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heidih

Uses for pineapple core

30 posts in this topic

I just cut up a sweet and fragrant pineapple for tomorrow's Easter meal. I am left with the slices of core. Generally I munch on them. When they are really fibrous I just spit it out after getting all the flavor.

Today I am just not in the mood and was wondering about other uses.

One of the dishes I am planning is noodles tossed with sesame oil, crushed peanuts, soy sauce, and loads of fresh mint along with grated citrus zest & juice, Rancho Gordo's piconcillo sugar and fresh serranos. I am wondering if I can cube the cores really small to add texture or slice super thin. I am worried about someone getting a fibrous bit that they really would like to discard discreetly. Maybe I could whizz them in the food processor with the noodle dressing.

Has anyone used them in an interesting way? Thoughts?

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I'd be inclined to slice it across the grain (because it is rather fibrous) and perhaps dry it, to either eat as a snack, or perhaps see whether it makes for a nice infusion, perhaps in conjunction with ginger.

To be honest, though, I've always treated pineapple as something intrinsically two-textured (a bit like a carrot), and have never cored (even though I'm incredibly finicky about the way I peal it); I just slice it across, and cut each slice radially, so each piece has a little bit of core.


Michaela, aka "Mjx"
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It makes a great teether.


"Salt is born of the purest of parents: the sun and the sea." --Pythagoras.

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When I opened the fridge I saw some ginger and realized that it is pretty fibrous as well so I think I am going to try to incorporate it in my dressing for the noodles.

I also glanced at the cores and was struck with the thought that they could be treated like the Vietnamese preparation where a ground shrimp mixture is wrapped around sugarcane and grilled. That will not pan out today, but I will keep it in mind.

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I mostly put the core in the blender and make smoothies.

dcarch

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I recently took pineapple core and tossed it into my pressure cooker with some unsweetened coconut flakes and a little water. I had it at high pressure for about 30 minutes it made a nice lightly flavored pina-colada stock. I made a few beverages with the resulting liquid and spherified the rest.


Andrew Vaserfirer aka avaserfi

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If you were feeling really scientific you could make bromelain.

There must be more refined ways, but essentially blast the core in a blender or food processor, let the result settle and use the clear layer that (maybe) develops after a day or so to inject meat. Bromelain is a powerful tenderiser; having tried it (and experienced it at a restaurant where I'd previously attended a demonstraton and could thus decipher what 'injected chicken' on the menu meant) I find it leaves tracks of 'predigested' meat through your (for example) piece of chicken which I find slightly disconcerting.

But ya gotta try these things, right ... ?


Leslie Craven, aka "lesliec"
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lesliec - on a more simplistic level (though I am degreed in biology) - I was thinking of whizzing them as a marinade additive for the same enzymatic reason. I have pitched them in the freezer as the Easter cooking prep is at the forefront now.

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How about soaking in vodka for some tasty shots?

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Cut into planks, slice into large matchsticks, et voila: The perfect swizzle stick for tropical drinks.


If you ate pasta and antipasto, would you still be hungry? ~Author Unknown

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Daisy Martinez's VINAGRE along with the peel


Wawa Sizzli FTW!

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I recently took pineapple core and tossed it into my pressure cooker with some unsweetened coconut flakes and a little water. I had it at high pressure for about 30 minutes it made a nice lightly flavored pina-colada stock. I made a few beverages with the resulting liquid and spherified the rest.

I love it! I just put a link to your post on my facebook page. I think you made one of the first "pressure cooker" drinks.

Bravo!

L


hip pressure cooking - making pressure cooking hip, one recipe at a time!

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At schwa in Chicago, I had pineapple core that had been sliced very thin (mandoline?) and cooked, probably sous vide, then served as a sort of papardelle. It was delicious. I think I'll try it out....


Chris Amirault

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Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

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At schwa in Chicago, I had pineapple core that had been sliced very thin (mandoline?) and cooked, probably sous vide, then served as a sort of papardelle. It was delicious. I think I'll try it out....

Good grief - you people may get me dabbling in sous vide yet! Sounds intriguing.

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I'd be inclined to slice it across the grain (because it is rather fibrous) and perhaps dry it, to either eat as a snack, or perhaps see whether it makes for a nice infusion, perhaps in conjunction with ginger.

I make an infusion in rum. Slice into small bits, add rum to cover in a container in the fridge, leave for two weeks. Ginger probably won't work as it loses its spiciness very quickly.

At schwa in Chicago, I had pineapple core that had been sliced very thin (mandoline?) and cooked, probably sous vide, then served as a sort of papardelle. It was delicious. I think I'll try it out....

This sounds completely crazy. Does it actually have a noodley texture?

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Daisy Martinez's VINAGRE along with the peel

I thought of this, as well.

Here's a link to Daisy's web site and the recipe "Spicy Pineapple Vinegar "(click). You could easily omit the habeñeros or substitute a milder chile pepper.


“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

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Daisy Martinez's VINAGRE along with the peel

I thought of this, as well.

Here's a link to Daisy's web site and the recipe "Spicy Pineapple Vinegar "(click). You could easily omit the habeñeros or substitute a milder chile pepper.

I will be trying this the next time I have a pineapple. I had already discarded the skins when this came up. I still have a few habaneros from last garden season in the freezer so it will be a perfect showcase I think.

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I often chop and crush pineapple skins and the core, boil them in just enough water to cover until it has reduced about half and the mass is soft, then add it to one of my vinegar "works."

However, I don't use just pineapple, I add other fruits that have gone a bit past their prime.

Pears that have become very soft, peaches and etc.

Makes a nice, fruity vinegar.


"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

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I just cut up a sweet and fragrant pineapple for tomorrow's Easter meal. I am left with the slices of core. Generally I munch on them. When they are really fibrous I just spit it out after getting all the flavor.

Today I am just not in the mood and was wondering about other uses.

One of the dishes I am planning is noodles tossed with sesame oil, crushed peanuts, soy sauce, and loads of fresh mint along with grated citrus zest & juice, Rancho Gordo's piconcillo sugar and fresh serranos. I am wondering if I can cube the cores really small to add texture or slice super thin. I am worried about someone getting a fibrous bit that they really would like to discard discreetly. Maybe I could whizz them in the food processor with the noodle dressing.

Has anyone used them in an interesting way? Thoughts?

Have you made Tepache (Fermented Pineapple Beverage) yet (also utilizes the fleshy skin parts)? Here is a basic recipe:

http://www.gourmetsleuth.com/Recipes/Cold-Beverages-654/Tepache-702.aspx

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Note... Gourmet Sleuth recipe includes pineapple flesh... but most people don't do it that way.. just the skin & core. Also, adding yeast for making root beer is not a bad idea and results in extra carbonation.

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Here's the "noodles." First, prep to slice them nice and thin:

DSC00006.JPG

Resulting pile of thin noodles (with bizarre lighting problem thanks to Picasa):

DSC00009.JPG

I cooked them sous vide at 75C for a couple of hours with some piloncillo and banana vinegar from Rancho Gordo. Next morning, I sliced them into thinner ribbons, added some julienned ginger, serrano chiles, salt, lime, and peanuts:

DSC00025.JPG

They were excellent, sort of a slightly crunchy pineapple version of somtam. Went very well with the grilled chicken.


Chris Amirault

camirault@eGstaff.org

eG Ethics Signatory

Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

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Here's the "noodles." First, prep to slice them nice and thin:

DSC00006.JPG

Resulting pile of thin noodles (with bizarre lighting problem thanks to Picasa):

DSC00009.JPG

I cooked them sous vide at 75C for a couple of hours with some piloncillo and banana vinegar from Rancho Gordo. Next morning, I sliced them into thinner ribbons, added some julienned ginger, serrano chiles, salt, lime, and peanuts:

DSC00025.JPG

They were excellent, sort of a slightly crunchy pineapple version of somtam. Went very well with the grilled chicken.

Chris... on the topic of repurposing "waste" parts... have you had Hibiscus blossom tacos? They are traditional in the state of Guerrero, and now popular in Mexico City as well... you take the boiled hibiscus blossoms used for making Agua Fresca... then sautee them with garlic, onions etc.... they have an interesting spongy texture and flavor.

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Here's the "noodles." First, prep to slice them nice and thin:

DSC00006.JPG

Resulting pile of thin noodles (with bizarre lighting problem thanks to Picasa):

DSC00009.JPG

I cooked them sous vide at 75C for a couple of hours with some piloncillo and banana vinegar from Rancho Gordo. Next morning, I sliced them into thinner ribbons, added some julienned ginger, serrano chiles, salt, lime, and peanuts:

DSC00025.JPG

They were excellent, sort of a slightly crunchy pineapple version of somtam. Went very well with the grilled chicken.

Interesting, and pretty.

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I like the concept of the final prep - Chris do you think the thin slice and a blanch would get to that som tam acceptable stage? Maybe even just super thinly sliced in that prep would be good. That is my salad sweet spot.

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