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"Quay" by Peter Gilmore


teonzo
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Quay (http://www.quay.com.au/) is considered one of the best restaurants in Australia and in the world.

This book is even better. The layout and photographs are impressive. All dishes are interesting and personal. The recipes are detailed and well written. The dessert section is on par with the rest (the "guava snow egg" is stunning). Better if I stop here with the superlatives.

If you love the Alinea and the Noma books, then consider this a blind buy, it's on par with those 2 books. On amazon.co.uk it costs 20£, a total bargain.

Teo

Teo

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The thing is, this book is so expensive in Australia. I think I can get it at about $70 online, but most places sell it for $95 or so.

I know I'll be doing some cookbook shopping when I make a trip back to the US....

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  • 1 month later...

I really like Quay.

After eating there last year I couldn't wait to get the book and flick through very often. I love Peter's use of custards. A huge inspiration in my cooking.

As above, my only complaint is the silver writing that is hard to read on the small rice paper pages.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Just ordered a copy from Amazon.uk. Twentysomething bucks? No postage charge? Sold.

Yep, Quay was given to me as a gift but I bought 'Bentley' when Amazon UK had it on sale for £13, also well worth a look. With free shipping that's just under Aus$20, while the book sells in Sydney for Aus$90. I'm still working my way through 'Modernist Cuisine' so I've hardly opened 'Bentley', but from flicking through it it seems to be well worth the $20. Jump in before the free delivery to Australia expires!

The 8 texture chocolate cake in 'Quay' really impresses me, it's something I will definitely attempt at home. I was especially struck by the concept of using the heat of the sauce to deliberately melt an opening for the rest of the sauce - brilliant piece of edible drama! The only problem with trying it at home is that I will need to go to the restaurant to see what their version is like...

I'm just waiting for strawberry guavas to come into season so I can try the famous guava snow egg...

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I bought Bentley as well. And, too, Pier. And too many others.

I think in the book--or maybe it was some Gourmet Traveller article or something--Gilmore mentioned that he makes the snow egg year round with different fruits, so rather than waiting for guavas you could use something else. Pretty sure that wherever I read this mentioned at least some of the different fruits he uses throughout the year.

Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between

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  • 2 months later...

I have eaten in Quay and tried cooking some of the recipes from the book. The biggest issue I have (and you will have) is the garnishes. Unless you have some of those herbs and flowers growing at home, you will be extremely lucky to find parsley flowers, coriander flowers, etc. in your local market. I actually went through the trouble of growing my own nasturtium and a few other plants that he needs just so that I could make some of his recipes.

The book is beautiful and pulls no punches. It is worth attempting a dish, even if you can not complete it, just so you learn the secrets behind the restaurant.

I bought the "Noma" book by Redzepi on the same day. That book is useless by comparison. Most of the dishes are based on stuff that he forages for in Norway. Well, none of that grows in sunny Australia so about the only thing "Noma" is good for is plating ideas. The Quay book is prettier, showcases more techniques, and is more accessible.

There is no love more sincere than the love of food - George Bernard Shaw
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It is, it's pure unadulterated food porn, but bear in mind that if you cook from it, it's incredibly likely you won't be able to cook most of the dishes without foregoing all the exotic 'specially grown for Quay' garnishes and substituting them for something a little realistic.

James.

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