, Bangkok and Chiang Mai), Singapore and Hanoi.  That was our first time to Asia, and to be honest, I was a little nervous about it.  I was worried the language barrier would be too difficult to transcend, or that we'd have no idea where we were going.  So, to help mitigate my slight anxiety, I decided to book some guides for a few of the locations.  Our guides were great, but we realized that they really aren't necessary, and nowadays with internet access so much more prevalent, even less necessary.
       
      Prior to the trip, when emailing with our guide in Bangkok to finalize plans, I mentioned that we wanted to be continuously eating (local food, I thought was implied!)  When we got there, I realized the misunderstanding when she opened her trunk to show us many bags of chips and other snack foods.. whoops...  Anyway, once the misconception was cleared up, she took us to a noodle soup vendor:


      On the right is our guide, Tong, who is now a very famous and highly sought after guide in BKK.... at the time, we were among here first customers.  I had a chicken broth based noodle soup with fish ball, fish cake and pork meatball, and my wife had yen ta fo, which is odd because it is bright pink with seafood.  I have a lime juice, and my wife had a longan juice.
       
      This is what a lot of local food places look like:

       
       
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×