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Fat Guy

Help, I need to buy a real pro shaker

130 posts in this topic

I don't have Koriko tins (at least I don't think I do -- I bought them at Boston Shaker), and I can't afford CK's Koriko strainer, but I can attest that a pair of tins seals better for dry shaking than I've been able to achieve with a tin and a pint mixing glass. They are also easily separated by squeezing, rather than smacking. My carpal tunnel appreciates this.

I haven't been anointed with egg white since I switched. I need need a new hawthorne spring though, since one visited the disposer.


Kindred Cocktails | Craft + Collect + Concoct + Categorize + Community

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For those dry shaking with a tin and pint glass, a single shaken ice cube helps create a seal without diluting too much during emulsification.

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DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

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However, if you're short on barware, I'd recommend the Koriko tins paired with their Fine Strainer - which is excellent

I have been experimenting with some basic dry shake drinks lately (Ramos Gin Fizz, Morgenthalers Amaretto Sour). I have a no-name boston shaker, and when I dry shake there's more than a little leakage between the tin and glass. Would the Koriko tins give me an improvement on this?

Strainer looks nice but might have to wait until payday: http://www.cocktailkingdom.com/Koriko-Hawthorne-Strainer-Stainless-Steel-p/str_korikohawx_0000_stl.htm

I purchased the Koriko weighted tins from Cocktail Kingdom and they are great. no leaks. I had to learn how to break the seal on them after a few struggles.

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My Koriko tins finally arrived - and wonderful they are too. I umm-ed and arr-ed a good while before purchasing, but unlike the bottle of Fernet I picked up last night, I can see me using them a lot. A good excuse for another drink...

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However, if you're short on barware, I'd recommend the Koriko tins paired with their Fine Strainer - which is excellent

I have been experimenting with some basic dry shake drinks lately (Ramos Gin Fizz, Morgenthalers Amaretto Sour). I have a no-name boston shaker, and when I dry shake there's more than a little leakage between the tin and glass. Would the Koriko tins give me an improvement on this?

Strainer looks nice but might have to wait until payday: http://www.cocktailkingdom.com/Koriko-Hawthorne-Strainer-Stainless-Steel-p/str_korikohawx_0000_stl.htm

I purchased the Koriko weighted tins from Cocktail Kingdom and they are great. no leaks. I had to learn how to break the seal on them after a few struggles.

I'm still learning to break the seal after hundreds of uses....

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I purchased the Koriko weighted tins from Cocktail Kingdom and they are great. no leaks. I had to learn how to break the seal on them after a few struggles.

I'm still learning to break the seal after hundreds of uses....

I have two sets of Koriko tins from Cocktail Kingdom and they break open without any effort. The key is to wait a few seconds after shaking, then they pop open very easily.
Edited by FrogPrincesse (log)

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These make the world of difference on a dry shake! Not only did my whiskey sour come out nice and frothy, but most of it ended up in the glass rather than over me. Next step - Ramos Gin Fizz.

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1797409_10100377048014582_1597843284_n.j

Requiescat in pace, my dear recipe-spangled, glass-hewn, decidedly un-pro shaker. I awoke to find you in pieces with an apology attached from my dear roommate, written on what I can only assume was the dirtiest piece of paper he could find. It looks like I will finally have to invest in a real pro shaker.

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DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

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I am a stubborn and foolish man, and I will not trade up unless I'm made to.

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DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

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Finer spirits make for finer cocktails. Finer mixing glasses have no noticeable effect, at least not in double-blind studies.

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Matthew Kayahara

Kayahara.ca

@mtkayahara

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Requiescat in pace, my dear recipe-spangled, glass-hewn, decidedly un-pro shaker. I awoke to find you in pieces with an apology attached from my dear roommate, written on what I can only assume was the dirtiest piece of paper he could find. It looks like I will finally have to invest in a real pro shaker.

Oh no! A true classic. Did it have the rubber seal around the top? I hope you at least got all the recipes transcribed to Kindred Cocktails, first.

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It's almost never bad to feed someone.

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Sooooo, after several months of happy use with the Koriko set, I've come to notice something. Nearly every serious bar in DC that uses a metal-on-metal shaker is using some combination of shakers such that the smaller one protrudes a mere 2-3 inches above the top of the larger one, allowing for easy one handed-shaking. I don't know if it's a larger large tin or a smaller small one, or just different diameter openings. My small Koriko fits deeper down into a large non-Koriko weighted tin that I have, but the latter isn't as high quality as the large Koriko one and doesn't seal quite as well. 

 

Anyone know of any quality all-metal Boston shaker sets that allow for easy one handed shaking? Having done several bar-style cocktail events now, I'm seeing the benefit to be able to shake up 2 servings of 2 different drinks at the same time. 

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Sooooo, after several months of happy use with the Koriko set, I've come to notice something. Nearly every serious bar in DC that uses a metal-on-metal shaker is using some combination of shakers such that the smaller one protrudes a mere 2-3 inches above the top of the larger one, allowing for easy one handed-shaking. I don't know if it's a larger large tin or a smaller small one, or just different diameter openings. My small Koriko fits deeper down into a large non-Koriko weighted tin that I have, but the latter isn't as high quality as the large Koriko one and doesn't seal quite as well. 

 

Anyone know of any quality all-metal Boston shaker sets that allow for easy one handed shaking? Having done several bar-style cocktail events now, I'm seeing the benefit to be able to shake up 2 servings of 2 different drinks at the same time. 

 

Never had a problem with one-handed shaking on the Koriko weighted set I have from Cocktail Kingdom. That said, I'm 6'4", so I may be the exception.

 

ETA: The setup you describe seeing in bars sounds pretty similar to the one Toby describes here. So, perhaps be on the look out for 'Royal' brand weighted tins.


Edited by KD1191 (log)

True rye and true bourbon wake delight like any great wine...dignify man as possessing a palate that responds to them and ennoble his soul as shimmering with the response.

DeVoto, The Hour

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I'm 6'1" but my hands are not especially large. I CAN one hand shake with the Korikos, but it doesn't feel stable at all.

 

That Royal set described in that like is 16 and 33 oz, vs 18 and 28 of the Koriko, so I will definitely keep an eye out

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I've always nominally preferred the Naranja tins to the Koriko for one handed shaking. The diameter is slightly smaller.

 

They still carry them at Umamimart.

 

Umamimart Barware


---

Erik Ellestad

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...

Bernal Heights, SF, CA

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Umamimart has posted photographs and a video of artisans making Baron shakers in the Yukiwa factory:

 

http://umamimart.com/2014/04/visit-yukiwa-barware-factory-niigata/

 

 

It warmed my heart that in addition to their beautiful barware, Yukiwa manufactures precision ice cream scoops.  I am hoping umamimart may see fit to import the line.  Meanwhile I have another order from umamimart making its way to me across the Rockies, including a strainer from Yukiwa and a lovely yarai mixing glass:

 

http://shop.umamimart.com/collections/barware-mixing-glasses/products/mixing-glass-yarai-seamless

 

 

Rafa, did you ever replace your departed mixing glass?  Not to get too far off topic, I've been reading Charles H. Baker Jr.  Baker specifies silver as the material of choice for a shaker.  I have been using my silver Baron daily and I cannot recommend it highly enough.  I note however that Baker, like Sherlock Holmes, identifies as an amateur.

 

Though I believe Jerry Thomas was into silver also.

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I did indeed invest in a real pro shaker, and a few nights ago I shook up a drink in my Korikos in honor of our dear departed founder and OP. 

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DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

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I did indeed invest in a real pro shaker, and a few nights ago I shook up a drink in my Korikos in honor of our dear departed founder and OP. 

Nice honour!  How did you like the shaker compared to what you used to use?

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Honestly, the differences are slight, but for the better. The seal is excellent, but easy to break. The stainless steel looks great. I've used these at work before, but they're a marked improvement over my dear departed tins from Target.


DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

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I dunno. I've used every style of boston shaker out there (glass and all metal) and nothing seals as consistently as the korikos. I on the other hand find the seal hard to break.

Fun story, I was making a cocktail for a friend, put a non koriko large tin on the small one, gave it a securing slap, went to shake, and....

....no seal whatsoever. Half the drink went on me and the floor. That, ladies and gents, is why you shake w the rim of the large shaker facing you!

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A couple of months ago one of my colleagues was looking for help to buy a cobbler shaker.  One had already been purchased by the time I learned of her need.

 

Yesterday she asked again for my recommendation.  Since, she said, the first one broke.

 

I may not be a pro but the Barron is is daily use and gives much joy each and every time I shake with it...except, possibly, for the frostbite.  Even if, for some reason or other, the drink itself does not.  I don't even mind a little tarnish.

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So, I was in NY this weekend and popped in at Betony on 57th St, where my friend is a bartender. He has a wicked one-handed style of shaking with Korikos, which I'll have to practice, but also manages to open the shakers with a very gratifying POP, using what seemed to be only one hand. Anybody else pull this off, and if so, wanna teach me?  :biggrin:

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I could get used to that Yarai glass cobbler though....yum.

 

At the moment umamimart has the yarai glass cobbler on sale for $88 plus an additional 15% off on top of that.  I thought hard about the yarai glass cobbler, but I passed on it in favor of a bunch of other stuff.  I shouldn't talk about tea here.

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