Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Chicken Skin - Do You or Don't You?


weinoo
 Share

Recommended Posts

I learned a technique for braised chicken with crisp skin from a cookbook I had years ago, which I've used in other recipes like one for chicken braised in sherry vinegar sauce (photo here -- scroll down a bit).

You start out with a regular braising technique, but first, make sure the chicken is placed skin side up and not covered with the sauce, and second, halfway through the cooking, turn the heat up and take the cover off. The skin recrisps and the sauce reduces, and you end up with braised chicken with crisp skin.

(Here is the full recipe for anyone who's interested.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When I do something like a gumbo, or a stew or soup, where the skin is integral to the flavor of the final dish,

How is it integral? Do you mean that stewing the skin with the broth infuses the liquid with extra flavor? I've always been unsure of that, and believed that most of the flavor comes from meat and connective tissue.

I've read that it does, though I can't vouch for the flavor boost. For sure it gives it extra fat for that unctuous and silky mouthfeel (lord, how I hate that term, but it does describe the sensation...) in the liquid that's the mark of a good gumbo. And it does seem to keep the white meat from drying out during a long braise.

For those dishes where I'm going to shred the meat off the bones before serving, no big whup to keep the skin on and discard. For those dishes where the pieces are served whole in the broth, then they get the braise-skin-up-run-under-the-broiler treatment. Both work for me.

--Roberta--

"Let's slip out of these wet clothes, and into a dry Martini" - Robert Benchley

Pierogi's eG Foodblog

My *outside* blog, "A Pound Of Yeast"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I learned a technique for braised chicken with crisp skin from a cookbook I had years ago, which I've used in other recipes like one for chicken braised in sherry vinegar sauce (photo here -- scroll down a bit).

You start out with a regular braising technique, but first, make sure the chicken is placed skin side up and not covered with the sauce, and second, halfway through the cooking, turn the heat up and take the cover off. The skin recrisps and the sauce reduces, and you end up with braised chicken with crisp skin.

(Here is the full recipe for anyone who's interested.)

Thanks for this! I'm going to do this with turkey thighs for dinner tonight.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well before, I used to eat everything and I don't care how the skin of the chicken looks like or taste like. But as of the moment, when I eat a chicken, I don't eat the skin anymore because of some health/calorie issue. :) AnnaN's chicken skin looks perfect for me! :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

One of my favorite ways to prepare chicken is to put a few legs and a few thighs in a roasting pan, sprinkle liberally with Bisquick, salt and pepper. Talk about crispy skin!

Chris

Cookbooks are full of stirring passages

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Pretty much always.

I get comprehensive blood work done twice a year (includes cholesterol, hdl and ldl counts). Numbers are amazingly low ... I figure that when it's my turn to go, it won't be chicken skin that does me in.

My absolute favorite way (okay, 2nd favorite way) is as a topping in congee. But nothing beats the Zuni chicken - bread salad or Keller's roast chicken. I'm getting hungry just thinking about it.

Edited by SobaAddict70 (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The thought of even eating skin makes me gag a little. CaliPoutine

Maybe we should all put a little more thought into what it is we are eating. We might have lower levels of morbid obesity in this country.

I don't know about that. I've met a lot of people who think a lot about what they eat (and whom I would label "picky eaters", or at least "high maintenance eaters"), and they're quite a bit larger than I am. And I'm not small (short, but definitely not thin).

However, when it comes to the stuff that a chicken's feathers used to be anchored in, first plunge it in a bath of some briny buttermilk concoction for an extended period, then dust it with flour, and finally send it to a vat of oil heated to a blistering 150 C & keep it there until it is nicely browned and scrumptiously crisp.

I love the stuff that Alex & Aki do at Ideas in Food. Here are their thoughts on the subject.

Ditto on the fried chicken skin, except I'll often just dust it with cornstarch and fry it straight. If you're eating it immediately, I think corn starch makes it oh-so-much crispier.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The only thing better than crispy chicken skin is crispy duck skin with that little layer of fat. :smile:

And the only thing better than crispy duck skin is peking duck - pure roasted duck skin + fat, smeared with a bit of hoisin, sliver of scallion, and wrapped in a flour crepe. Soooo good...

I wonder how one might go about making "peking" chicken skin....hmmmm... :hmmm:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

chicken skins.jpg

Like money in the bank :laugh:

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

Had free range chicken, that I boned out( this is one of those questionable nomenclatures.. the breast bone was remove and the ribs are intacted ) and sous vide two breast @ 155 for 4 hrs.. Wow I usually don't eat skin.. but I couldn't help eating this stuff..

Edited by Paul Bacino (log)

Its good to have Morels

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...