Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Darienne

The Mexican Kitchen's basic ingredients

Recommended Posts

Kensington Market in Toronto is where I have to shop. (I bought nothing I can find in Peterpatch) There are some fresh vegetables, fruits and dairy products and most of the rest is canned, boxed, packaged. I shopped last week and spent over $100.00 in about 10 minutes, but my mind went blank when I tried to think of what I should be buying. The small store was packed to the rafters and I could scarcely concentrate. I was too tired to find the tortilleria shop and I don't know if any meats are available in this area.

What I bought: tomatillos, queso panela, queso fresco, Oaxaca cheese, real chorizo, banana leaves, corn husks, crema, chicharones, cajeta from Argentina, white hominy, Mexican oregano, ground canella, Pisco sour and assorted stuff.

In Peterborough I can buy: poblanos, jalapenos, dried and ground chiles (most), Mexican vanilla, annatto seeds, corn and flour tortillas (not fresh). A few canned things: chipotles in adobo.

I have already / or don’t care about: Mexican chocolate, piloncillo, Champurrado and Horchata mixes,

Should have bought some Mexican limes and jicama and chayote. We see these occasionally in Peterpatch.

Next time...2 weeks...please help me with my shopping list. Thanks.


Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm on a bit of a dry chile kick, so I'll start by suggesting Morita, Guajillo, Arbol, Ancho, Puya, Pasilla, Japones and Cascabel chiles. These keep forever so don't worry about getting the big bag, or buy loose if you can find them.

I'd also encourage you to go for whole spices instead of powdered when available.

Fresh produce:

For some reason, growers seem to have bred the heat out of jalapeños in the past few years. I've learned to combine with serrano or habanero for the heat component while keeping the jalapeños for the flavor component when necessary. So: a "flavor" chile and a "heat" chile.

Cilantro is strictly necessary and a PITA because it doesn't keep well. Grow it? I don't know. Epazote is more optional.

Key limes stand in for Mexican limes just fine.

If you can find it, get Chihuahua cheese (sometimes sold as "Manchego," little relationship with the Spanish product). Bonus points if you can find the aged variety, even better if it's made by Mennonites.

That's all I have for now. Maybe more later when I've looked through my cupboard.


This is my skillet. There are many like it, but this one is mine. My skillet is my best friend. It is my life. I must master it, as I must master my life. Without me my skillet is useless. Without my skillet, I am useless. I must season my skillet well. I will. Before God I swear this creed. My skillet and myself are the makers of my meal. We are the masters of our kitchen. So be it, until there are no ingredients, but dinner. Amen.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I disagree that epazote is optional. Nothing in the world tastes like it and to me mexican style beans do not taste right without it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think you have a really good list already. The only things I would add that I don't see listed (but you probably already have or access to) are cloves, cumin & anise and maybe pepitas and plantains.


"The main thing to remember about Italian food is that when you put your groceries in the car, the quality of your dinner has already been decided." – Mario Batali

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I disagree that epazote is optional. Nothing in the world tastes like it and to me mexican style beans do not taste right without it.

Dirty socks.


This is my skillet. There are many like it, but this one is mine. My skillet is my best friend. It is my life. I must master it, as I must master my life. Without me my skillet is useless. Without my skillet, I am useless. I must season my skillet well. I will. Before God I swear this creed. My skillet and myself are the makers of my meal. We are the masters of our kitchen. So be it, until there are no ingredients, but dinner. Amen.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

LARD. You can't make Mexican food with lard. Other than that, what everyone else says: all dried chiles should be staples in your pantry; whole cloves, whole cinnamon, whole peppercorns, whole anise seed, raisins, pepitas. Dried black turtle beans. Cotija and/or farmer's cheese. Masa harina. Cider vinegar. I recommend making your own crema (so you need heavy cream), and of course, your own tortillas, both flour and corn. You should always have tomatillos, chorizo, and chipotles in adobo in your freezer or pantry. May I suggest also some Knorr ham stock--a very handy substitute.

Fresh: the best tomatoes you can find; epazote; oranges;poblanos and serranos (my favorite pepper); cilantro; red onions; garlic; eggs; red cabbage.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I disagree that epazote is optional. Nothing in the world tastes like it and to me mexican style beans do not taste right without it.

Dirty socks.

No.. that is truffles you are thinking.

Must be bad epazote... it should have a slightly bitter, gasoline / chemical charm to it... not for everyone but absolutely agree with Bad Rabbit epazote is essential for Black Beans but great on a great range of items... tender epazote leaves are nice for raw eating.. again people who are sensitive to bitter flavors may not get it.

Darriene you have a good list going... many people in Mexico could (and do) cook fabulous meals for an entire year with less variety than you have! True Mexican cooking is about combining the basic distinctive elements of the cuisine (Corn, Chiles, Pumpkin Seeds, Pecans, Peanuts, Beans / Legumes) with whatever highest quality ingredients are in your eco system.

The reason Mexican cuisine is so incredibly varied is because its micro local (outside of the basic staples)... it is the combination of flavors & techniques with those basics that make something Mexican... not necessarily ticking off a list of things that are stereotyped as Mexican / Latin ingredients.

I was born in Mexico City but my parents are from the highlands of Jalisco where there are a number of ingredients vital to their micro-regional cuisine that many outsiders might not consider "Mexican"... barley, asparagus, cauliflower, peaches, pasta, buttermilk, ricotta etc., on surface these ingredients might seem more like continental cooking.. but one look at the foods & taste.. what people do with them is completely unique to Mexico and specifically to that corner of the country... it is cold & dry certain non-native ingredients do very well there.. that is what people cook with. There is one very important truth in Mexican cooking, that has nothing to do with trendiness of Slow Food etc., people like cooking with best, plentifully ingredients possible... and figure out away to have it fit within a Mexican gastronomic tradition... I am not talking about cutesy Chef fusions.. lots of ingredients in your region could perfectly fit into the Mex gastronomic tradition.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

LARD. You can't make Mexican food with lard. Other than that, what everyone else says: all dried chiles should be staples in your pantry; whole cloves, whole cinnamon, whole peppercorns, whole anise seed, raisins, pepitas. Dried black turtle beans. Cotija and/or farmer's cheese. Masa harina. Cider vinegar. I recommend making your own crema (so you need heavy cream), and of course, your own tortillas, both flour and corn. You should always have tomatillos, chorizo, and chipotles in adobo in your freezer or pantry. May I suggest also some Knorr ham stock--a very handy substitute.

Fresh: the best tomatoes you can find; epazote; oranges;poblanos and serranos (my favorite pepper); cilantro; red onions; garlic; eggs; red cabbage.

That is funny... my style of cooking is Pre-Hispanic rooted, based on teachings from my aunt-in-laws who are native descendants of the nahuatl speaking Mexica peoples of the Mexico City area.. some of the best, most sophisticated, delicate Mexican cuisine doesn't contain any lard at all.... granted it is a lot more work & requires greater finese & ability to cook without an instant, "cheap" flavor enhancer like Lard but I think the results are much more soulful, deeply rooted in Mexican tradition, and impressive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I disagree that epazote is optional. Nothing in the world tastes like it and to me mexican style beans do not taste right without it.

Dirty socks.

No.. that is truffles you are thinking.

Must be bad epazote... it should have a slightly bitter, gasoline / chemical charm to it... not for everyone but absolutely agree with Bad Rabbit epazote is essential for Black Beans but great on a great range of items... tender epazote leaves are nice for raw eating.. again people who are sensitive to bitter flavors may not get it.

Epazote's charm is comletely lost on me, sorry. As you pointed out there is a lot of regional variation in Mexican cooking. I was born and raised and live in the North and epazote, while known, is far from a staple. I maintain it's perfectly possible to cook "authentic" Mexican without epazote, if you don't like it, and many people don't.


This is my skillet. There are many like it, but this one is mine. My skillet is my best friend. It is my life. I must master it, as I must master my life. Without me my skillet is useless. Without my skillet, I am useless. I must season my skillet well. I will. Before God I swear this creed. My skillet and myself are the makers of my meal. We are the masters of our kitchen. So be it, until there are no ingredients, but dinner. Amen.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks all for all the useful ideas. I'll have a few items to add to my pantry next time I go to Toronto.


Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This page on About.com

Has a fairly complete list of things to stock in the Mexican Pantry.

One thing no one on this forum has mentioned (or I didn't see) is tamarind paste or tamarindo

I keep this always on hand because there is nothing quite like to to sharpen the taste of a stew or meaty soup.

I shopped at Vallarta Supermarket today

At present I have

some huge plantains

some little red bananas

4 large poblanos

4 Anahemi chiles

a pound of tomatillo milpero

a small bunch of the little bulb-type Mexican onions

Lemons

Limes (Mexican)

1 huge Mexican papaya

brown onions from Mexico

some cheeses

fresh pork neck bones (Espinazo de Puerco)

chorizo de pollo (have never tried chicken chorizo before)

Costillas Norteñas de Res (Beef Flanken Ribs) lots of meat on these guys.

I also purchased from the prepared foods

1 Platillo de Pollo en Mole (as listed on my receipt)

con Arroz, Frijoles y Tortillas.

That was my dinner and was very good (and no work) indeed! :wub:


"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the list Andie. Printed out for my next visit to Toronto,

Actually I have Tamarind paste on hand for other cuisines but you are so right.


Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Darienne

From the sounds of it you were at Perolas or the Latin American Emporium in Kensington Market. Either way, right across the street is Segovia Meats. They sell various meats, but the main attraction is the rather large variety of chorizo. They usually have a chorizo verde that I quite enjoy.

I would highly recommend trying epazote with black beans. I usually find it at Perolas during the off season. If you haven't smelled it before, don't be thrown by the odour. As noted above, it's not for everyone, but I do recommend trying it.

You mentioned you could by corn tortillas in Peterborough - I'm guessing you aren't making your own corn tortillas. If not, I highly recommend giving it a shot, there's a few threads on this forum that helped me immensely. Tortilla presses can be had at Perolas, and masa harina as well, but you shouldn't have any issues finding that in Peterborough.

Hope that helps,

Brian

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I now have a bag of nopales my neighbors brought over. Now I just have to decide what to do with them.


"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This page on About.com

Has a fairly complete list of things to stock in the Mexican Pantry.

One thing no one on this forum has mentioned (or I didn't see) is tamarind paste or tamarindo

I keep this always on hand because there is nothing quite like to to sharpen the taste of a stew or meaty soup.

Forgot that one. Agreed; and it keeps very well, I find, so easy to have on hand.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I now have a bag of nopales my neighbors brought over. Now I just have to decide what to do with them.

What dishes have you already prepared with Nopales?

My go to Nopales dish is the Ensalada de Moctezuma... you grill (griddle or roast) the whole, trimmed pad and let it cool to room temperature. Then you mount it with slices of good quality tomatoes like the Zebra heirloom varieties (which originated in Oaxaca btw), you top those with a dollop of Guacamole Verde... eat with a knife & fork.. it is great as a substantial first course... when I want to make a meal of that.. some Sopa de Habas (pureed Mexican Lima Bean soup with simmered diced nopales slices, swirl of Chipotle salsa & sprinkling of Mex mint or epazote)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Darienne

From the sounds of it you were at Perolas or the Latin American Emporium in Kensington Market. Either way, right across the street is Segovia Meats. They sell various meats, but the main attraction is the rather large variety of chorizo. They usually have a chorizo verde that I quite enjoy.

I would highly recommend trying epazote with black beans. I usually find it at Perolas during the off season. If you haven't smelled it before, don't be thrown by the odour. As noted above, it's not for everyone, but I do recommend trying it.

You mentioned you could by corn tortillas in Peterborough - I'm guessing you aren't making your own corn tortillas. If not, I highly recommend giving it a shot, there's a few threads on this forum that helped me immensely. Tortilla presses can be had at Perolas, and masa harina as well, but you shouldn't have any issues finding that in Peterborough.

Hope that helps,

Brian

Good Heavens, you really are a very new member of eG. Welcome and you are correct, I was at Perolas. I shall look for Segovia Meats next visit for their chorizo and also remember to ask for Epazote.

I have both Masa Harina and a press and making my own tortillas is on my list. I confess that it's not very near the top right now. It's all so new to me that I have a lot of easier things to try first.

Thanks for all the suggestions and enjoy yourself on eG. Darienne


Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Darienne

From the sounds of it you were at Perolas or the Latin American Emporium in Kensington Market. Either way, right across the street is Segovia Meats. They sell various meats, but the main attraction is the rather large variety of chorizo. They usually have a chorizo verde that I quite enjoy.

I would highly recommend trying epazote with black beans. I usually find it at Perolas during the off season. If you haven't smelled it before, don't be thrown by the odour. As noted above, it's not for everyone, but I do recommend trying it.

You mentioned you could by corn tortillas in Peterborough - I'm guessing you aren't making your own corn tortillas. If not, I highly recommend giving it a shot, there's a few threads on this forum that helped me immensely. Tortilla presses can be had at Perolas, and masa harina as well, but you shouldn't have any issues finding that in Peterborough.

Hope that helps,

Brian

Good Heavens, you really are a very new member of eG. Welcome and you are correct, I was at Perolas. I shall look for Segovia Meats next visit for their chorizo and also remember to ask for Epazote.

I have both Masa Harina and a press and making my own tortillas is on my list. I confess that it's not very near the top right now. It's all so new to me that I have a lot of easier things to try first.

Thanks for all the suggestions and enjoy yourself on eG. Darienne

Brian, welcome to eGullet!

Darienne, I'm a novice at Mexican cooking too and only made fresh tortillas for the first time last year. They are so easy and so delicious that it's worth the small time investment. As Brian said, there are some great topics here to walk you through the process. Start with Making Tortillas at Home.



Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Darienne, I'm a novice at Mexican cooking too and only made fresh tortillas for the first time last year. They are so easy and so delicious that it's worth the small time investment. As Brian said, there are some great topics here to walk you through the process. Start with Making Tortillas at Home.

Gotcha. I'll move it up to the top of the very long list (which includes non-Mexican dishes also). :smile:


Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Darienne, I'm a novice at Mexican cooking too and only made fresh tortillas for the first time last year. They are so easy and so delicious that it's worth the small time investment. As Brian said, there are some great topics here to walk you through the process. Start with Making Tortillas at Home.

Gotcha. I'll move it up to the top of the very long list (which includes non-Mexican dishes also). :smile:

And another reason is that regions of the world that do not have a large Mexican populace do not offer good commercially-produced tortillas.

I know - I've lived in several. Like Alaska, Panama, the Philippines, just to name just a few.

And it's practically impossible to have good, fresh tortillas shipped in. But you can lay your hands on the dry ingredients pretty easily. Most Mexican markets sell it, but if not, you can either have a friend or family member send you some, or tote some home from visits.

As soon as you learn how to make your own tortillas, your whole Mexican food world changes.


Edited by Jaymes (log)

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is a tortilla press really a requirement for making tortillas? If you don't have one, but wanted to make tortillas oh, say, tonight, what would be the next-best way to form them?


Matthew Kayahara

Kayahara.ca

@mtkayahara

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not really. You can form them by hand (pat a cake style), use a rolling pin to roll them out between some parchment paper or create a makeshift press with whatever flat surfaces you have handy. A tortilla press is pretty handy when you want to make a quantity of them, though.


"The main thing to remember about Italian food is that when you put your groceries in the car, the quality of your dinner has already been decided." – Mario Batali

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not really. You can form them by hand (pat a cake style), use a rolling pin to roll them out between some parchment paper or create a makeshift press with whatever flat surfaces you have handy. A tortilla press is pretty handy when you want to make a quantity of them, though.

Right. You start by forming the dough into small balls - about the size of a ping pong ball, I'd say, depending upon how big you want them.

Then pat, pat, pat.

I used wax paper and a rolling pin to sort of finish them off, before I got my press.


I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My homemade tortillas never came out right until I got a press. Not saying it can't be done, I've just had much greater success with the press.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I now have a bag of nopales my neighbors brought over. Now I just have to decide what to do with them.

What dishes have you already prepared with Nopales?

My go to Nopales dish is the Ensalada de Moctezuma... you grill (griddle or roast) the whole, trimmed pad and let it cool to room temperature. Then you mount it with slices of good quality tomatoes like the Zebra heirloom varieties (which originated in Oaxaca btw), you top those with a dollop of Guacamole Verde... eat with a knife & fork.. it is great as a substantial first course... when I want to make a meal of that.. some Sopa de Habas (pureed Mexican Lima Bean soup with simmered diced nopales slices, swirl of Chipotle salsa & sprinkling of Mex mint or epazote)

I had an omelet with nopalitos for breakfast - too eager to dig into it to take photos.

I think my all-time favorite recipe isthis version of pork ribs except I add twice the amount of nopales.

I also make a shredded chicken dish with nopales - no recipe, I just put together carmelized onions, chopped and cooked tomatillos, nopales and one or two Anaheim chiles and one jalapeno (stewed in a little water.

Seasoned with salt, pepper, cumin Mexican oregano (from Rancho Gordo) and some chicken broth.


"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By Henga
      Hi there! I am looking for a good Mexican cookbook. Any recommendations? Thanks in advance.
    • By newchef
      I'm trying to make a Roasted Poblano and Black Bean Enchilada recipe and I don't know if the tomatillo cream sauce will be freezer-friendly.     Basically I process the following ingredients in a food processor to make the cream sauce.  I plan on freezing the sauce in ice-cube trays for individual servings.  The sauce will then be thawed and spread on a baking dish and also used to top the enchiladas and cook in a 400 degree oven.   Thanks!   INGREDIENTS:   -26 ounces canned tomatillos, drained -1 onion -1/2 cup cilantro leaves -1/3 cup vegetable broth -1/4 cup heavy cream -1 tbsp vegetable oil -3 garlic cloves -1 tbsp lime juice -1 tsp sugar -1 tsp salt
    • By David Ross
      Ah, the avocado! For many of us, this humble little fruit inspires only one dish. Yet the avocado has a culinary history that is deeper than we may understand.
       
      The avocado (Persea Americana) is a tree thought to have originated in South Central Mexico.  It’s a member of the flowering plant family Lauraceae.  The fruit of the plant - yes, it's a fruit and not a vegetable - is also called avocado.
       
      Avocados grow in tropical and warm climates throughout the world.  The season in California typically runs from February through September, but avocados from Mexico are now available year-round.
       
      The avocado has a higher fat content than other fruits, and as such serves as an important staple in the diet of consumers who are seeking other sources of protein than meats and fatty foods.  Avocado oil has found a new customer base due to its flavor in dressings and sauces and the high smoke point is favorable when sautéing meat and seafood. 
       
      In recent years, due in part to catchy television commercials and the influence of Pinterest, the avocado has seen a resurgence in popularity with home cooks and professionals.  Walk into your local casual spot and the menu will undoubtedly have some derivation of avocado toast, typically topped with bacon.  Avocados have found a rightful place back on fine dining menus, but unfortunately all too often over-worked dishes with too many ingredients and garnishes erase the pure taste and silky texture of an avocado. 
       
      When I think of an avocado it’s the Hass variety.  However, a friend who lives in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, can buy Choquette, Hall and Lulu avocados in the local markets.  This link provides good information about the different varieties of avocados, when they’re in season and the differences in taste and texture. https://www.foodrepublic.com/2012/10/18/know-your-avocado-varieties-and-when-theyre-in-season/
       
      I for one must challenge myself to start eating and cooking more avocados.  I think my recipe for guacamole served with chicharrones is superb, and the cobb salad with large chunks of ripe avocado is delicious, but as a close friend recently said, “one person’s ‘not especially new’ is another’s “eureka moment.” Well said and as history tells us, we’ll find plenty of eureka moments as we discuss and share our tales and dishes of avocado during eG Cook-Off #81: The Avocado.
       
      Fun fact: The name avocado derives from the Nahuatl word “ahuacatl,” which was also slang for “testicle.”
      See the complete eG Cook-Off Index here https://forums.egullet.org/topic/143994-egullet-recipe-cook-off-index/
    • By Darienne
      Chile Rellenos.  Every Mexican or Mexican type restaurant we've ever been in almost, I've chosen Chile Rellenos.   I keep thinking I'll pick something different...and then I don't.  I've made them.  Once.  So much trouble.  And deep fat frying.  And of course in the Far Frozen North where we live, we've been able to get Poblanos (that's it) for only about five years now.  
       
      Imagine my delight, the appeal to my very lazy side, to discover the following recipe just a few days ago: https://www.homesicktexan.com/2018/09/chile-relleno-casserole-el-paso-style.html  .  And yesterday I made them and served them to guests with Mexican rice and black beans.  Died and gone to heaven.
       
      OK.  Truth time.  I used Poblanos and  I did not roast them to remove the skins.  In an electric oven, it's not a nice job.  And besides the skins have never bothered me or Ed at all.  But I did roast the Poblanos in the oven.  And then I used commercial salsa because we had one we liked.  (Did I say that I can be lazy sometimes?)  And I used Pepper Jack cheese.  Jack cheese is not always available in the small Ontario city we live outside of and pepper jack is even less common.  Buy it when you see it.  I defrosted some frozen guacamole I had in the freezer.  But by heavens the casserole was delicious and now it's on our menu permanently.
       
      So shoot me.  But I thought I'd share my joy anyway. 
    • By jackie40503
      I lived in Phoenix AZ a total of 24 years and during that time I found what the local restaurants call a Green Chili Burro. I have also lived and worked in 48 states and the only ones who have them is either in Arizona, Western New Mexico or Southern California. I am now retired in Northwest Washington State. I have searched the internet for recipes and have found that none of them taste the same. I have also written to many Mexican restaurants and either did not receive a reply or was told that they could not give out the recipe. I am now going around to blogs/forums dealing with Mexican foods hoping that someone would have the actual recipe from one of the restaurants. Its not like I am going trying to compete with them since I live along way from those areas and only wish to serve it in my own household.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...