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How Do You Eat/Peel/Open a Mango?

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I'm with "Jaymes' method", as is everyone I know.

I eat a LOT of mangoes. They grow profusely round here and, in season, are so cheap they are virtually free. There is a mango tree right outside my apartment window, but it belongs to the local cop shop. They guard it. In fact, I think that is the only reason the substation is there!

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I'm with "Jaymes' method", as is everyone I know.

I eat a LOT of mangoes. They grow profusely round here and, in season, are so cheap they are virtually free. There is a mango tree right outside my apartment window, but it belongs to the local cop shop. They guard it. In fact, I think that is the only reason the substation is there!

We eat a lot of mangoes as well, although not so many as when we had trees in our yard, and when they were ubiquituous at local fruit markets and roadside stands. Now, living in Texas, we buy them at Costco or Sam's.

I admire the novelty of the corkscrew idea, but find it unworkable in practical application.

We're having a backyard party for Memorial Day and on the menu is a big fresh-fruit salad. I'll cut up at least six or seven mangoes to put in. If I had to screw a corkscrew into each one, I'd still be standing here screwing long after my guests had come, eaten, and departed.


Edited by Jaymes (log)

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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I've never had a mango before (to the best of my knowledge).  After seeing several posts lately and thinking that they looked really good ( @liuzhou had one for breakfast a while back) I decided to splurge and order 3 from Harry and David online (I joined a monthly club for a few months).

 

I had to google how to cut one up and I'm sure I butchered it but OH MY what have I been missing out on all these years????  Sweet...kind of like a cross between a cantaloupe and a peach...juice dripping down my arms.  I'm sad I only have two more!

 

thumbnail_IMG_7924.jpg.62d4fd2c59d8dda93f810765d93f5c4b.jpg

thumbnail_IMG_7925.jpg.47206b72a7499f4c24bb48b70023afd8.jpg

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@Shelby I wish you could taste the ones in Asia!  They make any of the ones I've had in NY taste like cardboard. They've ruined me for 355 days a year (on a good year when I get to go to Asia in the summer)

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@Shelby 

 

I grew up in CA and we always had fruit trees ;

 

several varieties of peaches , nectarines , and plums, and the queen of them all :

 

Apricots !

 

the standard for ripeness was indeed :

 

""   .juice dripping down my arms  ""

 

 

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24 minutes ago, KennethT said:

@Shelby I wish you could taste the ones in Asia!  They make any of the ones I've had in NY taste like cardboard. They've ruined me for 355 days a year (on a good year when I get to go to Asia in the summer)

I get some pretty good ones here nowadays.

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

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Just now, weinoo said:

I get some pretty good ones here nowadays.

Yes, I've gotten pretty good too, but it's like comparing a Chevy to a Lamborghini.  The Chevy is pretty good and will reliably get you where you need to go, but no one would ever compare it to a Lamborghini

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37 minutes ago, Shelby said:

I've never had a mango before (to the best of my knowledge).  After seeing several posts lately and thinking that they looked really good ( @liuzhou had one for breakfast a while back) I decided to splurge and order 3 from Harry and David online (I joined a monthly club for a few months).

 

I had to google how to cut one up and I'm sure I butchered it but OH MY what have I been missing out on all these years????  Sweet...kind of like a cross between a cantaloupe and a peach...juice dripping down my arms.  I'm sad I only have two more!

 

thumbnail_IMG_7924.jpg.62d4fd2c59d8dda93f810765d93f5c4b.jpg

thumbnail_IMG_7925.jpg.47206b72a7499f4c24bb48b70023afd8.jpg

 

My preferred way is to make 2 cuts parallel to the seed, removing two wide slices, sort of like this: (| |). Then peel the skin off the central part with the seed and just eat around it. For the 2 pieces you cut off, you can score the flesh and pop out the pieces into a sort of hedgehog-looking thing, and then cut them off or eat them directly - or you can just not bother scoring them and use a spoon if it's ripe enough. Mangos kick ass!

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As noted by others I cut the cheeks off close to the pit, then can usually peel skin back. The pit w/ remaining flesh = cook's treat. My South Asian neighbor would buy the big boxes in season and share. I did reciprocate with "kick ass" plums. Her daughter came over one day and complained "mommy ate all the plums! - do you have more - I am sick of mangoes".

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1 hour ago, weinoo said:

I get some pretty good ones here nowadays.

Where?

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I do the circular peel of the entire fruit (sort of like peeling an apple). Then, two slices (these are the prime pieces) along the flat sides of the seed (getting as close to the seed as possible). Then, two more slices along the skinny sides of the seed. Then, slice off random pieces from the seed.

 

969126613_ScreenShot2020-06-28at8_04_54AM.png.c6f4b5f537e386297d3f358402a90146.png

 

Glad you got to try mango, @Shelby !

 

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10 minutes ago, weinoo said:

Sometimes my guy on the corner.

 

The corner guys rock. Here it is more the fruit cart guys - but still a nice option.

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2 minutes ago, heidih said:

 

The corner guys rock. Here it is more the fruit cart guys - but still a nice option.

 

Oh, he's a fruit/vegetable cart for sure...

 

image.thumb.png.56a2684a64632aafb6ffc5cb99ccc4f5.png

 

Picture taken a long time (12 years) ago - the cart is much bigger and somewhat nicer now. The faux Mr. Softee truck is still around too.

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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1 hour ago, weinoo said:

Sometimes my guy on the corner.

I'm sorry, but I don't think that any mango that you get in the NY area, no matter how good your fruit distributor is, is going to compare to a tree ripened fruit.  Before going to SE Asia during mango season, I used to think that the Champagne or Ataulfo mangoes (grown in Mexico and picked green and "ripened' in a warehouse) were the best things ever - but once I had a mango in Thailand everything changed.  The whole perspective changes.  Don't get me wrong, I still get the ataulfo mangoes (much better than the Tommy Atkins variety, imo) but I can taste and smell the difference.

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Yes, lots of differences in mangoes from different parts of the world. A friend who traveled to Africa told me that those were really, really good. She compared it to a peach & said that there was no stringy stuff close to the seed.

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34 minutes ago, MokaPot said:

Yes, lots of differences in mangoes from different parts of the world. A friend who traveled to Africa told me that those were really, really good. She compared it to a peach & said that there was no stringy stuff close to the seed.

This is similar to some of the best I've had in SE Asia.  I had one in Thailand where you didn't even need to chew - you just put a piece between your tongue and roof of your mouth and press.... it would just squoosh... and it was just sooo juicy....

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44 minutes ago, KennethT said:

I'm sorry, but I don't think that any mango that you get in the NY area, no matter how good your fruit distributor is, is going to compare to a tree ripened fruit.  Before going to SE Asia during mango season, I used to think that the Champagne or Ataulfo mangoes (grown in Mexico and picked green and "ripened' in a warehouse) were the best things ever - but once I had a mango in Thailand everything changed.  The whole perspective changes.  Don't get me wrong, I still get the ataulfo mangoes (much better than the Tommy Atkins variety, imo) but I can taste and smell the difference.

But most of us in the US aren't ever going to get that Thai mango.  So, if what we can get is, to our palate, lovely and delicious and something we'd eat again and again, what's the point of hearing how it doesn't measure up?  I'm truly, truly not trying to be belligerent, but I don't ever get the point of telling someone that they aren't getting the "best" when they are perfectly happy with what they are getting and are unable to get to what is supposed to be "best".  

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IMO, it would be possible to ship / fly a mango (well-packed) to another location without a crazy loss in quality. IIRC, mangoes can ripen after they're picked. So, maybe you could ship mangoes that are 2 days away from peak ripeness.

 

IMO, the type of mango is very important. The types vary greatly. (Sort of like how a Hass avocado, IMO, is so much creamier than other avocados.)

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The ataulfo mangoes here are definitely the best choice. And I think I'm in the minority, but I do like @MokaPotdoes, I peel first (though not in a circular pattern) and then cut the cheeks off, then the remaining bits. Or I just chew the remaining bits off.  😃

 

That hedgehog cut with peel attached never seems to work very well for me, I don't know why.

 

I start by cutting a bit off one end so that i have a flat spot to balance the fruit after peeling and before cutting.  


Edited by FauxPas (log)
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57 minutes ago, Kim Shook said:

But most of us in the US aren't ever going to get that Thai mango.  So, if what we can get is, to our palate, lovely and delicious and something we'd eat again and again, what's the point of hearing how it doesn't measure up?  I'm truly, truly not trying to be belligerent, but I don't ever get the point of telling someone that they aren't getting the "best" when they are perfectly happy with what they are getting and are unable to get to what is supposed to be "best".  

I'm sorry - I'm really not trying to make anyone feel bad or like they're missing out... One of the things that I love about this community is that we have representatives from all over the world, with a huge host of experiences. I love reading about when other people experience something that I may never experience... or maybe I might.  Maybe some of the things I read here inspire my travel so I can get the opportunity to experience what they have. I understand that I have the opportunity to travel more often or to farther flung places than others and I feel incredibly fortunate to be able to do so. When I read about people in barbeque country talk about the stuff they can get, I love it, and I love knowing that no matter how good the barbeque is that i can get in NYC (some of it is pretty good), I like to keep it in perspective as to what is available all over.  One day I will make it to Franklin BBQ, or to eastern North Carolina for whole hog... but until i can get there, I can live vicariously through the stories I read here.  That's what I'm trying to do when talking about the Thai mangoes as compared to what is available in NYC.  As someone who has had both, I want to put things in perspective - I'm not trying to knock the NY available product - I'm trying to say (albeit maybe not very well) to people to try to imagine how good it could be.. so those who may never have an opportunity to see the things I've seen to live vicariously through me.

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58 minutes ago, MokaPot said:

IMO, it would be possible to ship / fly a mango (well-packed) to another location without a crazy loss in quality. IIRC, mangoes can ripen after they're picked. So, maybe you could ship mangoes that are 2 days away from peak ripeness.

 

IMO, the type of mango is very important. The types vary greatly. (Sort of like how a Hass avocado, IMO, is so much creamier than other avocados.)

Exactly - variety is super important.  I've had some tree ripened mangoes in Indonesia that looked amazing and were super juicy, but literally had like no flavor at all.

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