• Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

WhiteTruffleGirl

VacMaster VP210 vs. VacMaster VP112

38 posts in this topic

I've decided to take the plunge and buy a chamber vacuum. After two Food Savers crapping out on me, I'm not interested in throwing good money after bad. That, and I'd like to do things like compressing fruits, braising, etc., so a chamber vacuum is a priority.

From what I can tell the VacMaster VP 210 and the VacMaster VP112 are the most value-priced options. (Although being value-priced doesn't necessarily make them the most cost-effective.) I've read snippets about both of these units on some old threads, but am hoping someone can tell me the practical difference between these two units beyond footprint, price and the width of the sealing bar? As well, do you feel they are well built?

I'm ready to pull the trigger, just don't want to make a mistake.

Tx

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A couple things you want to consider -

1) Is the size and especially the depth of the chamber adequate for the product and items you wish to sous vide?

2) You may want to research a vacuum machine that has an oil pump rather than a rotary pump for life and durability

3) Is the width of the seal bar equal to the size bags you intend to use?

4) Some people believe a digital read-out is preferable to an analog guage

Good luck in your decision!


"A cloud o' dust! Could be most anything. Even a whirling dervish.

That, gentlemen, is the whirlingest dervish of them all." - The Professionals by Richard Brooks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for your reply.

I'm not that concerned about the chamber size, as I can always put product into several bags if required. A 10" vs. 12" seal gave me pause for thought, but ultimately, I'm not sure it would be a problem.

Dry piston vs. oil piston does give pause. Although, I'd only really care if it meant a dry piston may last five years, whereas an oil piston may last ten years. Like flat screen TVs and other "high tech" equipment, I suspect I'm playing "early adopter" here, so may be over-buying (paying) for something I'd like to ultimately replace in a few years anyway. Thoughts?


Edited by WhiteTruffleGirl (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've had my VP210 for about a year now and its been fantastic. I've found it to be extremely well built and has stood up to pretty high use for a home kitchen. I had the same concerns over the dry piston but they were really quite unfounded after using this unit so much. I'd highly recommend it for home or small restaurant use.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks sct4a. I'm curious...did you consider the VP112 at all? And, what made you choose the VP210?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nope didnt consider the VP112 at all really. I was interested in something that would be highly reliable and well-built that would be able to reach a high level of vacuum for compression. IIRC the VP210 can reach a higher level than the VP112 when I spoke with the ARY rep. The VP112 also didnt look as sturdy and well-built as the VP210. It sort of appeared to me as a cheap knockoff entry model for the home/sous vide market they just became aware existed. I then brought the specs for the VP210 into a restaurant that does alot of sous vide in NYC and had the chef take a look who was kind enough to give his opinion. He wasn't able to find much of any difference between the VP210 and the one they use other than the speed and qty of bags you could seal per hour. Since I wasn't planning on doing 75+ bags an hour the VP210 was perfect for me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had the same thought about the VP112. I think I'm going to go for the VP210. It's an investment, but worth it. Thanks for your input.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have you purchased the VP210 yet? The research I have done says the 112 and the 210 have exactly the same pump/motor and at over 50 pounds the 112 must have some substance to it (although it does make me wonder what the other 40 pounds of the 210 is made of).

Regardless of what the ARY rep told SCT4a, according to all literature, they reach the same vacuum and with the same pump and motor the longevity should be similar (if you look closely at pictures of each, the controls look very similar also).

I have ordered the VP112 from Quality Matters for 599.00, no tax and free shipping. I thought about the VP210 and was not concerned about the difference in price, more the weight of the unit and wondering what you are really getting for the price difference. If you are really concerned about higher quality than the VP112, I would not buy the VP210, but rather the VP215 with its more powerful oil pump. For less than 100.00 more than the VP215 you get more power and longevity than the 210. Quality Matters has this ready to ship for less than 1000.00 dollars.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess I should say, no affiliation with Quality Matters, they just gave me a great price with very quick shipping and were there to answer my questions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I thought about the VP210 and was not concerned about the difference in price, more the weight of the unit and wondering what you are really getting for the price difference. If you are really concerned about higher quality than the VP112, I would not buy the VP210, but rather the VP215 with its more powerful oil pump. For less than 100.00 more than the VP215 you get more power and longevity than the 210. Quality Matters has this ready to ship for less than 1000.00 dollars.

I have a VP112 for much the same reason as flightcook - if I could see a vast difference in performance or quality in the VP210, I would have bought it, but the size/weight difference between the two made the 112 much more attractive to me. I've had it almost a year now and absolutely no regrets.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Between the VP210 and VP112, I'd choose the VP112, since performance and durability are going to be similar.

However, the oil pump based VP215 should last considerably longer than the dry rocker pump VP210 and VP112, and if you're interested in compression, the VP215 has a much higher maximum vacuum than the VP210. The difference between 94%(VP210) and 99%(VP215) for compression purposes is significant.

PS: Chamber vacuums in the home definately fall into the "early adopter" catagory, but these machines have been around for a long time and the technology involved is pretty basic, so no need to be concerned about "bugs" that might have to be worked out.


Edited by GlowingGhoul (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've had my 112 for a while now and it's a quality machine. I also had to decide (could have bought either one), and what finally made it for me was the weight difference. I knew that mine would NOT be in my kitchen and would be stored somewhere else. The thought of trying to horse around with the 90 lb. 210 vs. the 50 lb. 112 was the difference for me.

I thought that the 210 had options for a double sealer bar and hte 112 has doesn't. In the end I'm very happy with the 112 and belive I made the right decision (for my needs). Good luck and have fun!

Todd in Chicago

EDIT: P.S. I got my VP112 from Conrad over at Homestead Harvest as was recommended by this forum. I also purchased 1000 of the medium sized bags and 1000 of the larger sized bags. I think when buying them in bulk like that, with shipping and tax I belive they came out to about 8 or 10 cents a bag.


Edited by Todd in Chicago (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a VP112 for much the same reason as flightcook - if I could see a vast difference in performance or quality in the VP210, I would have bought it, but the size/weight difference between the two made the 112 much more attractive to me. I've had it almost a year now and absolutely no regrets.

I should agree on this one as well. I think it is one of the most popular model in the market today. Size/weight difference of the 112 is what makes this model stand out against the 210.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

VP215 has a much higher maximum vacuum than the VP210. The difference between 94%(VP210) and 99%(VP215) for compression purposes is significant.

Does the difference in vacuum make a difference for sous viding? Is there a problem with bags floating more with the VP210 vs the VP215 because there is more air left in them?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My VP210 will easily boil water at room temperatures or so, and typically with anything slightly wet, I have to monitor it to prevent boiling. I think the VP210 will pull more then adequate vacuum for the vast majority of cases, particularly if there is any vapour in the chamber which will limit the vacuum that can be generated in any case. Most food applications will have some vapour.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cookman...

I believe that the 210 and 215 are bigger brothers of the 112. I have the 112 and you can make the vacuum pretty much as tight as you want. The only time I've had problems with bags floating are with vegetables (doesn't matter what sealer you use, possible to run into gas release problems), and when purposefully do not pull a heavy vacuum, such as when not wanting to "crush" fish.

Cheers...

Todd in Chicago

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Todd,

Can you measure your 112 for me? I am interested in front to back numbers. I would like to place this machine in a drawer in my base cabinets and need to know if this will fit. I know they say 24" but I want to see some real world numbers.

Thanks


Anthony

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Adefiore.....

Just measured....24 inches is an accurate measure, including the plastic piece that sticks out the back for the plug. I would say if you could spare a 1/2 inch or inch, the cord wouldn't be bent at a crazy 90 degree angle.

Love this machine....it's a perfect match for my SVS.

Cheers....

Todd in Chicago

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Todd,

Thanks for the measurement. I was hoping you would tell me that the 24 was a little on the long side. I would need it to be 23 or 23 1/4 to fit. I guess I need to plan for this to just sit on the counter, don't tell my wife.


Anthony

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a VP112 and love it. I bought it for the form factor as moving aroung the other ones is basically impossible. No regrets here.

Mike

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

do you guys leave them on the counter or have some place to put it in between uses?


Anthony

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I also settled on the 112 because of convenience issues and it has worked great for my needs. I put mine on an old TV cart w/casters and roll it somewhere out of the way when not in use.

Photo2.jpg


Edited by mharpo (log)

Michael Harp

CopperPans.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

LOL....

Mine is stored on top of my dryer in the laundry room! I cover it with a towel so no debris gets in when not in use. I LOVE this machine, but my better half would never have it on display...even if it is shiny....and beautiful...and perfect. LOL...

Todd in Chicago

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Any suggestions of where to buy the VP112 and bags in Canada?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Any suggestions of where to buy the VP112 and bags in Canada?

I called QualityMatters.com to order my VP112 and they have a $15 off coupon code for Egullet members - It's EG-VP112. I don't know if they ship to Canada, though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By bhsimon
      I want to make mint spheres for use in a hot sauce. (Think lamb with mint caviar.)   Can this be done? Is it possible to make heat-stable spheres?   What is the most effective way to extract mint flavour from the raw leaves? I don't want the resulting spheres to contain alcohol as it will be served to children. My cursory investigations indicate that glycerol may be an alternative—has anyone done this?
    • By boudin noir
      I recently did some halibut steaks sous vide. They were about 1 1/2  inches thick. I did them for 30 minutes at 122 degrees. When i took them out to brown them, they were very fragile. As I browned them they fell apart. They were delicious, perfectly cooked from an eating point of view, but ugly. Too hot, too long or both?
    • By bhsimon
      Anyone tried this?
       
      I'm trying to think of something novel to do for my friends at an upcoming birthday weekend. We are renting a house in the Hunter Valley (Australian wine region) and food is a major component of our weekend. Last time I did fizzy fruit—the grapes and oranges were awesome and everyone enjoyed the unique experience. I want to do something quirky like that again.
       
      The whipping siphon is easy to transport so I'm interested in using it. The siphoned soufflé in Modernist Cuisine, volume 4 page 297, has a chocolate variation that does not require propylene glycol alginate or maltodextrin (I don't have those things in my pantry, yet). That looks like it might be a good one to try. Anyone done that and have some advice for me before I dive in?
    • By bhsimon
      Besides the health concerns, deep frying steak is the best way to get an even colour and crust on steak. In my most recent experiment, I tried the technique of deep frying prior to, and after, cooking the steak sous vide. In the past, I had only fried the meat after it had been cooked.
       
      The meat was veal chops. As can often be the case, the meat was mishandled somewhere along the way. The obvious signs of this were indentations in the surface. This kind of thing makes it tricky to pan fry and get even colour.
       


       
      This soft meat is also tricky to vacuum seal as it can often be further compressed and misshapen in the process.
       
      I was delighted to observe that a short 45 seconds in hot oil fixed both of these issues! I didn't expect that. Nice. The meat plumped up and that indentation was gone. It also held its shape nicely when vacuum packed.
       

       
      Time and temperature matters. The difference can be just a few seconds or degrees. In the next picture, the time was the same but the oil was 20°C hotter for the steak on the left and the crust is noticeably darker. My next experiment will try 30 seconds at 200°C before and after.
       


      The goal is to keep the crust as thin as possible.
       

       
      I hadn't anticipated the secondary benefits of deep frying prior to sous vide. The plumping of the meat and slight firmness made them easy to package and present. I am curious whether anyone has observed this. I am also curious if it would it work in hot water, rather than oil.



    • By Porthos
      I have purchased an Anova circulator. My interest in sous vide is based upon needing to prepare chicken and pork dishes that remain more moist than other cooking methods I have used. This is based upon needing more moistness for my wife. After her bariactric surgery she became sensitive to meat that is not still very moist.
       
      I would like recommendations for some threads to read through to help get me started.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.