Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Hot Coffee with a Straw?!?


Recommended Posts

I saw something today I'd never seen before. A student at Johnson and Wales brought back coffee and iced tea for several people in the bread classroom (including yours truly -- more on that visit later), along with straws for all the cold drinks. However, one of the iced tea drinkers was short a straw, and when we looked around to see why, one visitor was drinking the hot coffee through a straw stuck into the little hole in the cover.

I have never seen this before. Does it have some meaning of which I'm unaware?

Chris Amirault

eG Ethics Signatory

Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

Link to post
Share on other sites

I saw something today I'd never seen before. A student at Johnson and Wales brought back coffee and iced tea for several people in the bread classroom (including yours truly -- more on that visit later), along with straws for all the cold drinks. However, one of the iced tea drinkers was short a straw, and when we looked around to see why, one visitor was drinking the hot coffee through a straw stuck into the little hole in the cover.

I have never seen this before. Does it have some meaning of which I'm unaware?

I used to do this with Starbucks. I take my coffee black, which is always quite hot at SB, I guess for people who add a lot of milk/cream. Drinking it through a straw kept me from burning my tongue many times.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Here it's a health department thing, all drinks for employees/students in a commercial kitchen must drink from a closed container with a straw. Having the mouth touch the outside of a container like a coffee cup top or water bottle rim is not permitted.

OK, I'm intrigued. What, exactly is the rationale behind this? I cannot, for all the regulatory/quality/safety/biosafety/pseudo-science geek experience I've had in my career, for the life of me even begin to figure out why a straw is better than a bottle rim or an adult "sippy" cup lid.

'Splain, pleaze, Looooocy.

--Roberta--

"Let's slip out of these wet clothes, and into a dry Martini" - Robert Benchley

Pierogi's eG Foodblog

My *outside* blog, "A Pound Of Yeast"

Link to post
Share on other sites

It's supposed to minimize the chance that a person's hand would touch the spot where their mouth touched. With a water bottle, you have to unscrew a cap that may have germs on it because your mouth touched the rim of the bottle then the cap was replaced -over and over again. With a coffee cup, you have a cup with a lid with a hole in it, but, when it's close t being full you grab it near the top because that area is cooler than the main body of the cup. People might grab the cup under the rim, holding an arc under the lid. Or they might grab two opposite side of the rim with their fingertips, holding their palm above the lid. Either way, it's possible to touch an area where the lips rested, thus transferring bacteria from the mouth/chin to the hand or glove.

A straw limits the contact with the mouth to a small, easily identified area of contamination.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yup, the folks who use a straw for ice tea do it so they wont have to taste all that awful ice tea, same thing for all those milkshake drinkers in the world, at least by that logic.

Drink thru a straw. Does it skip your mouth? Really? It just skips the front teeth - you know, the ones that show coffee stains. And if you've paid to have your teeth bleached, you would care about these things.

"You dont know everything in the world! You just know how to read!" -an ah-hah! moment for 6-yr old Miss O.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 year later...

Looked at that site, and, WHAAAAAT?! They're messing with us.

I buy the reasons that have been suggested upthread, here – workplace regulations thing, the ouch-I've-trashed-the-outside-of-my-lips thing – but the reasons this website suggests on the home page are kind of implausible sounding: 'Spill stopper'?! They've got to be kidding. I'm the sort of person who can frequently be seen falling upstairs, and even I manage to get coffee from my cup to my mouth without dousing myself; on those occasions that I'm not coordinated enough to accomplish this, a straw isn't really going to help.

And, unless the coffee shoots straight down your throat, bypassing your mouth entirely, it's still going to come in contact with your teeth. Also, I've never found coffee to stain that persistently (tea is much worse), and the 'sugar eroding the tooth enamel' thing sounds kind of nuts, because I don't know anyone whose only source of sugar is their coffee (and again, even when using a straw, the coffee is going to swish about your mouth a bit).

Is this just the solution to a 'problem' they've invented themselves, or what?

Michaela, aka "Mjx"
Manager, eG Forums
mscioscia@egstaff.org

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...

I have been known to drink coffee with a straw, not only does it not stain my teeth, but I get to stir the coffee with it when I need to, much better than those little stir sticks that are way too flimsy, IMHO...

"I eat fat back, because bacon is too lean"

-overheard from a 105 year old man

"The only time to eat diet food is while waiting for the steak to cook" - Julia Child

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Similar Content

    • By liuzhou
      China's favorite urinating “tea pet” is actually a thermometer.
    • By Johnhouse
      Hello everyone!
       
      I have been working in food and beverage industry for almost 10 years in different countries. I am looking forward to learn new things on this forum to expand my food and beverage knowledge as well as sharing my experiences that I gained in my journey!
       
      Have a good day! ☺️ 
    • By MattJohnson
      I've been a big coffee fan for years, but lately, I've been drinking more tea.
      Where do you get your tea? Do you have an importer you like? An online store you frequent. I've been buying tea from Rishi at stores in the Milwaukee area (they are located in the area too) and have been very happy.
      One of my favorites so far is the Earl Green. Very tasty.
      .... sorry if there is a thread like this already, I did a quick search but didn't see anything....
    • By liuzhou
      This arose from this topic, where initially @Anna N asked about tea not being served at the celebratory meal I attended. I answered that it is uncommon for tea to be served with meals (with one major exception). I was then asked for further elucidation by @Smithy. I did start replying on the topic but the answer got longer than I anticipated and was getting away from the originally intended topic about one specific meal. So here were are..
       
      I'd say there are four components to tea drinking in China.

      a) When you arrive at a restaurant, you are often given a pot of tea which people will sip while contemplating the menu and waiting for other  guests to arrive. Dining out is very much a group activity, in the main. When everyone is there and the food dishes start to arrive the tea is nearly always forgotten about. The tea served like this will often be a fairly cheap, common brand - usually green.
       
      You also may be given a cup of tea in a shop if your purchase is a complicated one. I recently bought a new lap top and the shop assistant handed me tea to sip as she took down the details of my requirements. Also, I recently had my eyes re-tested in order to get new spectacles. Again, a cup of tea was provided. Visit someone in an office or have a formal meeting and tea or water will be provided.
       
      b) You see people walking about with large flasks (not necessarily vacuum flasks) of tea which they sip during the day to rehydrate themselves. Taxi drivers, bus drivers, shop keepers etc all have their tea flask.  Of course, the tea goes cold. I have a vacuum flask, but seldom use it - not a big tea fan. There are shops just dedicated to selling the drinks flasks.
       
      c) There has been a recent fashion for milk tea and bubble tea here, two trends imported from Hong Kong and Taiwan respectively. It is sold from kiosks and mainly attracts younger customers. McDonald's and KFC both do milk and bubble teas.
       

      Bubble and Milk Tea Stall
       

      And Another
       

      And another - there are hundreds of them around!
       

      McDonald's Ice Cream and Drinks Kiosk.


      McDonald's Milk Tea Ad
       
      d) There are very formal tea tastings and tea ceremonies, similar in many ways to western wine tastings. These usually take place in tea houses where you can sample teas and purchase the tea for home use. These places can be expensive and some rare teas attract staggering prices. The places doing this pride themselves on preparing the tea perfectly and have their special rituals. I've been a few times, usually with friends, but it's not really my thing. Below is one of the oldest serious tea houses in the city. As you can see, they don't go out of their way to attract custom. Their name implies they are an educational service as much as anything else. Very expensive!
       

      Tea House

      Supermarkets and corner shops carry very little tea. This is the entire tea shelving in my local supermarket. Mostly locally grown green tea.
       

       

      Local Guangxi Tea
       
      The most expensive in the supermarket was this Pu-er Tea (普洱茶 pǔ ěr chá) from Yunnan province. It works out at ¥0.32per gram as opposed to ¥0.08 for the local stuff. However, in the tea houses, prices can go much, much higher!
       

       
       
    • By catdaddy
      Mrs catdaddy has been good this year and I'm considering buying a Rancilio Silvia as a Christmas present. I know this machine gets a lot of love here, especially when outfitted with a PID. After reading many posts I'm just wondering if there is anything new (since 2013 say) I should know about  the Rancilio or other great machine on the market?
       
      Also any tips about use and/or essential other tools.....like a good knock box. We've got a great grinder already.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...