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The Water Bottle Topic


Fat Guy
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I'm with you, Mark. If I can taste it, I don't trust it. I can generally taste plasticky tastes in water from plastic bottles, but I haven't yet tasted a metallic taste from my Klean Kanteens or my other stainless bottles.

Tracy

Lenexa, KS, USA

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Any scientific types out there that can set us straight on the plastic vs. stainless steel arguments?

As far as the plastic goes, we tried as best we could in this thread. Conclusion: inconclusive. One thing to keep in mind--if you're avoiding water bottles because they may contain BPA, you might want to avoid most canned products too, as the cans are lined with at BPA-derived resin.

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"... if water sits overly long, it becomes the perfect environment for bacteria, mold, or algae."

Not if it's just water - nothing for bacteria or molds to metabolize, and not enough minerals(fixed nitrogen - nitrates, ammonia, protein; phosphorus - usually phosphates; or potassium salts) to sustain the growth of algae. A simple rinse with clean water every time you refill it will reduce any bacteria that have accumulated from contamination by a couple of orders of magnitude. If you are using it for juices, or coffee, or other things that might sustain bacterial growth or leave behind minerals, an occasional cleaning with soap (probably a high pH - Dawn is reportedly ~9 - YMMV - will inactivate some acid loving bacteria; will also remove schmutz which could supply nutrients that may have accumulated) followed by a vinegar rinse (dissolves minerals, low pH will kill/inactivate more bacteria) should suffice.

There's a lot of stuff that could be in there -

"A recent experiment that used 16S RNA probes to survey the diversity of bacteria in dental plaque revealed that only one percent of the total species found have ever been cultivated." http://www.textbookofbacteriology.net/normalflora.html

but you've adapted to your bacteria, so they are unlikely to cause problems. But others will have a different oral ecosystem; don't share your bottle except with your wife or girlfriend.

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I don't like having to unscrew caps on water bottles, I pretty much only use them when hiking or biking and dropped one too many caps on the ground which I then had to wash with the water I brought :laugh: The twist half around and drink from nipples on some Sigg bottles are ok, but the cap that goes over always breaks off and after a while the nipple gets all beat up, so my sigg are retired.

I recently bought a set of plastic bottles at CostCo, made by contigo. You press a button on the back and the drinking spout in front opens, release and it's closed again, completely spill proof (I just tried). The top also has little ring handle that has a carbine in it, so you can hang it from your belt loop or backpack. A great idea, as I tend to at least have to carry my 3 year old's bottle (and mine) and it keeps my hands free for the camera. No plastic taste what so ever, which is nice too. I've thrown out plenty water bottles for bike bottle holders for that plastic taste reason. I'd rather drink from a creek then. (though I must warn you, I had the unpleasant experience of doing just that and - after hiking up a bit further - finding a nice cow patty in the water of the same creek :laugh:

Survived just fine though, apparently that cow in Austria was healthy.

The only downside with these bottles - if you will - is that they are rather large, I'd guess they can hold at least half a liter. They looked smaller in the package. And for hikes I just fill them with what I think is appropriate for each kid, not to the top.

Other than for hiking I prefer mineral water and am guilty of lots of half liter bottles with my germs on them in the landfill, but I have not found a way around that. I'm considering one of those soda makers that have shown up recently, they seem to work well.

Edited by OliverB (log)

"And don't forget music - music in the kitchen is an essential ingredient!"

- Thomas Keller

Diablo Kitchen, my food blog

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I've got piles of water bottles and hydration bladders that I use for hiking and climbing. Not a single metal sigg-type bottle among them, because the small mouth makes these too hard to clean, and the opacity makes it imposible to see if they're full or empty, clean or septic.

I just think the Nalgene bottles are superior in every way. I personally don't find any of the evidence against BPA (in a bottle used for cold water) to be compelling, so I prefer my old lexan bottles. They're completely indestrucible, and this is worth a lot to me. If BPA worries you (which might make sense if you want to carry hot drinks or if you're pregnant) the newer, non-polycarbonate ones are fine. Just don't drop them onto rocks when they're full.

I have two of the polycarbonate lexans that have been used steadily since the mid 1980s. One of them recently needed a new lid. Otherwise they're scarred but good as new, and have never retained flavors of any kind.

Notes from the underbelly

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  • 2 years later...

More than a year ago, I got Toots a bottle from these folks: http://www.kleankanteen.com/products/klean-kanteens.php I got tired of her using and reusing those plastic bottles - yecch!

There are several sizes, a variety of colors, a few different tops to choose from, insulated and non-insulated.

She's been very happy with her bottle, carries it with her every day - uses it in the car, it fits nicely into her purses, and into that pack thing some people wear around their waist, takes it to the theater, hiking, camping. The insulated one allows for hot and cold contents, though she uses hers mainly for water.

Edited by Shel_B (log)

 ... Shel


 

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