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My last -- and anyone's best -- shot at elBulli


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I keep thinking about what I want to ask Ferran Adria to sign. I'm actually thinking about bringing a silver paint pen and having him (and the others in this group) sign my Toshiba laptop computer.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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Forget Can Roca, go to Can Fabes.

Unfortunately, Santi Santamaria passed away not long ago. That's another experience I kick myself for missing out on. But this particular itinerary emphasizes modernism, which is not really part of the proffer at Can Fabes.

I believe the restaurant is still open, but yes I was very sad when I heard the news. I was thinking about the contrast of styles.. both being 3* in the same area Tradition and Modernism. El Raco de Can Fabes (book) was my treasure upon coming home from my stage in San Sebastian. Man can not live on foam alone :wink:

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Man can not live on foam alone :wink:

I'm tempted to try! But, I don't think they've served foam at elBulli in years.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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1. My envy knows no bounds.

2. It's been said by others in this thread, but you have the BEST. WIFE. EVER.

3. I wouldn't have them sign your computer. Murphy's Law says it will die as soon as you have them sign it.

Have fun!

Grace

Grace Piper, host of Fearless Cooking

www.fearlesscooking.tv

My eGullet Blog: What I ate for one week Nov. 2010

Subscribe to my 5 minute video podcast through iTunes, just search for Fearless Cooking

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FG

You are fortunate and blessed on many levels. Nathanm is a most generous person to have included you and the others on this field trip-imagine the stories that will be spawned and retold over the years from this one event. Your family is equally gracious in encouraging you to drop all else and book plans at such a late date. Finally, your character is exemplified by the original thought of not leaving your planned move date.

Please have the time of a lifetime for all of us. Travel safely.

"A cloud o' dust! Could be most anything. Even a whirling dervish.

That, gentlemen, is the whirlingest dervish of them all." - The Professionals by Richard Brooks

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I hope we could get Iuzzini's feedback on Roca's desserts. Jordi Roca, the youngest brother, is one of the most talented pastry chefs I know. He, Alex Stupak and then perhaps Albert Adria as a distant third, when he was still playing this game. But then the same can be said about Stupak, I guess...

Chances are that on a first visit elBulli will rock your socks off. Don't underrate Can Roca, easily the most solid restaurant in Spain right now --and for several years!

PedroEspinosa (aka pedro)

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The nice thing about Can Roca is that if I love it I can go back some day.

I'm still disoriented from the suddenness of these plans. Tonight when I was out parking the car I couldn't even perform basic navigation around a neighborhood I've known for 40+ years. I don't really know what my expectations of elBulli are or should be. I think it's probably good that I won't have much time to think about it in advance.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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I have indeed been resisting the temptation to see what's being served there this season. I've been told this thing and that by various people who've been there but most of it will be a surprise for me.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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I posted this the other day to a friend on her way to Israel for the first time:

"I wish you open eyes, open ears, open mind and open heart for this adventure! Enjoy!"

AND take copious notes and photos!

Best,

Heidi

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You are going to have an amazing couple of days!! Look forward to the reports. Can Roca is great. We had a five hour lunch last October that I will remember a long time.

Also great lunch at Comerç 24.

El Bulli will just be over the top fantastic.

Think of all of us. :)

Llyn Strelau

Calgary, Alberta

Canada

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Wow! What a great opportunity, and what great people to share the table with...have a wonderful time, and I can't wait for the pictures!

If you ate pasta and antipasto, would you still be hungry? ~Author Unknown

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I woke up this morning thinking omigosh I'm going to Spain tomorrow. It all seems so surreal, which I guess is appropriate for a visit to Adria in the land of Dali.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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There has been a lot of email chatter about the daytime plans for Friday and Saturday. La Boqueria and Pinotxo seem like high priorities for everyone. Two of the others in the party are on my flight tomorrow night, so I'm sure we'll coordinate schedules. Also mentioned has been Calpep, which Johnny calls "every chef's favorite seafood restaurant in Barcelona." We also may try to look in on Albert Adria's new tapas bar if the schedule allows. In addition, I'd like to try to do some walking and I need to carve out some chunks of computer time. I guess I'll sleep when I'm dead.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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We also may try to look in on Albert Adria's new tapas bar if the schedule allows. In addition, I'd like to try to do some walking and I need to carve out some chunks of computer time.

Of course, in that neighborhood there is also Quimet et Quimet.

Ummm, need I mention Jamonisimo?

Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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That's the problem: so many things I need to see and eat in order to cure my cultural illiteracy about Spain; so little time. Every hour I learn about ten more days worth of stuff I need to do.

So far I've accounted for three of our party of six: me, Nathan M., and Johnny I. Let me also introduce Dr. Tim Ryan, the president of the Culinary Institute of America. Dr. Ryan's list of accomplishments is overwhelming, but for me personally his great contribution has been producing the ProChef series of books (the full, correct title of the current edition is, I believe, The Professional Chef). ProChef in its various editions has for years been the most heavily utilized cookbook in my collection. I'm looking forward to spending a little time with Dr. Ryan.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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There has been a lot of email chatter about the daytime plans for Friday and Saturday. La Boqueria and Pinotxo seem like high priorities for everyone. Two of the others in the party are on my flight tomorrow night, so I'm sure we'll coordinate schedules. Also mentioned has been Calpep, which Johnny calls "every chef's favorite seafood restaurant in Barcelona." We also may try to look in on Albert Adria's new tapas bar if the schedule allows. In addition, I'd like to try to do some walking and I need to carve out some chunks of computer time. I guess I'll sleep when I'm dead.

CalPep is a must! It is beyond fantastic. Unfortunately unless you can reserve the back room, getting a large party in there with the bar-style seating will be close to impossible.

La Boqueria is also a must. Great place to have a mid-day snack or lunch.

As I understand, Ferran and Albert have a couple of new ventures, 41º a cocktail bar with traditional El Bulli snacks and La Vida Tapa which is tapas style restaurant, but I understand you need to buy tickets online ala Grant Achatz's Next model, http://www.ticketsbar.es/en

Have fun and I wish I was joining you.

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I'm looking forward to spending a little time with Dr. Ryan.

On top of it all, Dr. Ryan and his wife are all-around good people. With all the things to do, see and eat and such a short span of time, don't you think an assistant might be in order? :biggrin:

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Yes I am on calorie restriction this week!

I recommend that you starve yourself from now until you get there....

Sent from my Droid using Tapatalk

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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