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May10April

Kitchen Scale Recommendations, 2011 –

126 posts in this topic

I know there was a thread on this a few years ago, however it seems these scales are no longer made or newer better models are available.

As I've become more serious about my baking, I've decided to get a kitchen scale. I'm debating between the My Weigh KD-8000 http://www.amazon.com/My-Weigh-Digital-Weighing-Scale/dp/B001NE0FU2/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1297958394&sr=8-1 or the EatSmart Precision Pro Digital Scale. http://www.amazon.com/EatSmart-Precision-Digital-Kitchen-Scale/dp/B001N0D7GA/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=home-garden&qid=1297958443&sr=1-1 Originally I wanted the Taylor Salter High Capacity Scale because it looked cool, but I've noticed it received many mixed reviews. http://www.amazon.com/Taylor-Salter-Aquatronics-Capacity-Kitchen/dp/B004BIOMGU/ref=sr_1_24?s=home-garden&ie=UTF8&qid=1297958465&sr=1-24

Here are my requirments:

-Minimum capacity of 11 lbs

-Minimum resolution of 1 g

-Measure in Kg, lb, oz, g

-Tare feature

-Preferably have seamless buttons

I want to get a nice scale. I don't want to get a scale with minimum features only to find in two years that I do enough baking/cooking that requires me to have something more sophisticated.

Here are a few other questions:

1. How important is it to have a scale measure fluid ounces?

2. What about measuring lbs. oz (for example 6 lbs and 4.2 ounces)

3. Is it important to have a scale measure in bakers %? I'd like to learn how to do these and have a cookbook that shows them next to the measurements. I'm not sure if this is something most people can figure out on their own or it would be handy to have them on a scale. The MW KD-8000 does this.

The only problem with the MW-KD-8000 is it appears to be big and bulky and I don't have a lot of counter space so I'd probably keep it stored most of the time. The Eat Smart just seems to minimal. The Salter seems like an expensive scale for what it offers and somewhat of a risk.

Thanks for any help in helping me choose the right scale. I do not know why this is becoming a chore to purchase! I just want to make sure I choose the right one right off the bat.

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I have the MyWeigh KD-8000, and I really like it. I haven't used the baker's percentage feature much, but I wanted to have it available when I want to use it. I like the little disposable plastic shields that can be used to protect the keypad, and I taped one on with electrical tape (so as not to have to replace it frequently), and it's still going strong. I've had the scale about 1-2 years, now, and while I don't use it frequently, when I do use it, I use it for a bunch of things at once.

The scale isn't really all that bulky, in my opinion. It's not too tall, and it doesn't take up a square foot of space.

That said, I don't know the dimensions of the other two scales (as they're not listed), but my guess would be that the MyWeigh would not have a larger footprint, although it would be taller. And it's really lightweight.


Edited by thock (log)

Tracy

Lenexa, KS, USA

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Is the minimum capacity of 11 lbs carved in stone? Because I can really recommend (okay: I adore mine) the Jennings CJ-4000 scale, but it only weighs up to 4 kg, or about 8 lbs, but apart from that, it meets your criteria. It also has a great warantee (10 years, if I remember correctly).

'Fluid ounce' is misleading: it's a volume measurement, so you'd want a measuring cup/pitcher for that.


Michaela, aka "Mjx"
Manager, eG Forums
mscioscia@egstaff.org

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I understand that with fluid ounces you just use a measuring cup. I've seem some scales advertise that they also measure fl oz like the Taylor Salter one. It just made me wonder. I doubt I'd use that feature on a scale.

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The problem with fluid ounces is that 1 fl. oz. of water does not weigh the same as 1 fl. oz of oil. Most of those fluid ounce measurements would be for water-based substances (water, vinegar, etc.).

I don't find fluid ounce measurements particularly helpful.


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As far as I can tell, the fl oz settings just don't roll over to lbs. So 30 oz would show 30, not 1 lb 14 oz. They assume water.

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I have the My weigh I 5000 5000g=11 lbs. use it for baking ,etc but only work in metric. its much easier to scale things, especially water.It has count functions,but I never use em,

Bud

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Costco here in the Pacific Northwest has a Polder digital scale with a range of 1 gram to 11 pounds. It is very thin and has a ridiculously low price of $18.99. I saw it there this week.

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I love that Deal Extreme scale, I've got the same one. I can't believe how great it is for $10.


Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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I hate to be the wet blanket, but has anyone tested the accuracy and precision of these cheap scales claiming sub-gram resolution? I'm a bit skeptical that a product costing $10 can reliably measure milligram quantities.


 

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Ditto that, as well as the basic sanity check that the stuff I cook turns out well, even when very small amounts are called for. My scale only resolves in .1g increments, though, not the .01g mentioned above. As an undergrad we built wheatstone bridges using relatively cheap parts and were able to get very accurate strain gauge measurements: presumably on an industrial scale it can be done quite easily.


Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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My wife and I have been hunting around locally for a couple of weeks for batteries ("coin type") for our Salter scale - either stores don't have that particular one, or it's sold out. I'd say that using standard AA, AAA or similar batteries is a "must have" feature for a kitchen scale. I'm seriously tempted to spend US$40 to get that My Weigh scale (which uses AA batteries) rather than US$10 for the replacement coin batteries with shipping...

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My wife and I have been hunting around locally for a couple of weeks for batteries ("coin type") for our Salter scale - either stores don't have that particular one, or it's sold out. I'd say that using standard AA, AAA or similar batteries is a "must have" feature for a kitchen scale. I'm seriously tempted to spend US$40 to get that My Weigh scale (which uses AA batteries) rather than US$10 for the replacement coin batteries with shipping...

for 4 or 5 dollars you can get an AC adapter that plugs in to it.thats what I did on mine.no more batteries...

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Tom, if you're not set on local battery sourcing, you might try eBay. I've had good luck getting large lots (for a household) of coin batteries of different types for pretty cheap from there. They're typically coming from Hong Kong, so you have to deal with the shipping time (up to a month, in some cases), but I've been pretty happy with the batteries I've gotten.


Tracy

Lenexa, KS, USA

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All my scales work on these 3 Volt

Check to see if your scale uses this one.

The only scale that seems to use them up rapidly is my bathroom scale but it has a significant job to do. :laugh:


"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

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I'd go with the Taylor Salter Aquatronics High Capacity Kitchen Scale - apparently, it's not only a cool looking digital scale, but according to one 5 star review, "It worked great shredding cheese. " :laugh:

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My wife and I have been hunting around locally for a couple of weeks for batteries ("coin type") for our Salter scale - either stores don't have that particular one, or it's sold out. I'd say that using standard AA, AAA or similar batteries is a "must have" feature for a kitchen scale. I'm seriously tempted to spend US$40 to get that My Weigh scale (which uses AA batteries) rather than US$10 for the replacement coin batteries with shipping...

I have a Salter scale as well and I haven't had any problems finding the replacement coin batteries. Places like Best Buy. Target, Walmart etc all carry them here.

If the stores near you normally carry the battery, maybe you can have them order and hold some for you so that you don;t have to pay extra for the shipping...

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One other thing that I love about the CJ-4000 is that it has a power cord, so if the batteries go while I'm in the middle of something (my old OBH did this routinely, and devoured batteries, into the bargain), you just plug it in, and carry on. Whatever model you get, I really do recommend getting one that has this feature.


Michaela, aka "Mjx"
Manager, eG Forums
mscioscia@egstaff.org

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Hello, I am looking for a recommendation for a precision scale and wanted some opinions. First some ideas of what I am looking for:

-accurate

-at least 0.01 if not 0.001 gm measurements (the 0.001 would only be used for error measurement)

-relatively inexpensive (an almost universal desire for everything in life)

-available in Canada (or tariff free under NAFTA)

-tares

-calibrates

-won't break if something too heavy is put on it (not sure how much a concern this is)

I have come across web sites and have looked at the following and was interested if anyone has and dis/likes them:

Proscale Simplex Series

Jennings Mack 20

Jennings JS-XV series

Precision Digital Pocket Scale

Thank-you for any advice/info.

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My favorite scale is a MYWeigh I5000..does everything I need , Tare 11 lbs grams, oz, etc.I use AC adapter rather than keep the batteries charged.Has a 30 year guarantee...Got it from OLD WILL KNOTT scales..

Bud

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Here are a few other questions:

1. How important is it to have a scale measure fluid ounces?

2. What about measuring lbs. oz (for example 6 lbs and 4.2 ounces)

3. Is it important to have a scale measure in bakers %? I'd like to learn how to do these and have a cookbook that shows them next to the measurements. I'm not sure if this is something most people can figure out on their own or it would be handy to have them on a scale. The MW KD-8000 does this.

A scale can't measure fluid ounces, so forget about that. Most scales allow you to choose different units. I use mine metric 99% of the time. There are some kinds of things that I still think about in pounds ... like the weight of a whole chicken ... so I'll ocasionally switch units for that. But it's unimportant.

To my knowledge, there aren't any scales that use baker's percentages. You have to do the math yourself (super easy if you're working with metric units). I designed a baker's percentage user interface for MyWeigh a few years ago. They gave me a nice scale in exchange for my efforts, but it seems there wasn't enough demand for them to actually make the thing.

I'm sure all the Myweigh scales that people are recommending will do the job. They're a great value. I got one that goes to 0.1g. It's a nice convenience for things like leaveners and colloids, but it's much more cost effective to get a high capacity scale that reads to 1g, and then a second low capacity scale that reads to 0.1 or finer.

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I still stand behind my Taylor scale. It has all of the features you mentioned, except that it measures to 10 lbs, not 11. It comes with an AC plug, which is a nice feature to have if you use it regularly.

Taylor Scale


"Salt is born of the purest of parents: the sun and the sea." --Pythagoras.

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