Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Honey


Jaymes

Recommended Posts

I wouldn't consider it either, but I was going to wait for at least one of the professionals to weigh in before throwing in my 2 cents.

 

Beeswax wouldn't be an enjoyable addition, but also has an ignition temp that is pretty low when melted. It's not something I would want to put in a deep fryer for sure.

> ^ . . ^ <

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, keychris said:

you want to put honeycomb (with wax) into a dough? I'm not sure of the edibility of beeswax, I'm sure it pass straight through but ... I'd rather not.

 

Beeswax is perfectly edible.  Comb honey on good bread with salted butter is one of the greatest breakfasts.  Beeswax is also traditionally used to grease cannelé moulds.

 

Not sure about putting it in a doughnut though.  But then again, I've never heard of any sort of honey being put into a doughnut.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, Thanks for the Crepes said:

Beeswax wouldn't be an enjoyable addition, but also has an ignition temp that is pretty low when melted. It's not something I would want to put in a deep fryer for sure.

 

I wouldn't think that would be a problem, considering that there would just be a small amount mixed with all the moisture and other ingredients in the dough.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 year later...

yet again this morning I had to microwave my plastic container of honey because it had solidified.

I don't use it often so it hardens quickly.

I wish there were a way to keep it liquid similar to the brown sugar containers that keep the contents soft.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, crystallization is one of the ways you can tell it's REAL honey. I don't like heating stuff in plastic, so I typically transfer liquid honey to a jar after I buy it. That way, I can pop it in a bain-marie to reliquify or stick it in the microwave like you did. I prefer bain-marie, as I don't have the knack of heating things just so much in the microwave.

 

Creamed honey is crystallized, too, just with fine-grained crystals.

Tracy

Lenexa, KS, USA

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just bought 4 lbs of unpasteurized honey and 4 lbs of creamed unpasteurized honey from a semi-local producer. Someone from one of the local schools takes orders this time every year as a fundraiser, picks it up from the producer and delivers it. So I get good honey for a fair price and help out the school. I have a game plan for part of it involving chocolates so hopefully it won't be around long enough to worry about storage. Although, based on the above comments, I'm now curious about what differences there may be between them over time. Probably not curious enough to experiment though...

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 5 years later...

I'm looking for a high quality, unadulterated, pure honey with a mild flavor to use in some recipes. I've read that much of the commercial honey isn't real, or has been cut with other sweeteners, and I definitely want to stay away from such products.  Any suggestions?

 

I'm considering Tupelo honey, which I recall as being quite mild.  Is my memory accurate?
 

 ... Shel


 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've never had tupelo honey, so can't comment on that. However, I will note that given your location there should be plenty of unadulterated locally produced honeys: whether from citrus, clover, or other local crops. In my current location it's pretty easy to come by Sonoran Desert honey. Although you're several hundred miles away, I wouldn't be surprised to see it in some of your local stores. And yes, it's mild stuff, with good flavor.

 

Are the farmers' markets up and running in your area yet?

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

Follow us on social media! Facebook; instagram.com/egulletx; twitter.com/egullet

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)
"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

Link to comment
Share on other sites

did the Berkley Bowl run out of honey ?

 

used to be able to bring your own container

 

and pick your own vat.

 

and pay by weight.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The local honeys that I've tried don't have the flavor profile I'm seeking. That's not saying there's none that do, but I've not yet found what I'm looking for.

 

A friend who lives about 50 miles north of me just recommended a honey and beekeeping supplier near her home. They have a good selection of guaranteed unadulterated honeys, including Tupelo from a good location in Florida.  I'm going to drive up there within the week and taste honeys and get an education.

 

Now that you mention the Sonoran Desert, I realize that I have a friend who lives in the area in Mexico. I'm sure she can be of some help.

 

Thanks. You've been more helpful than you know.

Edited by Shel_B (log)
  • Like 1

 ... Shel


 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 minutes ago, rotuts said:

did the Berkley Bowl run out of honey ?

 

The issue for me is that I don't know the quality and purity of their honey. 

 

“There is more honey being sold each year than existing bee populations are capable of producing and from some countries which don’t even have the climate or floral resources to produce large volumes of honey,” said Arturo Carrillo, coordinator of the Honey Authenticity Project, which estimates that about a third of worldwide honey imports could be counterfeit.

 

Edited by Shel_B (log)

 ... Shel


 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I generally buy honey at my local farmers market. Most of the honey vendors at our markets will let you taste and compare their honeys and are usually quite happy to tell you about them.

Orange blossom honey is my default for a mildly flavored honey.  I buy cherry blossom honey at a cherry orchard and save that for "special" since I can only get it once a year when they are open for cherry picking. Its flavor is mild and quite delicate.  I like to keep buckwheat and/or avocado honey around for their stronger flavors. 

 

Edited to add that if the market is a certified California farmers market, the rules are pretty strict about about requiring vendors to verify that they grow or make what they sell so you shouldn't have to worry about imported honey.  Some markets have space for ancillary vendors but they should be clearly marked.  And then there are farmers markets that aren't certified and people can sell or re-sell all sorts of stuff.  I don't go to that type of market. 

Edited by blue_dolphin (log)
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

33 minutes ago, blue_dolphin said:

Edited to add that if the market is a certified California farmers market, the rules are pretty strict about about requiring vendors to verify that they grow or make what they sell so you shouldn't have to worry about imported honey. 

That's good to know. I don't think I knew that, although I should have. Thanks!

 ... Shel


 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I started keeping bees over 10 years ago.  I was beeless for a while, but I got back into it last year and am very much looking forward to being able to harvest my own honey again.  I definitely encourage looking local, but it is possible that you are looking for a flavor profile that is not available locally. 

 

Can you name what you are looking for flavorwise? (I know this can be challenging in a product whose flavors you are not used to dissecting).  Where I am, Black Locust honey is very prominent, and has a pretty light flavor.  Still not as light as the Poplar honey that could be found in the area as well.  My favorite honey though, came from a wild queenless hive that was found in a shed on property I owned in Maryland that had an almost anisey flavor.  I still have no idea what the nectar source of that honey was!

Edited by donk79 (log)
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My input can't help you, as I live in South Africa, but just talking about honey makes me happy. We can get some absolutely extraordinary honey's here. The two that have rocked my world the most are one from a local vendor that mixed honey from wild hives in the Highveld. Every time you tasted it you got a different flowery kind of flavor. 

 

And the other, my absolute favorite, was Blue Gum or Eucalyptus honey. They range from very mild to very potent, but they are all truly incredible. Honey so good you go looking for excuses to use it.

 

And of course, being in South Africa, with the ever present Rooibos tea, honey is the perfect (and in my not so humble opinion, only acceptable) accompaniment. Honey really brings Rooibos to life. 

  • Like 3

PastaMeshugana

"The roar of the greasepaint, the smell of the crowd."

"What's hunger got to do with anything?" - My Father

My first Novella: The Curse of Forgetting

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Tupelo honey is delicious, and relatively expensive. I save mine for drizzling. As others have recommended, go local.

"There is no sincerer love than the love of food."  -George Bernard Shaw, Man and Superman, Act 1

 

"Imagine all the food you have eaten in your life and consider that you are simply some of that food, rearranged."  -Max Tegmark, physicist

 

Gene Weingarten, writing in the Washington Post about online news stories and the accompanying readers' comments: "I basically like 'comments,' though they can seem a little jarring: spit-flecked rants that are appended to a product that at least tries for a measure of objectivity and dignity. It's as though when you order a sirloin steak, it comes with a side of maggots."

 

"...in the mid-’90s when the internet was coming...there was a tendency to assume that when all the world’s knowledge comes online, everyone will flock to it. It turns out that if you give everyone access to the Library of Congress, what they do is watch videos on TikTok."  -Neil Stephenson, author, in The Atlantic

 

"In questions of science, the authority of a thousand is not worth the humble reasoning of a single individual." -Galileo Galilei, physicist and astronomer

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Seems Tupelo honey is available on Amazon in Canada, should be available in US as well - and of course Amazon is close to everybody 😀

 

p

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, palo said:

Seems Tupelo honey is available on Amazon in Canada, should be available in US as well - and of course Amazon is close to everybody 😀

 

It seems to be fairly easy to come by in my area ...

Edited by Shel_B (log)

 ... Shel


 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Alex said:

Tupelo honey is delicious, and relatively expensive. I save mine for drizzling. As others have recommended, go local.

Not very expensive here, just a dollar or two more than clover honey for the same size container at the beekeeping supply shop that I mentioned.

 ... Shel


 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For the last three years, I've received regular supplies of free lychee honey from my friend whose family are lychee farmers and beekeepers. It is lovely stuff.

 

2062516827__20210420224159.thumb.jpg.b89bee448e518617b04a78f36bb6f4b7.jpg.b70bc368a67612434e2b008d85a6c86f.jpg

 

  • Like 2

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

"No amount of evidence will ever persuade an idiot"
Mark Twain

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

Link to comment
Share on other sites

×
×
  • Create New...