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jsmeeker

The Boulevardier cocktail

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jsmeeker   

I was introduced to this drink last night during a VERY rare weekday night out of drinking while NOT on vacation. The good thing about this outing was I was with a bunch of cocktail nerds like myself at a bar that does a pretty decent job of catering to us.

Anyway.. I was considering a drink and chatting with others. I wanted something bourbon based. Earlier, I had shared my fondness for Campari. So, they suggested a Boulevardier. It was made with Bourbon, Campari, and Sweet Vertmouth. Poking around a little suggests that it can be made with Rye, though my drinking companions suggested the drink made with rye had a different name. Also, I am not exactly sure on the ratios. I thought they had said "equal parts" since it was "like a Negroni, but with gin"

In any case, I thought it was tasty. And now I have another way to use Campari.

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Will   

You could also check out the Old Pal - essentially the same. Rye, Campari, sweet vermouth, more or less in equal parts.

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weinoo   

The Boulevardier is definitely a bourbon drink. When it moves into rye, then you're talking about a 1794 cocktail. With dry vermouth and rye, you've got an Old Pal.

I prefer a drink with unequal parts, too. Like 3:2:1 on the Boulevardier, as I find the equal parts is too heavy on the Campari and the bourbon has a hard time coming through.

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vice   

Mitch, those proportions are bourbon:vermouth:campari?

I think I first heard about the 1794 from Avery Glasser (here), who indicates that it also incorporates Bittermens mole bitters, but I can't find any substantiation of that in recipes published elsewhere on the web.

eta: It's a nice drink, either way. The Negroni is the gift that keeps on giving, and is rivaled in that respect perhaps only by the Manhattan.

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weinoo   

Yes, Dave. And the mole bitters work just fine! Of course, the proportions are play with-able.

1794 - via Dominic in SF at Range:

1 1/2 oz Rye

3/4 oz Sweet Vermouth

3/4 oz Campari

1-2 dash Xocolatl Mole Bitter

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If you use the right bourbon 1 oz per 3/4 of the other two ingredients is nice, I find. I like something wheated and high proof here--Old Weller 107 is my go-to. With a high rye bourbon I'd agree you probably need more. Not sure why.

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weinoo   

You could also check out the Old Pal - essentially the same. Rye, Campari, sweet vermouth, more or less in equal parts.

I think the Old Pal is dry vermouth.

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Will   

I think the Old Pal is dry vermouth.

Yeah - as pointed out above, I was totally wrong on that part.

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I've never been a fan of the Boulevardier even though I love Campari. I use Ted Haigh's ratios from Vintage Spirits and Forgotten cocktails (1.5:1:1 bourbon:campari:sweet vermouth). It is somewhat tolerable with a maraschino cherry garnish, but for me the bourbon and Campari clash big time. Overall it tastes very sweet and intensely bitter. It feels harsh and doesn't have a pleasant finish.

I liked the 1794 (on the right in the photo) much better. It was a more harmonious cocktail with a slow build-up where the spice was followed by orange flavors and then mellowed into a bitter chocolate finish (I used the mole bitters).

8593253619_4abcf40888_z.jpg

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Rafa   

The Old Pal is very good when made with Gran Classico instead of Campari. (Not sure whether that merits a new name. Old Buddy? New Pal? Pen Pal?)

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weinoo   

I think they're both fine drinks, but that's just me. Adjusting the ratios, different sweets, etc. all make for a slightly different cocktail.

For instance, I like my 1794 2 to 1 to .5.

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@frog - That Cocchi Vermouth di Torino is quite sweet. That might be what tips you over the edge on a Boulevardier. That said, I agree that the 1794 is even better.

You could try a Perfect Boulevardier to see if that makes it more to your liking.

... wait, you said "intensely bitter" like that's a bad thing. :huh:

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@frog - That Cocchi Vermouth di Torino is quite sweet. That might be what tips you over the edge on a Boulevardier. That said, I agree that the 1794 is even better.

You could try a Perfect Boulevardier to see if that makes it more to your liking.

... wait, you said "intensely bitter" like that's a bad thing. :huh:

I tried the Boulevardier (Ted Haigh ratios) with different vermouths in the past and was not sold either. This was just the latest attempt. I try to keep an open mind and regularly revisit these cocktails that I am supposed to like. :smile:

I like (love) intensely bitter but it has to work with the other components. I did not like intensely bitter with the bourbon, it just clashed for me. Just not my thing.

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brinza   

For me, wheras the Negroni is crisp and bracing, I find the Boulevarddier to be warm and spicy. I probably drink more of the former than the latter, but I love 'em both.

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weinoo   

A less bitter cocktail which we found ourselves returning to again and again this winter (and ala Sam as well) is the Grandfather...

1 bourbon / 1 Applejack BIB / 1 Antica / dash peychauds / dash ango / cherry garnish

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The Old Pal is very good when made with Gran Classico instead of Campari. (Not sure whether that merits a new name. Old Buddy? New Pal? Pen Pal?)

Hipster Pal? ;)

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The Old Pal is very good when made with Gran Classico instead of Campari. (Not sure whether that merits a new name. Old Buddy? New Pal? Pen Pal?)

Hipster Pal? ;)

Seems a bit too obvious but perhaps Gran/Grand Pal? or Classic Pal?


Edited by tanstaafl2 (log)

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Rafa   

The Old Pal is very good when made with Gran Classico instead of Campari. (Not sure whether that merits a new name. Old Buddy? New Pal? Pen Pal?)

Hipster Pal? ;)

Oh, the Old Pal? Yeah, I liked it back when it was the New Pal.

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Rafa   

The Old Pal is very good when made with Gran Classico instead of Campari. (Not sure whether that merits a new name. Old Buddy? New Pal? Pen Pal?)

Hipster Pal? ;)

Seems a bit too obvious but perhaps Gran/Grand Pal? or Classic Pal?

Grand Old Pal's good, if a little Republican-leaning.

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