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Chris Amirault

Pressure Cookers: 2011 and beyond

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You wouldn't want to pressure cook a ragu Bolognese; although it's time consuming to make, that's because of the volume of broth being reduced (so, you'd have the lid off, making your pressure cooker just a big pot).

You can absolutely pressure cook bolognese... there is no need to reduce broth, you just add less. Here's my pressure cooker ragu Bolognese:

http://www.hippressurecooking.com/2010/10/traditional-bolognese-sauce-in-half.html

As you can see the time form the original Bolognese is only cut in HALF - because the reduction of each ingredient still needs to be made and only the boiling part is done under pressure. Since things don't bubble and rub together in the cooker, and to prevent scorching, I stop pressure cooking it mid-way, stir, and add a little extra liquid.

Ciao,

L


hip pressure cooking - making pressure cooking hip, one recipe at a time!

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I've been using the hawkins models stainless stell PCs for years now, I've never tried anything else. It seems like the favorites mentioned in this thread are so much more expensive. I'm wondering if anyone else out there can compare the hawkins to some of the fancier ones... I'm just wondering what I'm missing out on if anything, as I PC daily and any improvement is always welcome.

Thanks & Happy New Years!


www.eatthesun.com

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Thanks to MC@H I bought a smaller pressure cooker then the giant one my wife uses to can.

Kuhn Rikon Duromatic 3-3/4-Quart Pressure Saucepan

What I'm curious about if anyone knows is where I should have the popup thingy at when cooking with MC@H who normally wants 1 bar

I've read from the manual with the cooker that the 2nd red line is .8 bars... and I've read elsewhere that it's 1 bar when at the 2nd line....

I'm thinking it's supposed to be a little past to be at 1 bar, the unit goes up to 1.2 bars without being unhappy.

This appears to be the exact pressure cooker MC cut in half for their cookbook so I'm guessing someone else has it too.


Edited by Raamo (log)

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Where is the information about 1.2 bar from? I'm not sure that is the model used in the books but it is certainly a Kuhn-Rikon.

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The instruction book says the maximum pressure is 1.2 bars.

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I own a couple of Kuhn-Rikon Duromatic Hotel PCs. As far as I know the second red line is 0.8 bar and pressure is released when 1.2 bar is achieved. This means that if you look for a point somewhere between the second red line and the moment steam is released you will have around 1 bar, as asked in MC recipes.

The issue of European Pressure Cookers having 0.8 bar as the high pressure setting, as opposed to US Pressure Cookers, was commented earlier in the thread by Laura from hippressurecooking: see http://egullet.org/p1850356

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dont understand the above: 1 bar is about 1 atmosphere of pressure. at sea level. obtainable with normal water at any temp.

0.8 bar is sub-atmospheric pressure, obtainable in a partial vacuum.

???

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The bars are in addition to the atmospheric pressure. Meaning the pressure inside the PC would be 1.8 ATA (atmospheres absolute) at sea level when the second red bar is hit, if I understand correctly.

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I own a couple of Kuhn-Rikon Duromatic Hotel PCs. As far as I know the second red line is 0.8 bar and pressure is released when 1.2 bar is achieved. This means that if you look for a point somewhere between the second red line and the moment steam is released you will have around 1 bar, as asked in MC recipes.

The issue of European Pressure Cookers having 0.8 bar as the high pressure setting, as opposed to US Pressure Cookers, was commented earlier in the thread by Laura from hippressurecooking: see http://egullet.org/p1850356

Thanks this makes sense, so the 2nd red bar is .8 / 13 psi... I can go over it a little bit to get to 15 psi / 1 bar, too much and I'll hit 1.2 and it'll not be happy :)

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you're going to need to reduce about a litre of stock, and you can't do that with a lid on.

If you add less broth, you get less flavour; concentration of broth, rather than its final volume is key.

Agreed. Though reducing a litre of stock won't have the same effect; you're sending the aromatics into the room.

If one wants to go really old school, one makes double or triple stocks, rather than demi-glaces. This is not entirely forgotten; The Flavor Bible quotes Dan Barber of Blue Hill at Stone Barns as making a triple pork stock. I've made triple stocks for gumbo; I imagine one would be spectacular for Bolognese.

What I don't know is whether using a pressure cooker to make stocks negates any advantage to making a triple stock. It would certainly save time.


Per la strada incontro un passero che disse "Fratello cane, perche sei cosi triste?"

Ripose il cane: "Ho fame e non ho nulla da mangiare."

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I see no reason why you cant make a triple stock in a PC, if by triple stock you mean each subsequent stock uses the liquid from its predecessor .

i would think that would be the most efficient way!

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The instruction book says the maximum pressure is 1.2 bars.

Is that the same booklet that contains recipes that comes with the unit, or does that unit have a separate instruction book?

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You can make a double-strength stock in the pressure cooker by just covering the ingredients with water. Then, you could strain it and reduce it by half by boiling without the lid and have quadruple strength stock!

Don't knock pressure cooker ragu unless you've tried it. The flavor is amazing and - personally - I think it's better.

Before, I could not have a good ragu for lunch unless I started cooking at 9am. Now, I can saunter in the kitchen around 11 and have a stunning sauce for tagliatelle or lasagna for lunch!

There are faster ways to make pressure cooker ragu - but I'm referring to the Bolognese which requires each ingredient is carefully browned and reduced as it's added to the pot.

Ciao,

L


hip pressure cooking - making pressure cooking hip, one recipe at a time!

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dont understand the above: 1 bar is about 1 atmosphere of pressure. at sea level. obtainable with normal water at any temp.

0.8 bar is sub-atmospheric pressure, obtainable in a partial vacuum.

???

Isn't the convention to talk about the additional pressure beyond normal. 1 bar + whatever additional pressure is provided by the pressure cooker?

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The pressure in the pressure cooker is measured above atmospheric pressure. So, if you are at higher altitude - say 2,000 feet and above which is a lower atmospheric pressure than sea level- the pressure cooker's pressure is also affected.

For cooking, the pressure differential between altitudes it is just a matter of adding a minute or two, but for canning and sterilization more rigorous tracking of pressure and time are necessary.

Ciao,

L


hip pressure cooking - making pressure cooking hip, one recipe at a time!

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The instruction book says the maximum pressure is 1.2 bars.

Is that the same booklet that contains recipes that comes with the unit, or does that unit have a separate instruction book?

Separate instruction book, English is the 3rd Language, after German and French but before about 3 more. So I suspect it's the european model and thus the .8 bar high settings. I got it from amazon, not sure who locally even would sell these units.

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My library is getting this book and Im on the reserve list. it will be interesting to see. In the past i used to get their books, but for many years I rely on my local lib.

I am a fan of their two shows, and have most of them as video files. they are sometimes very worthwhile

as far as I can recall, I've never seen them use a PC on either of these shows.


Edited by rotuts (log)

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My library is getting this book and Im on the reserve list. it will be interesting to see. In the past i used to get their books, but for many years I rely on my local lib.

I am a fan of their two shows, and have most of them as video files. they are sometimes very worthwhile

as far as I can recall, I've never seen them use a PC on either of these shows.

I have on DVD every ATK episode but the 1st season and they never use a pressure cooker. The latest season I only have the book and there are no pressure cooker recipes in it.

This is the 1st I've heard of this book, but it won't be the last. The one down side to this company they try really hard to sell their books :)

I may get this book for that exact reason, they also do a good job of using science so it might be the most modernist friendly ATK book yet.

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they have a 'Science' book. its decent and I of course get it from the lib. recommended it to my sister and it suits her.

they are specialists at Rx Churn. will report back on Test Kitchen PC.

on further reflection, maybe they have not done PC on their shows for fear of some sort of liability. What else might it be? the units are cheap. they have made recommendations on models in their books: they recommend the Fagor in the 10 year Test Kitchen TV show cookbook. But PC does not appear in the index.

then they have this:

http://www.americastestkitchen.com/equipment-reviews/detail.php?docid=41600&incode=M**ASCA00

season 13 Short Ribs episode 1321 which has not yet been shown in my area.


Edited by rotuts (log)

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they have a 'Science' book. its decent and I of course get it from the lib. recommended it to my sister and it suits her.

they are specialists at Rx Churn. will report back on Test Kitchen PC.

on further reflection, maybe they have not done PC on their shows for fear of some sort of liability. What else might it be? the units are cheap. they have made recommendations on models in their books: they recommend the Fagor in the 10 year Test Kitchen TV show cookbook. But PC does not appear in the index.

then they have this:

http://www.americast...ncode=M**ASCA00

season 13 Short Ribs episode 1321 which has not yet been shown in my area.

I have the season 13 book, I'll have to look up this recipe when I'm home and report back on if it uses a PC.

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they seem to add each additional year of the Test Kitchen TV series to their "Omnibus";

http://www.amazon.com/Complete-Americas-Kitchen-Cookbook-2001-2013/dp/1936493322/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1358348765&sr=1-1&keywords=america%27s+test+kitchen+cookbook

I have the one that goes through 2010. no way im buying one of these every year!

Insert Salty Language Here. CK love his bucks!

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on further reflection, maybe they have not done PC on their shows for fear of some sort of liability. What else might it be? the units are cheap. they have made recommendations on models in their books: they recommend the Fagor in the 10 year Test Kitchen TV show cookbook. But PC does not appear in the index.

My guess would be that ATK hasn't featured pressure cookers on their shows simply because the producers, until recently, didn't think their target audience would be especially interested. Most Americans don't have pressure cookers, and many who have them don't use them. The popularity of "Modernist Cuisine," among other recent food/cooking trends, may have signaled to the ATK people that even though there are a number of good, reasonably-priced pressure-cooker cookbooks on the market, there was still room for one that would appeal particularly to those who like the ATK approach. The review of pressure cookers in ATK's sister enterprise, Cooks Illustrated, was probably timed to coordinate with the book's publication date.

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do you know what issue off CI that was in? Id like to take a look at my library.

thanks

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