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My last -- and anyone's best -- shot at elBulli


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I've landed back in the land of CDMA. Now it's just a question of clearing customs, getting home and doing a little editing work. Give me about 3 hours.

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Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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The line at passport control is staggeringly long. It may be a little longer than I thought.

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Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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Rest, spend time with the family and your reports can wait until those tasks are done. While I (and everyone) are anxious to enjoy the experience through your words, photos and postings, I am willing to wait until your full report.

Welcome home from your whirlwind. To quote a classic western, you may be the whirlingest dervish of them all!

"A cloud o' dust! Could be most anything. Even a whirling dervish.

That, gentlemen, is the whirlingest dervish of them all." - The Professionals by Richard Brooks

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I wrote everything on the plane. It's just a question of finding a wide enough pipe for the photos.

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Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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Here's an attempt to upload a cell phone photo of the elBulli kitchen. More later.

aeff712a-fba1-69f0.jpg

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Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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That table is the pass. The photo was taken from a seat at our table.

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Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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I just opened this thread for the first time because I assumed it was just a discussion about el bulli closing this year--was I wrong! Just read it all. Amazing photo essay, thank you. I teach a business case on el bulli in my Innovation class,and next year plan to try to incorporate some food prep, maybe with a guest, and a chem lesson. This has inspired me!

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We too are waiting with baited breath for the final installment. I had the well-intentioned but ill-conceived idea of going to JFK airport to pick Steven up, something we never do for the following reason--P.J. and I sat in traffic for over 2 hours trying to get to the airport. At first, Steven wisely declined our offer to get him at the airport but after seeing the line at customs he called and said "sure, come get me."

Then Steven stood waiting for us with no WiFi outside of terminal 3, arrival area D at JFK. Every time we watched an AirTrain go by P.J. and I said to each other "well, Daddy could be on that train on his way back into the city."

Of course, by the time we collected Steven (after going to the wrong terminal--the helpful staff at JFK informed Steven that he was at Terminal D) the traffic in the other direction was just as bad as when we headed out to the airport.

Hopefully, after presenting PJ with his candy treat, FG will plug in his computer and fill us in!

Ellen Shapiro

www.byellen.com

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Good to know that he has arrived and is at home! (And again, though I hate to say it: If he needs a rest, let him have it. I suppose, however, that he is just as eager to tell as we are to read.)

Charles Milton Ling

Vienna, Austria

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