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Grits

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Grits are indeed good. Very versatile ingredient for any meal. From a buttery breakfast dish, savory casserole to a grilled cake at dinner.

I get mine here: http://www.loganturnpikemill.com/ Not only can I get them in the local store, but the actual mill is only an hour or so away in the mountains and we are up there enough to get them fresh.

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Grits ARE good. There is not just one "grit" they are a collective, so to speak.

Unless one is referring to A "GRITS". :laugh:

(GRITS = Girl Raised In The South)


Edited by andiesenji (log)

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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I have a parrot and he eats them by the grit.

There is a picture with grits on his beak on the bulletin board at Falls Mill.

Currently I have been buying them from Hoppin' John, though.


I like to bake nice things. And then I eat them. Then I can bake some more.

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andiesenji..

"There is not just one "grit" they are a collective"

so GRITS would be (GRITS = Girl-s Raised In The South)

:wink:

Have a good day, best Paully


Edited by Paul Bacino (log)

Its good to have Morels

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I've been getting mine from Anson Mills. They are NOT easy to cook, and yes I've tried the slow cooker method. Mainly inspired by John Thorne's chapter in Mouth Wide Open for the approach. If anyone knows a way to cook artisanal grits without spending 90-120 minutes stirring, please let me know, because I LOVE them.

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I've been getting mine from Anson Mills. They are NOT easy to cook, and yes I've tried the slow cooker method. Mainly inspired by John Thorne's chapter in Mouth Wide Open for the approach. If anyone knows a way to cook artisanal grits without spending 90-120 minutes stirring, please let me know, because I LOVE them.

I buy from Anson Mills and from Falls Mill, Southern Connoisseur and Lee Brothers.

I have also purchased grits from Purcell Mountain Farms.

My method is an old one I learned 60 years ago.

The night prior to cooking I pour cold water over the grits to cover with 1 inch water above the level of the grits. I use an All-Clad sauce pan, SS for soaking and cooking.

They will soak up most of the water - there is no need to drain them, just add more water, about 1/3 to 1/2 you would usually add, add the desired amount of salt, and put onto the burner, medium high heat.

Mine take about 30 to 45 minutes to cook to the point I like them, although if I am going to put them into a mold to slice and fry later, I cook them a bit longer.


Edited by andiesenji (log)

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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I have bought Anson Mills and they are delicious but I think Oakview Farms are as good and for some reason seem to cook a bit quicker.

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Grits are not easy to cook? This is news- am I using the wrong grits, perhaps? :blink:

I've been eating grits my whole life and they're even easier for me than making steel-cut oats. Pan plus water plus grits plus heat = breakfast in about 15 min or so. I like to cook mine so there's still enough moisture that they don't glop together when they're served in the bowl. Best with crumbled bacon and a fried egg :wub:


I'm here to learn

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Dr Spice,

If you are cooking grits in 15 minutes, you're making quick grits. We're discussing real stone ground grits which take much longer.

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Fifteen, twenty five, whatever :laugh: . I'm talking stone ground grits. I've just never found them difficult to make, or to take that long, although I admit that I probably like them less creamy than some.


I'm here to learn

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I get mine here: http://www.loganturnpikemill.com/ Not only can I get them in the local store, but the actual mill is only an hour or so away in the mountains and we are up there enough to get them fresh.

Even with these hours?

Store Hours:

Tues. - Sat. 10 to 5:00 p.m.

Sunday – The Lord’s Day (Closed)

Monday – Delivery Day (Closed)

:)

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Fifteen, twenty five, whatever :laugh: . I'm talking stone ground grits. I've just never found them difficult to make, or to take that long, although I admit that I probably like them less creamy than some.

Really? 15-25 minutes for stone-ground grits?

I mean, I like some chew. That's not a problem.

What am I doing wrong?

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I have yet to come across real stone-ground hominy grits that cook to perfection in twenty-five minutes.

I've been cooking grits for sixty+ years.


"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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And speaking of Anson Mills - this article about Glenn Roberts, the guiding light of Anson Mills - is an excellent read.

His take on the nuturing of heirloom grain (and other plant) species is an essay that explains why and how such enterprises are so important to our future.

I know that all of us have read bits and pieces of this information over the past few years but this article puts it into one concise and quite complete format.

We need many more people like this man.


"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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There are discussions of where to buy grits in several different threads. Sources people like include Hoppin' Johns, Oakview Farms and Anson Mills. I've got a new one: Geechie Boy Market & Mill in South Carolina. I haven't compared shipping costs, but a 2 lb bag of white or yellow grits is $5. I've now tried both, and I think I like the white grits better; yummy. Geechie Boy also sells cornmeal, but it's finely ground--more like corn flour in my mind. The grits take what I consider to be an average cooking time, somewhere between 45 min and an hour, depending upon your preference/amount of liquid. Shipping price goes down with purchase of three or more bags of grain.

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I do grits all the time for my dinners. BUT I cook them in whole milk and stir on low the entire day of prepping. So they sit on that back simmer burner for a good 6 hours getting stirred every once in a while.

Result = "wow these grits are so creamy"


Sleep, bike, cook, feed, repeat...

Chef Facebook HQ Menlo Park, CA

My eGullet Foodblog

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And speaking of Anson Mills - this article about Glenn Roberts, the guiding light of Anson Mills - is an excellent read.

His take on the nuturing of heirloom grain (and other plant) species is an essay that explains why and how such enterprises are so important to our future.

I know that all of us have read bits and pieces of this information over the past few years but this article puts it into one concise and quite complete format.

We need many more people like this man.

Wow. Thanks for this. Good stuff.

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I'm glad to see grits getting some respect! I used to roll my eyes when I lived in Pennsylvania and people would blanch at the thought of eating grits, but thought nothing of eating polenta or scrapple.

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What's the position on hominy re grits?

I like and use both.

I usually buy the white hominy grits from Barry farm and often grind it much finer in my Nutrimill.

I recently ordered white hominy grits (Angelina's) from Amazon but have only tried them cooked plain - they are very good. I will eventually experiment with grinding them finer to use as cornmeal in polenta or cornbread.

I have to use up some I already have on hand. I consume a lot of corn products.


"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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This may seem like a silly question to some of you guys, but grits aren't part of my heritage.

When you have grits with either dinner or lunch, what are they usually/traditionally served with?

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