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Darienne
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Mexico Cooks

The author occasionally posts here under the name Esperanza. This is pretty much the gold standard for Mexican food related blogs for m.

Street Gourmet LA tends to be more oriented to Los Angeles, northern Baja with the occasional foray into interior Mexico. The author is a musician who is always in search of good eats. Usually a pretty interesting read.

Not strictly Mexican, but with some good and related stuff non-the less, the Rancho Gordoblog is loads of fun and has good info

And finally the Top 10 Mexican Food blogs and bloggers . Not entirely sure who made up this list, I found it just by Googling and it looks pretty solid.

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I subscribe via RSS feed to

Mexconnect.com

Under "Feeds" there is a list and I get the Cuisine feed via Google.

Most posts and many recipes are by Karen Hursh Graber but there are some from others.

The explanations of how to use various ingredients and also some help with sourcing is more complete than I have found on other sites.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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Darienne, not sure you really need to do the RSS thing with MexConnect. It's one of the very best all-around resources for Mexico on the web. Just go to the MexConnect web site (MexConnect.com) and you can access all their culinary information including the archieves. It used to be a subscription site but a year to 18 months ago it re-invented itself and is no longer a fee for service site. I've been on MexConnect since 2002 or 2003 and have gotten a lot of good information on assorted topics.

The Forums on MexConnect are great, some of them are a little better than others, but they're all fairly active. There is a Cooking forum and it's more active than the Mexico board here on eGullet. You may have to register to post, buy you can read for free.

Karen Hursh Graber lives in Cuernavaca and is their culinary editor; the majority of articles are written by her. I've seen articles published by her in some of the U.S. food trade magazines. I do think, however, that she writes for the ex-pat or American palate. I've tried several of her recipes and while they're "okay", they've not wow'ed me and I think the flavor profiles are a little bland. The information she includes in her articles is usually accurate and pretty good, I think she may have dumbed down the recipes a bit for non-Mexican tastes. Or, perhaps, I've just tried the wrong recipes :laugh: who knows.

In any event I can heartily give Andiesenji's recommendation of MexConnect a couple of big thumbs up. Check out their web site - http://www.mexconnect.com/ - and give it a whirl

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Took a quick look at MexConnect and it looks good too. Now may be the time when I figure out how to get RSS feed. I see there is an explanation of how to do it.

You can also get it so it shows up in your bookmarks if you select your browser for the feed.

I particularly like that I can search by ingredient for recipes, which is very helpful when I can't think of something to prepare and I have certain ingredients on hand and want to use them up.

Without this I would never have discovered the fettucine with ancho sauce, which is simply wonderful. I clicked on pastas and this popped up.

Edited by andiesenji (log)

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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Thanks Andie and Calypso for the information. I have bookmarked the website in my 'Mexican Cooking' folder.

I began the process to register for RSS feed and gave up on page three or so of the requirements. I just don't understand the directions after a while and seeing as I have no 16 year lads in my life, I'll just give up and do it in a more manual fashion. There are a number of other blogs which I follow this way by bookmark.

Thanks again.

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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Steve at Rancho Gordo has talked about starting a Mexican 'charla' forum in connection with RanchoGordo.com. Maybe we should all insist!

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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Googled 'charla'. Talk, speech, chat. Could you give me a little more info about this, Jaymes, please?

Don't think there is, as of yet, any more to give any info about. It's just something Steve has spoken of doing in connection with his Rancho Gordo site.

And something I wish he would do!

Perhaps if we all ask? Politely?

Por favor, Esteban?

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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