Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Black Trumpet Mushrooms


Recommended Posts

I had to google the mushroom as I have never cooked them, but my first hit was salmon with creamy balck trumpet and ramps (!) sauce here. Sounds pretty good to me and I think you are getting ramps at your farmers market.

With a yellow chanterelle mushroom I also enjoy a prep with a touch of cream, butter, fresh snipped herbs, and garlic spooned on crusty sourdough bread slices. Perhaps that would apply to these. I will keep an eye out for the black trumpets.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I got four bunches of ramps. Two went into the tagliatelle dish that's currently posted on the blog (see the pic in the Ramps thread) and the other two are reserved for a surprise later this weekend.

I was looking through a couple of cookbooks. One features a mushroom galette, and while that's tempting, I don't nearly have enough on hand for that. But definitely one for the future.

Link to post
Share on other sites

With a yellow chanterelle mushroom I also enjoy a prep with a touch of cream, butter, fresh snipped herbs, and garlic spooned on crusty sourdough bread slices. Perhaps that would apply to these. I will keep an eye out for the black trumpets.

hmmmm

I can hear the gears in my brain turning.

thanks Heidi!

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll probably sauté some, along with morels and oyster mushrooms, with garlic, butter and herbs.

Sounds good. Toss in some bitter greens, nettles if you can find them, or other tender greens. Kale would be fine if you blanch it before sauteing to tenderize it. Then serve over soft creamy polenta. I tasted something like this at a local restaurant years ago. The combo of black trumpet mushrooms and polenta was delicious--that's what sticks in my memory.

Link to post
Share on other sites

It's not that different from what you're already thinking of, probably, but I like to prep mushrooms by bundling a couple of varieties into the centre of a square of aluminium foil, topping with a pat of butter and a drizzle of ponzu, a drop or two of sesame oil as well..and then folding the foil up into a tight parcel and setting it directly onto the hob of my gas stove, until you see some steam escaping. It kind of combo steams and scorches them, and the butter and ponzu melt into a great sauce.

Nice with fish, chicken, or over soba (!) noodles.

Link to post
Share on other sites

One of my favorite mushroom recipes is from an old Cuisine magazine from the late 70s or early 80s. Basically wild mushroomms sauteed with bacon and a bit of onion, served over polenta seasoned with parmesan, all topped with gremolata. The bright gremolata really brings out the earthiness of the mushrooms.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll probably sauté some, along with morels and oyster mushrooms, with garlic, butter and herbs.

Sounds good. Toss in some bitter greens, nettles if you can find them, or other tender greens. Kale would be fine if you blanch it before sauteing to tenderize it. Then serve over soft creamy polenta. I tasted something like this at a local restaurant years ago. The combo of black trumpet mushrooms and polenta was delicious--that's what sticks in my memory.

This sounds amazing. I want to make this!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Are black trumpets the same as black chanterelles? I've only had black chanterelles once, when I found a patch of them in the Berkeley Hills. That was years ago, but sauteed in butter and then mixed into scrambled eggs they were memorable. An omelet would be equally nice.

Unfortunately I paid a high price for mine, and that was a good case of poison oak, since the patch of mushrooms was inevitably growing amongst a mat of the other stuff.

Link to post
Share on other sites

a creamy sauce for beef or pork? Also if you cut them small and cook them nice and crisp - maybe with a bit of bacon - they would be great sprinkled over potatoes or country fries, over bitter greens or on a soup.

Lots of them in the Bay Area hills, but not easy to find, since they're so - well - black :-)

"And don't forget music - music in the kitchen is an essential ingredient!"

- Thomas Keller

Diablo Kitchen, my food blog

Link to post
Share on other sites

They're good in a risotto. I like the fact they are also called "trumpets of death". Clearly the most metal of the mushrooms. Nobody seems to call them that here though. I guess people get nervous when you combine mushrooms with the word death.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the ideas, all.

I'm trying to move away from defaulting to risotto and pasta. I don't like cream sauces. If you look at my foodblog, there aren't that many recipes that feature it.

I may do a wild mushroom custard, kind of like chawan-mushi or flan. I have some leftover mushrooms, so have to use those sometime this week.

As a side note, tonight's dinner will most likely be pan-roasted Arctic char, with morels and spinach. A visit to Citarella is in the offing later today -- hopefully they have asparagus, peas or pearl onions.

Getting back to black trumpets, a chef in Brooklyn features them in a dish with chicken cooked sous vide. I don't have that kind of set up at home (plus I think sous vide is really boring), but it got me to thinking what I can do regarding chicken and black trumpets. Roast chicken is way too much food, so it has to be something that's good for one or two dinners.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...