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Pam R

eG Foodblog: Pam R (2011) - Passover Part III

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Brunch!

Frittata full of vegetables (potato, red onion, zucchini, mushrooms, grape tomatoes), a little feta cheese and a couple of pinches of chopped fresh oregano.

IMG00280-20110423-1019.jpg

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Has anybody used these eggplants? (Strawberries are there to give you a sense of the size. Though maybe the fact that they're all sitting in a large soup bowl with the strawberries shows that.)

IMG00281-20110423-1113.jpg

I wanted to make something with eggplant, maybe eggplant parmesan, but these are the only eggplants I could find (a customer reported that she checked all three of the large grocery stores in our neighbourhood on Thursday and none of them had large globe eggplants). They aren't bitter are they?

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I'm off in search of kitchen stools. I'll take pictures if I see anything promising.


Edited by Pam R (log)

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That lemon meringue pie with the coconut crust is a dessert that will stay as a strong happy visual in my mind - and I am not a sweets person. Beautiful.

From your photos and narrative I am getting a real sense of how comfortable and natural the cooking techniques are to you. I love watching that "in action".

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This has been another fascinating look into another kitchen and a store too. I had no idea you had such a big business going on there. The ordering, the unloading, the stacking, the ORGANIZING.....the cooking and baking.

Thanks for the look into your food life.

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Pam, I am lost in admiration for how you make so much work look so easy.

And I am seriously craving yesterday's dinner of latkes, lamb, and lemon meringue pie.



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Pam – I am thoroughly enjoying this week with you. I love that you work with your family – this would be a dream come true for me, especially if it centered around food. I am just amazed at your stamina – a week like this one with the added work of a blog and on top of all of that you are actually cooking at home, too! My heroine!

I, too, covet access to a band saw.

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After brunch I did go looking for kitchen stools and I found some! Ordered, but I forgot to take pictures. By the time I got home it was lose to 6 PM and I didn't have the time (well, ok, the patience) for salting and waiting on the eggplant, so I just dived right in.

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Sliced the eggplant then dipped into cake meal seasoned with salt, pepper, paprika and oregano. The into an egg wash seasoned with salt, pepper and a little grated garlic. Back into the cake meal. Fried until golden brown and drained one paper towel.

Simple sauce: crushed tomatoes, salt, pepper, olive oil, fresh garlic and lots of fresh basil.

Layered: eggplant, sauce, Parmesan, mozzarella, repeat.

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Into the oven until cooked through, melted and golden brown.

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Ate with a simple salad with a red wine vinaigrette.

Oh, I only used the small globe eggplants -- they were great! In fact, less seeds than the larger ones, firm flesh and not at all bitter.

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I've used those before. I think they're pretty good. Not as good as the long, skinny ones, IMO. They are a bit more....pulpy??? I sliced and salted mine and let them sit for a while to get some of the moisture out.

Thankfully, these were not pulpy. If I was doing something other than breading and frying I would have salted them -- but they were good as is. Phew! :wink:

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That lemon meringue pie with the coconut crust is a dessert that will stay as a strong happy visual in my mind - and I am not a sweets person. Beautiful.

From your photos and narrative I am getting a real sense of how comfortable and natural the cooking techniques are to you. I love watching that "in action".

Thanks, Heidi.

It was nice having a 'lighter' dessert. Things made with matzo have a reputation for being heavy -- this was a great option. And the crust was very nice, though it's so easy to make macaroons making a crust from scratch wouldn't have taken long.

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Myers is still around as are some others, but none of them are kosher.

...

We're constantly seeing new people in the store, which always surprises me. But some of them are new to the city, new to kosher or they don't keep kosher but come in for specific things. A lot of our Russian/Israeli customers don't keep kosher but want all of the Israeli foods we bring in. It's interesting -- on any given day in different corners of the store you can here English, Hebrew, French, Spanish, Russian and Yiddish.

Ah, I was wondering about the delis, thanks for clearing that up. Sounds like you are providing a great community meeting place.


It's almost never bad to feed someone.

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This has been another fascinating look into another kitchen and a store too. I had no idea you had such a big business going on there. The ordering, the unloading, the stacking, the ORGANIZING.....the cooking and baking.

Thanks for the look into your food life.

Oy, we've already started talking about how we have to put the store back together when we re-open on Wednesday. All that non-Passover stuff that was packed away has to be re-organized and I have to start getting orders in!

Thanks for reading. :smile:

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Pam, I am lost in admiration for how you make so much work look so easy.

And I am seriously craving yesterday's dinner of latkes, lamb, and lemon meringue pie.

Thanks, Linda. I'm glad it looks easy, but I fell asleep for an hour after dinner. And I didn't even realize there was alliteration in last night's dinner. I think that may be how I plan meals from now on!

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Pam – I am thoroughly enjoying this week with you. I love that you work with your family – this would be a dream come true for me, especially if it centered around food. I am just amazed at your stamina – a week like this one with the added work of a blog and on top of all of that you are actually cooking at home, too! My heroine!

I, too, covet access to a band saw.

Aww. Thanks for your comments, Kim.

When I came home from university (I went to the U of Minnesota) I got a job working in a restaurant. After working eight 12-14 hour closing shifts in a row without a break (instead of the 4 I was told would be the max) I decided that if I was going to work my guts out, I should be doing it for the family business.

It can be tough -- we're all bull-headed, but I've never regretted the decision.

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Ah, I was wondering about the delis, thanks for clearing that up. Sounds like you are providing a great community meeting place.

It is. :smile: We just expanded this year and are trying to figure out if we can put a couple of tables and some chairs in so people can grab a quick bite and sit and schmooze.

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My mother has promised to cook dinner tomorrow night - a dish she tries to make once every year. That's as far as I've gotten -- thought I think it might be time to back something. We'll see how things look in the morning!

'night

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I have so enjoyed being in your world this week; I've learned so much about kosher/non-kosher cooking from you and your blogs. I am not doing as much Passover as in previous years; my chef friend moved on to a kosher catering company so he can't use my company but we stay in touch. There's been a huge influx of Passover items brought in by a local supermarket chain - stuff you couldn't get even three years ago (carrot cake mixes?! KfP confectioner's sugar - so now I can make meringues!) is on the shelf so I think a lot of people are doing things at home now that so much more is available. We've had a great week with you; hope you have had a great week with us! :wub:

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Pam, those kind of aubergines (eggplants) are often available in Asian stores. They are perfect for stuffing.

Oh. . stuffing. That would be great. I'll have to play around with them later. Thanks!

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Sorry I haven't posted much today. The thing I like least about self-publishing a cookbook is the accounting! I've been slugging through it and have more to do. But as I'm doing it I'm enjoying my salad. Crisp and cold. Mixed lettuces, strawberries, a very sweet white onion, toasted pecans and balsamic dressing. Oh - and that creamy sheep's feta that I love.

IMG00292-20110424-1304.jpg

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I also took 3 minutes to put a pot of compote on the stove.

IMG00293-20110424-1315.jpg

Assorted dried fruit, a sliced orange (you can use lemon), a little sugar and some cinnamon. I'd rather stick a cinnamon stick in the pot, but didn't have any, so ground it is! :hmmm:

IMG00294-20110424-1320.jpg

It's simmering slowly. More from me once the work is done.

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Pam, fantastic week and fantastic blog. I'm amazed at how you fit everything in your schedule! Also, please post pictures of your new condo's kitchen and the stools you ordered. I'm excited for you :)))

Thanks so much! I'm excited too.

I was hoping to get into the condo on Thursday so I could take some pictures, but apparently concrete was being poured and I couldn't get in.

The last time I thought to take pictures, my kitchen looked like this:

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Doesn't show you much. :hmmm:

From the corner, to the right, we'll have a sink, dishwasher, freezer and fridge. To the left, a range, wall oven/microwave and pantry. Big island in the middle. The picture on the right shows a big window on the other side of the island. I can picture it all in my head! The cabinets are sitting in my parents' garage waiting for the builders to take them. Any day now . . right? The plumbing and electrical is all in, the whole place is drywalled and taped and they're supposed to be painting this week.

Stools? These. Simple. But I'm already thinking that I might paint the bars. It's hard to find white stools.

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