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New Ruhlman/Polcyn Charcuterie Book: "Salumi"


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Reports are that Michael Ruhlman and Brian Polcyn have a second charcuterie book on the way.

Their first book was a transforming one for many Society members, including yours truly. We have two massive topics devoted to discussions about the book, the first one here (with the index Chris Hennes built for it here) and the second one here.

Amazon doesn't list the book on its Ruhlman page yet. What have people heard?

ETA: "Salumi" product page.

Chris Amirault

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Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

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Reports are that Michael Ruhlman and Brian Polcyn have a second charcuterie book on the way.

Their first book was a transforming one for many Society members, including yours truly. We have two massive topics devoted to discussions about the book, the first one here (with the index Chris Hennes built for it here) and the second one here.

Amazon doesn't list the book on its Ruhlman page yet. What have people heard?

I read about the new book on Ruhlman's blog - he was doing some "previews" of sorts, talking about his trip to Italy doing research for the book, some of the things he learned, etc. I think it is supposed to be out in March, but I am not sure about that.

I've got one body and one life, I'm going to take care of them.

I'm blogging as the Fabulous Food Fanatic here.

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  • 1 year later...

OK, I just got my copy of Salumi today, and it is fantastic. I really can't overstate how much I've been looking forward to this book, and it's exactly what I was looking for: an in-depth, up-to-date volume covering dry-curing in superb detail.

Glad to hear it...I ordered it and am eagerly awaiting delivery.

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I got my copy of Salumi by Ruhlman and Polycn Friday. I'm been reading and planning since... Thing like if I find a large lump of marble can I turn a cask out of it. With the exception of a few questions - how much airflow does one's drying box need? - it's very well done.

I guess I need to go kill or trap a feral hog next week... There's so much there to try.

Kevin

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  • 1 month later...

How good would this book be for a beginner? Thanks

For a beginner, I recommend the Marianski books, Home Production of Quality Meats and Sausages, The Art of Fermented Sausages and Meat Smoking and Smokehouse design.

~Martin

~Martin :)

I just don't want to look back and think "I could have eaten that."

Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it!

 

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It seems to me that the theoretical overlap is larger than the actual: while both books contain recipes for lardo, coppa, pancetta, guanciale, and salami, the actual recipes are different, and the new volume is much more detailed about the overall process and options for dry-curing. It also contains some updated advice regarding things like mold growth, and better food-safety information. There are also a lot more dry-cured recipes in the new book, since it's about as long as the original but doesn't contain any fresh sausages, confits, terrines, etc. That said, I think that if you don't really need the additional detail, are already comfortable with the food safety aspects, and don't need or care about specific recipes, then the new volume doesn't add anything.

Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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They will be in Chicago on Friday for a demonstration set up by the Butcher and the Larder...looking forward to Ruhlman and Polycn being here!

"A cloud o' dust! Could be most anything. Even a whirling dervish.

That, gentlemen, is the whirlingest dervish of them all." - The Professionals by Richard Brooks

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