• Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

  • product-image-quickten.png.a40203b506711f7664fc62024e54a584.pngDid you know that these all-volunteer forums are operated by the 501(c)3 not-for-profit Society for Culinary Arts & Letters? This holiday season, consider a tax-deductible Quick Ten Bucks to support the eG Forums and help us remain completely advertising-free. Thanks to all those who have donated so far!

Pam R

eG Foodblog: Pam R (2011) - Passover Part III

170 posts in this topic

!חג פסח שמח or Happy Passover!

This is not the first time I've done an eG Foodblog during Passover. It's hard to believe that the first one was in 2005 and the second one, just one year later in 2006. Since it's been 5 years since I last blogged, I thought it was time to do it again.

For those of you who don't know me, I live in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. If you take a look at this map of North America you'll find Winnipeg right in the center - about 100 km north of the US border (we border North Dakota and Minnesota) and dead centre between the east and west coasts of Canada.

I work in the family business - we call it Desserts Plus, but the emphasis is more on the Plus and less on the Desserts. We're kosher caterers and have a kosher food store in Winnipeg. Tomorrow (Monday, April 18th) marks the end of the 3 busiest weeks of the year for us -- we expect over 150 catering orders to go out over a 4 hour period, plus customers coming in for last-minute items before Passover starts tomorrow evening.

You probably won't hear much from me tomorrow -- unless there are some lulls during the day. But if you have any questions, please ask them! I'll get to them as soon as possible.

The plan for the week is a small seder dinner on Tuesday night and a lot of home-cooking over the holiday.

It's 11 PM and I have to go finish packaging the chopped liver -- I've been here since 8 AM and have to be back by 8 AM tomorrow - and there's still stuff to do before I go.

(This is about 1/3 of the 90 lbs. we made this year)

IMG00133-20110417-2045.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looking forward to the blog Pam.


Nick Reynolds, aka "nickrey"

"The Internet is full of false information." Plato
My eG Foodblog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It will be wonderful to spend this week with you--Happy Passover, Pam.

Wish I could grab one of those chopped liver packs :wub:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good morning! I'm not in bad shape here, so I thought I'd post before things get crazy.

Got to work about half an hour ago - and it's a crisp, clear day. (-4 C at the moment)

IMG00135-20110418-0802.jpg

Breakfast was at my desk. Very exciting breakfast too.

IMG00136-20110418-0807.jpg

Awww (I'm not sure I agree with the sticker . . but they weren't bad:

IMG00137-20110418-0809.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Speaking of matzo . . there are many brands and many types. Matzo is usually made with ingredients: flour and water. But you can get some made with egg, whole wheat, spelt, oats (gluten-free), extra bran, "lite" (thinner boards), handmade or machine made and it goes on.

Generally speaking, I like the Israeli brands (King David and Yehuda are the most popular brands we sell). But I'm partial to the Streit's spelt matzo.

Anybody have a favourite?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good Pesach to you, Pam! (Hope I said that right.) Great to see you blogging. :cool:

Generally speaking, I like the Israeli brands (King David and Yehuda are the most popular brands we sell). But I'm partial to the Streit's spelt matzo.

Interesting. I never know which brand to buy. Howard, who does not keep kosher, prefers egg matzoh and, ahem, chocolate covered matzoh. I like to buy Streit's, but will now check out one of the Israeli brands, assuming I can still find them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can't wait to follow along this week! I know almost nothing about Kosher food and/or Jewish food traditions...I'm excited to learn some new things.

:smile:


If you ate pasta and antipasto, would you still be hungry? ~Author Unknown

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pam, I understand that "kosher for Passover" is more strict than regular kosher rules, but that's as far as my knowledge goes. Could you explain the difference?


Janet A. Zimmerman, aka "JAZ"
Manager
jzimmerman@eGullet.org
eG Ethics signatory
Author, The Healthy Pressure Cooker Cookbook and All About Cooking for Two

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Speaking of matzo . . there are many brands and many types. Matzo is usually made with ingredients: flour and water. But you can get some made with egg, whole wheat, spelt, oats (gluten-free), extra bran, "lite" (thinner boards), handmade or machine made and it goes on.

Wow, whole wheat and spelt. I think I may have seen whole wheat but never spelt. I'll have to look and see if I can find some here. It's been ages since I've had matzo. I don't like warm butter and I remember from the 'peg the challenge of spreading cold butter on matzo without turning it back to flour!

I see your shop is in the hilly part of town :biggrin:


It's almost never bad to feed someone.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Happy Passover Pam!! Watching your preparations are making mine seem rather simple. Though I'm not hosting, I'm in charge of charoset, and horseradish as usual, as well as helping my hostess with the cooking at her house. We got together last Thursday evening and made the matzo balls for the soup, quinoa pilaf and banana "bread" for dessert. I made the horseradish on Friday. I'm finishing my charoset right now. One of our seder attendees (hostess' brother) is vegetarian so we try to accommodate as much as possible. Veggie broth in the soup, no schmaltz in the matzo balls, quinoa pilaf as a side, etc. She even made vegan gefilte "fish" for him this year with kelp granules, dulse, carrots and ground almonds. I'll let you know how that turned out... :unsure:

Looking forward to seeing the pictures of your seder. I'm certain it'll be mouthwatering!


Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Will be fascinated to experience your Seder via the blog, Pam. Anxious to learn about all kinds of food with which I'm not familiar!


Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good Pesach to you, Pam! (Hope I said that right.)

That works, thanks!

Interesting. I never know which brand to buy. Howard, who does not keep kosher, prefers egg matzoh and, ahem, chocolate covered matzoh. I like to buy Streit's, but will now check out one of the Israeli brands, assuming I can still find them.

We usually open a few boxes every year and let customers try them. Some people are loyalists -- they've used the same brand for 50 years and they're not going to change now! Some shop price -- in Canada the Israeli brands are all cheaper than the American (and just as good . . or better :wink: ) I have never been a fan of chocolate matzo - I don't remember ever having it growing up. Manischewitz came out with some new chocolate covered matzot this year -- one had dark AND milk chocolate on it (ohlala) and they also had small squares of matzo covered with mint flavoured chocolate. The mint chocolate was pretty good . . but it still had matzo in the center. :angry:

Can't wait to follow along this week! I know almost nothing about Kosher food and/or Jewish food traditions...I'm excited to learn some new things.

:smile:

If you have any questions, please ask! I'll try to cover some of it but I know I'll just touch the surface so let me know if you have any specific questions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For the record, the Ge-faux-te fish was pretty tasty. Not terribly fishy (and that's certainly not a bad thing) and colorful with a lot of texture. The perfect horseradish delivery system, which is exactly what it needed to be. The non-vegetarians all got a small piece alongside their traditional gefilte fish and everyone liked it enough to request it again for next year's festivities.

Rounding out our seder menu was the vegetarian matzo ball soup, salad, spinach kugel, vegetable casserole, Passover "stuffing", tomatoes Provencal, quinoa pilaf w/almonds and dried cranberries, and potato/horseradish crusted salmon and Balsamic chicken for the non-vegetarians. Dessert was macaroons of various sorts, a huge fruit salad, Passover biscotti and the banana bread we baked the other day. I'm feeling fat and happy.


Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You crazy fool, blogging during and after a massive holiday. :wink:

So what have you learned about the Passover crush since 2006?

Two peas in a pod, we are (though I'm not allowed to eat peas during Passover . . .)

Things have changed a lot in the last five years. Our business has changed -- the retail part of it is very different than it was 5 years ago. In 2006 we had just moved our store across town. We had a restaurant in the old location, not a retail store, and it took a couple of years to learn how to order and plan for Passover. The first couple of years I ordered so much matzo we were left with a few hundred pounds after the holiday. Right now there might be 100 lbs. left in the store -- and we're open on Thursday and Friday and will sell more. I've started writing notes for myself at the end of each season, telling me what to do next year. And a couple of years ago we put in a new cash register system that keeps track of all of the sales -- best thing ever.

The catering . . I don't know if I can tell you what's changed exactly, because things have changed slowly over the years, but I can tell you that things went really smoothly this year. Ten years ago we would be at work until 3 AM the night before Passover -- we'd be carving turkeys, decorating cakes, packaging and labeling and organizing the store. Then we'd be back by 7 AM to do the last-minute things before customers came to pick up their orders.

Last night, instead of 3 AM, we were all gone by 11:45 PM. Great staff that have been with us for years, cousins that have been coming in to help with Passover since they were teenagers -- it all helps.

It's still exhausting. :wink:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pam, I understand that "kosher for Passover" is more strict than regular kosher rules, but that's as far as my knowledge goes. Could you explain the difference?

That's right. The same rules that apply all year (no milk and meat cooked or eaten together, certain animals not allowed, some cuts of otherwise kosher animals not allowed, etc.) apply during Passover. But we also have restrictions against eating leavened bread and Chometz. We can't eat foods that are made from wheat, rye, oats, barley and spelt. Of course, we do eat things made from these grains (matzo being the most important) but they are prepared under special supervision following strict rules. The issue is that once flour made from any of these grains is mixed with water it has to be baked completely within 18 minutes. It's hard for a home cook to ensure that this happens, so we just eliminate flour completely for the week.

So, instead of using flour, we use matzo in various forms for cooking. Very finely ground matzo is called cake meal and is comparable to flour. Matzo meal is coarser and used where you would use breadcrumbs.

Now, there's another issue. For Jews of European decent (Ashkenazi), we have a tradition of not eating kitniyot. Things off limits during Passover because they are 'kitniyot' include beans, corn, rice, mustard , most seeds and their by-products (like oil).

That's a brief explanation -- I'm sure I'll say more over the week!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, whole wheat and spelt. I think I may have seen whole wheat but never spelt. I'll have to look and see if I can find some here. It's been ages since I've had matzo. I don't like warm butter and I remember from the 'peg the challenge of spreading cold butter on matzo without turning it back to flour!

I see your shop is in the hilly part of town :biggrin:

I know Melbourne has a large Jewish population but what's it like in your area? Can you find matzo in the local shops?

I'll talk more about why I pointed to the map of Canada later, but one of the reasons is that outside of Winnipeg it's hard to find kosher foods for hundreds of kilometers in any direction. We have customers in provinces on either side. :smile: And yes, it is the hilly part -- there's a bump in the road nearby. :wink:

For those of you who have never been here, Winnipeg may be the flattest place on earth (I don't know this as fact, but it must be). As soon as you drive beyond the city's perimeter during the growing season you can see fields of canola (developed here) and wheat for miles and miles in all directions.

Looking forward to seeing the pictures of your seder. I'm certain it'll be mouthwatering!

Once upon a time I went to seders on the first night. But people got sick of everybody in my immediate family falling asleep at the table. Today people kept saying "I hope you're not doing anything tonight" to us. How tired do you think we looked? :unsure: But tomorrow there will be a seder!

Put your feet up, Pam. I'm excited to see what you'll post tomorrow -- rest up now.

Thanks, Maggie. Lots to post tomorrow. With pictures and everything!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For the record, the Ge-faux-te fish was pretty tasty. Not terribly fishy (and that's certainly not a bad thing) and colorful with a lot of texture. The perfect horseradish delivery system, which is exactly what it needed to be. The non-vegetarians all got a small piece alongside their traditional gefilte fish and everyone liked it enough to request it again for next year's festivities.

Rounding out our seder menu was the vegetarian matzo ball soup, salad, spinach kugel, vegetable casserole, Passover "stuffing", tomatoes Provencal, quinoa pilaf w/almonds and dried cranberries, and potato/horseradish crusted salmon and Balsamic chicken for the non-vegetarians. Dessert was macaroons of various sorts, a huge fruit salad, Passover biscotti and the banana bread we baked the other day. I'm feeling fat and happy.

That sounds like a delicious menu! Chag sameach, Katie. We have no vegetarians at dinner tomorrow. . and there will be meat. Brisket anybody?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm turning in for the night, but I thought I should mention what I had for dinner. No pictures tonight -- and no cooking. From work: turkey with a mushroom/onion kugel and strawberries (that really tasted like strawberries!) and a toasted coconut and cocoa meringue for dessert.

Goodnight.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pam, I can't imagine how you manage everything in your normal workweeks, never mind adding a blog to a busy holiday like Passover! But, we are all fortunate you are making the effort for us!

So, you have about 100 pounds of matzoh left so far- how are other Passover items faring?

I ADORE Ashkenazi food- especially gefilte fish and matzoh balls!

We're hosting the second seder here at the Coop and tonight I finally taught my daughter how to make the Ashkenazi charoset that I love- with apples, cinnamon, raisins, walnuts and wine!

What kinds of charoset do you sell?


More Than Salt

Visit Our Cape Coop Blog

Cure Cutaneous Lymphoma

Join the DarkSide---------------------------> DarkSide Member #006-03-09-06

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chag Samauch, and why is pesachtikka cheese (here in UK its only Dutch Gouda) so bland and soapy?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

  • Similar Content

    • By sartoric
      We're 50 something Aussies who enjoy travelling, eating, cooking, markets, kitchen shops, cooking utensils, animals & plants (often food related), architecture & photography (both kitchens and food) and exploring different cultures (of which food is a big part). The trip was January 14 - February 6, it was just marvellous. My favourite meal is now masala dosa with sambar, I had many. Here's some highlights of the food.
       
      A late afternoon snack of Sichuan pepper squid was washed down with a beer at the Ajantha Seaview Hotel on the promenade in Pondicherry. It's a colonial building with a first floor terrace overlooking the colourful display of women in their finest, and the Bay of Bengal. We're here on a Monday public holiday for the Pongal festival, a four day celebration of the harvest, with many different ceremonies and traditions.
       
       

       
      A visual bonus, cows (and sometimes goats) get their horns painted and wear flower garlands or other decorations.

       
    • By Christy Martino
      Ciao!
       
      I'm Christine and I'm a born and bred New Yorker. I’m an Italian by blood (and at heart, of course) since my parents actually came from Italy. My father was from Sciacca, Sicily while my mother was from Sondrio, Lombardy. Despite coming from different regions, or because of it, love for food and cooking has been one of the mainstays in my family home life growing up. And I’ve always loved the dishes my parents prepared during special occasions, and even on regular days.
       
      And of course, I love cooking (and eating) Italian food and I have a few recipes from my mother, but I'd really love to collect some more, especially the traditional ones. And if anyone can contribute some historical background to each dish, that would be really great.
       
      Grazie mille!
    • By Chef Margie
      Hello Everyone!
       
      Happy to join eGullet in hopes to share my passion for culinary and kitchen with others. I have an Instagram account, but I don't think that is enough as I want to learn more, expand, and share my love for food with individuals who share the same passion.
       
      Here is a brief bio about myself: Born and raised in Los Angeles, CA by my Filipino parents. Having no brothers and sisters, I am very independent and surprisingly social with others but also love spending time on my own and with my boyfriend Louis, who is my kitchen partner in crime (this is how we actually met, working BOH at a local Vietnamese restaurant in LA). Having attended college majoring in accounting as an undergrad and grad, I orignally wanted to become a licensed accountant for finance and real estate, but it was not fulfilling and the content honestly bored me to death! I also desired to leave the corporate business world and join the professional kitchen. So I took the leap, graduated culinary school, quit my desk job, and worked in the professional kitchen. Then my health and finances took over, and I had surgery and I needed more money to survive in a city of ridiculous rent prices. I had to leave the kitchen and go back into accounting. Fast forward to 2017, I am currently unemployed having been laid off two days before Christmas the prior year! Using this as a sign and as an opportunity for self growth and realization, I am once again on the culinary path. Not necessarily to work on the line, but to learn more, cook and bake more at home, and expose myself out there to all things food and kitchen. Not also forgetting to mention I am always surrounded by food: Louis is also still in the professional kitchen, and we WILL have that restaurant one day (dreams DO come true, I just know it!).
       
      Anyhow, I am super excited to be posting here and exchanging ideas! See you out there! 
       
      Margie
    • By ElsieD
      We are at the airport waiting to board our flight.  As we seem to have interested folks from different parts of the world who may not know too much about our province,  I thought I would start this blog by giving you an overview of Newfoundland and Labrador (NL).
       
      Before Newfoundland  became part of Canada in 1949, it was a British Colony.  Cupids, a town on Conception Bay, was settled 406 years ago, and is the oldest continuously settled official British community in Canada.  Most of the early permanent settlers came from southwest England and southeast Ireland although  the French also settled here and in the 17th century Newfoundland was more French than English.  French is still spoken in Port au Port Penninsula, on the western side of the island, with English spoken everywhere else.   Just off the coast of south west Newfoundland, St. Pierre et Miquelon are islands that are still a colony of France.  There is a regular ferry service between Fortune, NL and St. Pierre et Miquelon.
       
      Geographically, the capital of St. John's is on the same latitude as Paris, France and Seattle, Washington.  In size, Newfoundland and Labrador is a little smaller than California, slightly bigger than Japan and twice the size of the United Kingdon.  NL covers 405,212 sq. kilometers (156,453 sq. miles) with over 29,000 kilometers (18,000 miles) of coastline.  By itself, the island of Newfoundland covers 111,390 square kilometers (43,008 sq. miles).
       
      The population of NL is 510,000, of whom 181,000 live in St. John's.  While there are some larger towns, vast areas are sparsely populated.
       
      In Newfoundland there are no snakes, skunks, racoons, poisonous insects or arachnids.  There is also no ragweed - allergy sufferers rejoice!  There are over 120,000 moose and it is home to one of the world's biggest caribou herds.   They also have some of the continent's biggest black bears.
       
      Note: This information was taken from the official Newfoundland and Labrador web site.
    • By chefmd
      My son married a lovely young lady from Yakeshi, Inner Mongolia, China.   Mongolian: ᠶᠠᠠᠠᠰᠢ ᠬᠣᠲᠠ (Ягши хот); Chinese: 牙克石; pinyin: Yákèshí
       
      We had a wedding in the US but her family also wanted to have a traditional wedding in China.  DH and I have never being to China so this was an exciting opportunity for us!  We spent a few days in Beijing doing touristy stuff and then flew to Hailar.  There is only one flight a day on Air China that we took at 6 in the morning.  Yakeshi is about an hour drive from Hailar on a beautiful toll road with no cars on it.  I wish we took pictures of free roaming sheep and cows along the way.  The original free range meat.
       
      The family met us at the airport.  We were greeted with a shot of a traditional Chinese spirit from a traditional leather vessel.  Nothing says welcome like a stiff drink at 9 AM.  We were supposed to have a three shots (may be they were joking) but family took pity on us and limited it to one only.
       

       
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.