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Making Cilantro Pesto


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So I had a batch of cilantro and wanted to make pesto out of it

1 Bunch of cilantro tops and stems-- I found that the stems will add just a touch of bitterness ( ? )

2 cloves garlic

2 green onions

1/4 C Parm cheese

1/4 C Pignoli

2 limes juiced

S and P

I think if i would have used cashews ..it may have offset the bitterness of the stems?

Probably going to marinade some chicken thighs for some stuffed Green chili's with rice and cheese .

What would you do?

Its good to have Morels

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The bitterness may have been caused by the stems, but it may also be due to the pine nuts, if they came from pine species that are not normally used for human consumption. This article discusses a condition called 'pine mouth', which does not, however, affect all those who eat the rougue nuts, but they might still make the pesto taste bitter/metallic while it's being eaten: Metallic tasting pine nuts are from illegitimate Chinese sources.

Or, as you suggest, you just might need a sweeter nut to offset the cilantro stems.

Michaela, aka "Mjx"
Manager, eG Forums
mscioscia@egstaff.org

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My usual cilantro pesto recipe calls for roasted pumpkin seeds (pepitas) in place of the pine nuts. I'll be interested to see what others suggest for uses, since I usually just end up putting it on pasta.

--Roberta--

"Let's slip out of these wet clothes, and into a dry Martini" - Robert Benchley

Pierogi's eG Foodblog

My *outside* blog, "A Pound Of Yeast"

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You may want to 86 the onions, pick only the LEAVES of the cilantro, and use grated cotija cheese. I am not at all sure about the lime juice, however. I would strip it down to the basics: cilantro (the basil), garlic (ditto), lightly toasted pepitas, and a Spanish olive oil ... or pumpkinseed or avocado oil. Finish it off with finely grated queso cotija (the parm). This is how I make it and have never had problems with bitterness.

Curious. I never use citrus in either my basil or cilantro pesto, so I am not sure what the limes are doing there ... lovely as they are, they might be causing a reaction with the parm that causes the bitterness.

Quizzically,

Theabroma

Sharon Peters aka "theabroma"

The lunatics have overtaken the asylum

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My most recent use of the lovely masses of inexpensive cilantro was a "chutney" using lots of cilantro, rich coconut milk, a bit of ginger, enough serrano peppers to make it quite hot, and onion. It has been used at the end of roasting potatoes, on top of shrimp set to broil, and just spooned over things like a salsa. The pesto made by the original poster with more oil and cheese I see with chicken and also in a potato or winter squash dish.

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Emily, that was my understanding too. I think I've heard it from other sources, though for the life of me I couldn't tell you who....

But supposedly, at least in Asian cuisines, the stems *AND* the roots of cilantro are prized, and used in broths and stir fries. I know when I've purchased cilantro from Asian vendors at the Farmers' Market, they come with roots attached.

I'm not so picky about cilantro stems any longer, and I don't notice any particular overwhelming bitterness. But then I do like bitter flavors as a rule...

--Roberta--

"Let's slip out of these wet clothes, and into a dry Martini" - Robert Benchley

Pierogi's eG Foodblog

My *outside* blog, "A Pound Of Yeast"

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Personally I do not find coriander stems bitter. I think that typically recipes just call for the leaves because the coriander stems have a crunchier texture that some people may not want. However, I love the crunch they add to dishes when added at the last minute, and I also sometimes add them earlier on in the cooking if I want all of their flavour, but with a softer texture. Certainly in chutneys and whizzed up sauces I always use them along with the leaves - they have a fantastic flavour and you don't want to waste them!

ETA: Oh, and the roots are fantastic added near the beginning of a dish with plenty of liquid!

Edited by Jenni (log)
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I do mine with the leaves and stems, garlic, walnuts, Parmigiano Reggiano, extra virgin olive oil, salt, and lemon juice, and don't experience any bitterness. The added citrus makes a world of difference - it really picks it up.

There's nothing better than a good friend, except a good friend with CHOCOLATE.
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I like the pumpkin seed idea!! Thanks

So what I did was get some Cannellini Beans which I washed and dressed with the cilantro pesto, added lime marinated cherry tomatoes, sweet pickled jalapenos, I didn't have pumpkin seed but added sunflower seeds a bit Malbar Pepper and shreaded Parm. Made a interesting side.

Now i think the pesto should last for a couple weeks...

Cheers

Its good to have Morels

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