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VacMaster VP210 vs. VacMaster VP112


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Those of you who have Vacmaster chamber sealers, especially those of you who have had them for a while, are you still happy with them? We've just about had it with our FoodSaver and its inability to seal liquids!

MelissaH

MelissaH

Oswego, NY

Chemist, writer, hired gun

Say this five times fast: "A big blue bucket of blue blueberries."

foodblog1 | kitchen reno | foodblog2

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Those of you who have Vacmaster chamber sealers, especially those of you who have had them for a while, are you still happy with them? We've just about had it with our FoodSaver and its inability to seal liquids!

MelissaH

Melissa, I have had my VP112 for 6 months or so and use it at least once a day for various uses. It is very solid and easy to use. I absolutely love it. If I had to do it over again I would make the same purchase. I really like how easy it is to adjust settings like seal time and vac time. Go for it!

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I bought a 112 a while ago, and I've got to say, I'm not in love. I only get a good pack about 1 out of every 5 bags, even with the vacuum set to 50-60 seconds. While it allows me to use liquids, it's such a colossal pain in the rear to seal, rip open the bag, transfer to a new one, try again, (repeat entire process 3-4 more times), I barely use it.

I actually still use my foodsaver, and when I'm trying to add liquids to it, for the most part, I just freeze them into icecubes and drop them in the bag with whatever else I'm cooking with them. Not ideal, but it's a workaround.

Edited by Dexter (log)
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I bought a 112 a while ago, and I've got to say, I'm not in love. I only get a good pack about 1 out of every 5 bags, even with the vacuum set to 50-60 seconds. While it allows me to use liquids, it's such a colossal pain in the rear to seal, rip open the bag, transfer to a new one, try again, (repeat entire process 3-4 more times), I barely use it.

I actually still use my foodsaver, and when I'm trying to add liquids to it, for the most part, I just freeze them into icecubes and drop them in the bag with whatever else I'm cooking with them. Not ideal, but it's a workaround.

Do you have the entire bag inside the chamber? I was also only getting a good pack in 1 out of 5 until I realized that the end of the bags were sticking outside the chamber (I bought oversized long bags). Once I made sure the entire bag was inside it worked 5 out of 5.

Edited by rob1234 (log)
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I bought a 112 a while ago, and I've got to say, I'm not in love. I only get a good pack about 1 out of every 5 bags, even with the vacuum set to 50-60 seconds.

You machine, bags, procedure or settings are seriously faulty.

First q: Is stuff boiling like crazy at 50s? It should be. And you don't want that.

Edited by Paul Kierstead (log)
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Rob:

I make sure the entire bag is inside the chamber. That shouldn't be the problem at all.

Paul:

Their bags, their instructions, and it's not a problem I've ever had with any other chamber system.

Yes, things are boiling like mad at 50 s. No, I don't want that.

Even when packing dry items, I have air problems - so it's not a faulty seal caused by grease / food / etc inhibiting the heating bar.

Edited by Dexter (log)
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  • 4 months later...

I have used the VP112 for almost a year with good results. It is used daily for light duty tasks such as resealing a block of feta or prepping food for the circulator. Occasionally it has seen all day use in prepping a whole hog or lamb for the freezer and when I make sausage. The 12-inch width is great as you can seal two smaller bags at a time which works out great when you are putting up summer vegetables or one pound packages of sausage. I have used about 600 bags to date with very few failures. I bought a scratch & dent from homebutcher.com for $500 including shipping and was hard pressed to find any blemishes. I also purcashed 1,000 bags which they shipped in the same order for free.

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Steve, I have had a similar experience as you. I feel like the vp112 is a real work horse. I have used it almost daily for almost a year and once I started increasing the seal time to 8 from the preset 5 I haven't had any problems. It is a great tool for the kitchen.

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I decided to jump in here as my view is bit different from any that have yet been expressed. After much consideration between a VP112 and VP210, I purchased a 112 earier this year. While I certainly agree with others that it is a well made machine and that it operates very well, if I had the opportunity to do it again, I would purchase the 210.

The obvious difference between the two is the form factor. If you are planning to use the device on an under-cabinet countertop, the 112 is really your only option. The 210 won't fit (or at least won't open once you get it there). The 112 appears to have been designed specifically for this purpose. However, the trade-off is that the footprint of the machine is materially larger than 210. Given that I live in New York City apartment and lack counter space, I have the unit on a seperate shelving unit and found the footprint of the VP112 to be somewhat unwieldly.

I also would have also preferred the higher chamber of the VP210 to be able to vacuum seal small jars inside the chamber, rather than with the accessory port.

Finally, while the build quality is of the VP112 is very good, I would have preferred the all metal construction of the 210.

For those who own or decide to purchase a VP112, I found a right-angle power cord available on Amazon that allowed me to get the unit at least an inch further back against the wall and with no concern about stressing the cord. The machine really should have shipped with this given that the design is clearly intended for household countertops. As it is, I found it to be $7 very well spent.

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  • 2 weeks later...

All good comments.

In our case, we had some space in our downstairs kitchen and sat the VP112 on top of a rolling "butcher block" table from Ikea. There's room for an assortment of bags below as well as a plastic tub for when we go on a berry-packing binge and need to haul more than several bags upstairs. Haven't played with the vacuum port yet and am beginning to research options for an extnerla container. I found a small vaccum chamber / bell jar like thing that used for evacuating bubbles from casting resin that I may be able to attach, but that's a project for another day.

Overall, very happy with the VP122, it's capacity and the degree of vacuum control. Bought ours on Amazon and very good value for money.

I decided to jump in here as my view is bit different from any that have yet been expressed. After much consideration between a VP112 and VP210, I purchased a 112 earier this year. While I certainly agree with others that it is a well made machine and that it operates very well, if I had the opportunity to do it again, I would purchase the 210.

The obvious difference between the two is the form factor. If you are planning to use the device on an under-cabinet countertop, the 112 is really your only option. The 210 won't fit (or at least won't open once you get it there). The 112 appears to have been designed specifically for this purpose. However, the trade-off is that the footprint of the machine is materially larger than 210. Given that I live in New York City apartment and lack counter space, I have the unit on a seperate shelving unit and found the footprint of the VP112 to be somewhat unwieldly.

I also would have also preferred the higher chamber of the VP210 to be able to vacuum seal small jars inside the chamber, rather than with the accessory port.

Finally, while the build quality is of the VP112 is very good, I would have preferred the all metal construction of the 210.

For those who own or decide to purchase a VP112, I found a right-angle power cord available on Amazon that allowed me to get the unit at least an inch further back against the wall and with no concern about stressing the cord. The machine really should have shipped with this given that the design is clearly intended for household countertops. As it is, I found it to be $7 very well spent.

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  • 10 months later...

Hi

On their website VacMaster say they do not yet ship to the UK/EU zone.

Looking at mharpo's picture above it looks suspiciously like SousVide Supreme Vacuum Chamber http://www.amazon.co.uk/SousVide-Supreme-Chamber-Vacuum-Sealer/dp/B009YYFJGI/ref=sr_1_1?s=kitchen&ie=UTF8&qid=1376302139&sr=1-1&keywords=vacuum+chamber+sealer

Can anyone confirm that these are the same?

Thanks

Tony

btw - that’s one seriously ugly piece of kit

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