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What New Ingredients Are You Trying Out?


Chris Amirault
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I got a couple unfamiliar citrus recently that I am not sure how to make the best use of: kaffir limes (the fruit, not the leaves),...

FrogPrincesse, you can wrap the whole kaffir limes individually in plastic wrap, and keep them in the freezer. They will last at least a year (I've been told). Cut off as much peel as you need at any time, and put the lime back in the freezer. That's how I keep my kaffir limes. The limes are most commonly used for their peel in Thai curry pastes.

Thanks for this great tip, djyee100!

Your dates look beautiful. I love Medjools too. I am not so familiar with the other varieties but now I am intrigued!

I tried the yuzu limes in a mojito tonight but was somewhat underwhelmed. Their flavor was a little too subtle to play well in that drink I think.

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  • 2 months later...

Cherimoya:

Had one at my GF's house and the taste/texture was fascinating. Toots said that it was a somewhat over ripe fruit, and that one closer to ideal ripeness would be much nicer. Discovered that they're grown locally - in California - so getting them should not be too difficult.

Any preparation suggestions?

Thanks!

Shel, this might be too late for this season's Chirimoyas, but they're flat out amazing when simply quartered and popped in the freezer for 20-30 minutes. The result is something like the finest ice-cream you've ever had, but with a fruity texture (and of course the seeds). A good friend in Loja introduced me to Chirimoya this way about 4 years ago, and I was hooked.

Well, that's a nice, simple idea. Will definitely try it!

They are also amazing gently candied in light syrup, and blendered with vanilla yogurt (remove the seeds and use only the pulp) as a shake.

Seems like an interesting idea as well, although the idea of adding additional sugar is something to which I'm resistant.

And of course if you're looking for a use for the seeds, you can dry and powder them and use that to kill cockroaches (it's very effective.)

No roach problems here, but we do get invaded by ants every now and then. Will this get rid of ants? We've used cinnamon with good results, and we're always loking for new ways to use leftover food scraps. Hmmm ....maybe that's an idea for a new thread.

 ... Shel


 

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  • 1 year later...

Bumping this very interesting thread with vincotto (reduced, caramelised grape must) and spirulina (an algae).

Spirulina has the most offensive odour of any food I've encountered, and also a very repugnant and nauseating flavour, but transforms by some arcane process into magical delicious when added to other foods in quantities of about half a teaspoon of algae per litre of other. It also makes the food a very beautiful turqoise colour. It tastes more similar to land vegetables, maybe a sweet cabbage, than other sea vegetables of my acquaintance, not salty, and quite mineral. It tastes very green.

Vincotta tastes very richly sour and sweet, almost approaching balsamic vinegar or raspberries. It is apparently best served with dairy products, which I haven't tried, but can be added to almost anything, including desserts, meat, fruit and vegetables, and drunk in solution. I will try it in cocktails. I would like just to pour it into my mouth but then I'd run out.

Edited by Plantes Vertes (log)
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Not posted on here for a very long time but feel like getting back into it again.

I have been messing about with very cheap cuts and seeing what can be done with sous vide. I have already knocked out a few beef skirt recipes.

What I have found is that using the vac bags really does make such a huge difference to the final taste/texture and most importantly, flavour.

I am trying some tomatoes with balsamic tonight, see how that turns out. It is to go with a piece of Halibut so hope it works out.

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Bumping this very interesting thread with vincotto (reduced, caramelised grape must) and spirulina (an algae).

Spirulina has the most offensive odour of any food I've encountered, and also a very repugnant and nauseating flavour, but transforms by some arcane process into magical delicious when added to other foods in quantities of about half a teaspoon of algae per litre of other. It also makes the food a very beautiful turqoise colour. It tastes more similar to land vegetables, maybe a sweet cabbage, than other sea vegetables of my acquaintance, not salty, and quite mineral. It tastes very green.

Vincotta tastes very richly sour and sweet, almost approaching balsamic vinegar or raspberries. It is apparently best served with dairy products, which I haven't tried, but can be added to almost anything, including desserts, meat, fruit and vegetables, and drunk in solution. I will try it in cocktails. I would like just to pour it into my mouth but then I'd run out.

Is Vincotta (vincotto?) the same thing as saba? I love saba drizzled on fresh ricotta. Delicious. It also works (in small touches) with salads with bitter greens.

Regarding spirulina, I haven't tried it on its own but it's one of the ingredients in Green Machine, a green juice/smoothie made by Naked Juice that I really like. It's used in small quantities (1.3 g in 450 mL) but you can still taste it. I crave that mineral flavor every once in a while.

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A few weeks ago, when making a simple red bell pepper agrodolce, I became convinced that the sweet/sour syrup leftover from making them could be used in something or other. Turns out that half an ounce or so added to your typical margarita is most excellent.

Chris Amirault

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Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

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Bumping this very interesting thread with vincotto (reduced, caramelised grape must) and spirulina (an algae).

Spirulina has the most offensive odour of any food I've encountered, and also a very repugnant and nauseating flavour, but transforms by some arcane process into magical delicious when added to other foods in quantities of about half a teaspoon of algae per litre of other. It also makes the food a very beautiful turqoise colour. It tastes more similar to land vegetables, maybe a sweet cabbage, than other sea vegetables of my acquaintance, not salty, and quite mineral. It tastes very green.

Vincotta tastes very richly sour and sweet, almost approaching balsamic vinegar or raspberries. It is apparently best served with dairy products, which I haven't tried, but can be added to almost anything, including desserts, meat, fruit and vegetables, and drunk in solution. I will try it in cocktails. I would like just to pour it into my mouth but then I'd run out.

Is Vincotta (vincotto?) the same thing as saba? I love saba drizzled on fresh ricotta. Delicious. It also works (in small touches) with salads with bitter greens.

Regarding spirulina, I haven't tried it on its own but it's one of the ingredients in Green Machine, a green juice/smoothie made by Naked Juice that I really like. It's used in small quantities (1.3 g in 450 mL) but you can still taste it. I crave that mineral flavor every once in a while.

Vincotto - sorry, vincotta was a typo.

Yes, apparently they're regional names for the same stuff, and it can also be called sapa (saba/sapa I think must mean juice, like sap/sève) and mosto cotto. Vincotto/mosto cotto mean cooked wine/must.

I tried it most recently on a salad of frisee and roasted figs. It was really good!

The spirulina communicates well with other green things too, and is very pleasant in soup. It seems to complement something slightly sweet like celeriac soup with some pulped apple. But don't eat it on it's own! You'll curse your curiosity forever :huh:.

It's much beloved of juicing enthusiasts. In fact I tried making cabbage and spirulina juice before Christmas in a misguided fit of health-consciousness, and I even managed to pretend to like it for a few days.... I've gone back to normal now :biggrin:

Edited by Plantes Vertes (log)
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A few weeks ago, when making a simple red bell pepper agrodolce, I became convinced that the sweet/sour syrup leftover from making them could be used in something or other. Turns out that half an ounce or so added to your typical margarita is most excellent.

Ah, you beat me to it! I might mix one of those up with my vincotto while I figure out what other drinks I can put it in :biggrin:

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I'm a little embarrassed to admit that mine is a kitchen staple for many; Fennel. I've really never used it much until recently. There is a recipe in an ancient (circa 1965) New York Times cookbook (Craig Claiborne) for Italian tossed salad that has fennel, lettuce, walnuts, capers and boiled egg with a vinaigrette. I am loving that salad right now and it turns out that the fennel makes it come together.

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It's not real new but I have been using a lot of Argan oil (the roasted culinary type) - I used to use it with couscous, etc., but lately have used it on so many different things.

A "finishing" oil on pasta (especially good with duck and truffle ravioli I made a few days ago), on omelets, on braised rather bland vegetables and even on baked potatoes.

The flavor seem to enhance so many things. It's not cheap but to me it is worth every penny...

Edited by andiesenji (log)

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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It's not real new but I have been using a lot of Argan oil (the roasted culinary type) - I used to use it with couscous, etc., but lately have used it on so many different things.

A "finishing" oil on pasta (especially good with duck and truffle ravioli I made a few days ago), on omelets, on braised rather bland vegetables and even on baked potatoes.

The flavor seem to enhance so many things. It's not cheap but to me it is worth every penny...

Argan oil could ruin me if I used it as much as I'd like - it is a really great ingredient. Do you know what the difference is between the cosmetic and the culinary types?

Edited by Plantes Vertes (log)
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Rutabaga. Even the guy at the checkout didn't know what it was (he rang it up as beets, but they were the same price so I let it slide). Simply roasted in a 425℉ oven, with salt, pepper and olive oil - quite good.

Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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It's not real new but I have been using a lot of Argan oil (the roasted culinary type) - I used to use it with couscous, etc., but lately have used it on so many different things.

A "finishing" oil on pasta (especially good with duck and truffle ravioli I made a few days ago), on omelets, on braised rather bland vegetables and even on baked potatoes.

The flavor seem to enhance so many things. It's not cheap but to me it is worth every penny...

Argan oil could ruin me if I used it as much as I'd like - it is a really great ingredient. Do you know what the difference is between the cosmetic and the culinary types?

The culinary type is from roasted Argan nuts - that are inside a fruit. The pressed raw oil that is used in cosmetics does not have the flavor that is so desirable.

I made a pound of butter this morning and to half of it added some Argan oil after pressing out all the liquid. It is delicious!

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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It's not real new but I have been using a lot of Argan oil (the roasted culinary type) - I used to use it with couscous, etc., but lately have used it on so many different things.

A "finishing" oil on pasta (especially good with duck and truffle ravioli I made a few days ago), on omelets, on braised rather bland vegetables and even on baked potatoes.

The flavor seem to enhance so many things. It's not cheap but to me it is worth every penny...

Argan oil could ruin me if I used it as much as I'd like - it is a really great ingredient. Do you know what the difference is between the cosmetic and the culinary types?

The culinary type is from roasted Argan nuts - that are inside a fruit. The pressed raw oil that is used in cosmetics does not have the flavor that is so desirable.

I made a pound of butter this morning and to half of it added some Argan oil after pressing out all the liquid. It is delicious!

If I ever make a pound of butter I'll try it!

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It's not real new but I have been using a lot of Argan oil (the roasted culinary type) - I used to use it with couscous, etc., but lately have used it on so many different things.

A "finishing" oil on pasta (especially good with duck and truffle ravioli I made a few days ago), on omelets, on braised rather bland vegetables and even on baked potatoes.

The flavor seem to enhance so many things. It's not cheap but to me it is worth every penny...

Argan oil could ruin me if I used it as much as I'd like - it is a really great ingredient. Do you know what the difference is between the cosmetic and the culinary types?

The culinary type is from roasted Argan nuts - that are inside a fruit. The pressed raw oil that is used in cosmetics does not have the flavor that is so desirable.

I made a pound of butter this morning and to half of it added some Argan oil after pressing out all the liquid. It is delicious!

If I ever make a pound of butter I'll try it!

Butter is really very easy to make if you have a stand mixer - my demo uses a Thermomix which breaks the cream in 4 minutes instead of 8 to 10 minutes but otherwise it is exactly the same.

The flavor is so much better than commercial butter. And you don't need a butter mold, just shape it by hand.

Butter process.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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It's not real new but I have been using a lot of Argan oil (the roasted culinary type) - I used to use it with couscous, etc., but lately have used it on so many different things.

A "finishing" oil on pasta (especially good with duck and truffle ravioli I made a few days ago), on omelets, on braised rather bland vegetables and even on baked potatoes.

The flavor seem to enhance so many things. It's not cheap but to me it is worth every penny...

Argan oil could ruin me if I used it as much as I'd like - it is a really great ingredient. Do you know what the difference is between the cosmetic and the culinary types?

The culinary type is from roasted Argan nuts - that are inside a fruit. The pressed raw oil that is used in cosmetics does not have the flavor that is so desirable.

I made a pound of butter this morning and to half of it added some Argan oil after pressing out all the liquid. It is delicious!

If I ever make a pound of butter I'll try it!

Butter is really very easy to make if you have a stand mixer - my demo uses a Thermomix which breaks the cream in 4 minutes instead of 8 to 10 minutes but otherwise it is exactly the same.

The flavor is so much better than commercial butter. And you don't need a butter mold, just shape it by hand.

Butter process.

Thank you - I'll give it a go! In fact I half-knew that this could be done from times when I've over-whipped cream (only once or twice of course... :blush: put some icing sugar in to rescue it if this accident ever befalls you) but had never been smart enough to realise you could carry on and make proper butter. And I have just been to Brittany and brought back the grey sel de Guerande that is used in the demo. My mother loves butter so perhaps this would make a nice gift as well as an exciting adventure.

Edit: I think this is actually your own blog, in fact? In that case thanks twice!

Edited by Plantes Vertes (log)
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Rutabaga. Even the guy at the checkout didn't know what it was (he rang it up as beets, but they were the same price so I let it slide). Simply roasted in a 425℉ oven, with salt, pepper and olive oil - quite good.

Rutabaga is really nice in stews with pork belly. You could add also some raisins towards the end to have nice balance between the earthiness if the rutabaga and the sweetness of the raisins

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Rutabaga. Even the guy at the checkout didn't know what it was (he rang it up as beets, but they were the same price so I let it slide). Simply roasted in a 425℉ oven, with salt, pepper and olive oil - quite good.

Rutabaga is really nice in stews with pork belly. You could add also some raisins towards the end to have nice balance between the earthiness if the rutabaga and the sweetness of the raisins

I like it and the sweetness contributes nicely to other vegetables and is exceptionally good in spicy combinations.

If you like curry, try cutting the rutabaga into "matchsticks" or "batonnets" and preparing them this way and use a serving as a BASE on which you serve chicken curry - or whatever curry you like.

This root vegetable has the advantage of being LOW in carbs - 1/3 the carbs in potatoes.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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I just burned through a 100 g (3.5 oz) bag of malt powder. It's great stuff.

I picked it up in Copenhagen a few weeks ago (where I am, the shops don't run to such 'exotica'), since I wanted to experiment with using it in bread, and ended up putting the stuff in everything I could think of (hot chocolate! like Ovaltine, but with flavour), then wanted to think of more things to us it in, and suddenly (about 10 days after I began my malt binge) realized I was down to just a bit of dust clinging to the inside of the bag.

Michaela, aka "Mjx"
Manager, eG Forums
mscioscia@egstaff.org

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Rutabaga. Even the guy at the checkout didn't know what it was (he rang it up as beets, but they were the same price so I let it slide). Simply roasted in a 425℉ oven, with salt, pepper and olive oil - quite good.

Rutabaga is really nice in stews with pork belly. You could add also some raisins towards the end to have nice balance between the earthiness if the rutabaga and the sweetness of the raisins

I like it and the sweetness contributes nicely to other vegetables and is exceptionally good in spicy combinations.

If you like curry, try cutting the rutabaga into "matchsticks" or "batonnets" and preparing them this way and use a serving as a BASE on which you serve chicken curry - or whatever curry you like.

This root vegetable has the advantage of being LOW in carbs - 1/3 the carbs in potatoes.

Rutabaga, mashed (not whipped) with a good bit of pepper, salt and a TON of butter is a must on my holiday tables! No sugar, no maple syrup, nothing sweet but the veg. itself. Yum!

"Commit random acts of senseless kindness"

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