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Appropriate Glass for appropriate Wine


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Wine is like organic element. It can speak for itself and can feel. Wine could not have been studied thoroughly, but recently I have found out a lot of very interesting information. Is not it interesting that in the middle of the last century was discovered that the form of the glass greatly influences on the wine Organoleptic indices. I have tried it myself and believe me for each time the wine tasted variously.

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I thought the only differences were general, for example, a narrow flute for holding champagne bubble longer, or a balloon glass for brandies and such. But I've never had the impression that it was really that nuanced an issue, particularly given that every individual has a slightly different array of taste buds and olfactory receptors.

Michaela, aka "Mjx"
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mscioscia@egstaff.org

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I think I have more of an issue with your theory that 'Wine is like organic element. It can speak for itself and can feel.'

But I think that the 'Glass affects the taste of the wine' theory almost as unlikely.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I don't agree either, really. Now I have to admit a certain fondness for certain glasses for some reason. But not that it has anything to do with the wine itself.

"I eat fat back, because bacon is too lean"

-overheard from a 105 year old man

"The only time to eat diet food is while waiting for the steak to cook" - Julia Child

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Ok, I'll be stupid and ask a question - please bear in mind that I don't drink and this is why I know nothing! The rest of my family has a passion for home brewing and enjoying fine drinks though, so I have picked up an interest in the subject.

What about with other alcohols? Different kinds of glass are used for different drinks, so is there a reason for that? Is it not possible that the width of the glass, which would change how much of the drink is exposed to the air, could change the taste of the drink? Isn't there something about glasses for port where you can sip the port from the bottom...?

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Jenni--with respect to other alcoholic drinks (and presumably nonalcoholic ones too), the functional role of the glass seems to be primarily to control how the aromas from the beverage are captured. And when it comes to beer, for all the fuss that is sometimes made over glassware selection, the usual practice of filling the glass to the top essentially negates any hypothetical differences between glasses. Think about it this way: aromas evaporate from the surface of the beer. If you fill the beer to the brim, the space between the top of the beer and the drinker's face is independent of the glass because there's no actual glass there! I think beer drinkers would find many of their beers have more intense aromas when served in a glass (not completely full please!) that helps to capture these aromas. Wine-type glasses are good for this, but even a half-full pint/tumbler glass probably gets you most of the way there.

I bet that you could try this with nonalcoholic beverages too--serve a fruit juice out of a half-full wine glass and a full-to-the-brim tumbler, and see if one has a more intense aroma. Who knows, maybe it's all in my head!

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I love the Riedel Ouverture glasses for a good all-purpose set to have at home and use for everything. A nice glass makes wine more enjoyable to me, but the business of having a glass for each specific type of wine can get to be a bit much for me.

"An appetite for destruction, but I scrape the plate."

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I'd say that the thickness of the rim of the glass has a far greater effect on my enjoyment of the wine than does the shape of the bowl. I love my Reidel glasses, but because of what they are made of not because I have 8 different types for different grapes. In fact, two types would do me forever, a flute for fizz and a nice generous large one for everything else.

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I'd say that the thickness of the rim of the glass has a far greater effect on my enjoyment of the wine than does the shape of the bowl. I love my Reidel glasses, but because of what they are made of not because I have 8 different types for different grapes. In fact, two types would do me forever, a flute for fizz and a nice generous large one for everything else.

This works for me.. but I like a balance feel.. preferable lighter weight.

Its good to have Morels

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It depends on the occasion for me - a simple wine in a enamel cup or a Picardie-type tumbler by the campfire can be fine. I do usually prefer a finer rim, and find a heavy rim distracting. I don't think a different glass for every style makes sense, but that's just not my thing.

Edited by violetfox (log)

"Life itself is the proper binge" Julia Child

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