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Favorite Tea When you Feel Ill


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I am wondering what others here drink when they have a cold, fever, flu, or just feel lousy. Do you drink it because it makes you feel better, or due to a homeopathic benefit?

Thanks!

"Salt is born of the purest of parents: the sun and the sea." --Pythagoras.

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A black tea with a healthy jolt of ginger - usually candied but sometimes fresh.

I always have candied ginger on hand and simply mash a slice or two, put it in the bottom of my cup and pour in the brewed tea.

I also often infuse some sage leaves with the tea as it too is helpful when I am feeling a bit "off" or feverish. This is a fairly rare event.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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Mother's remedy was always tea with lemon and honey. Always worked and I use it to this day.

'A person's integrity is never more tested than when he has power over a voiceless creature.' A C Grayling.

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I still drink tea when I'm sick because I'll get a headache if I don't, but if I'm congested, the taste / aroma won't be as enjoyable, so usually I stick to something that's just Ok, so as not to waste tea.

Sometimes I will have just plain hot water, an herbal tisane or hot water with lemon and honey (and / or whisky), though.

or due to a homeopathic benefit?

Not to be overly pedantic, but I'm not sure you quite understand what homeopathy is (I didn't either, until last year).

Edited by Will (log)
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During my last bout with a nasty upper respiratory infection I discovered that the Lemon flavored Thera-Flu tasted much better when I also steeped a tea ball filled with my favorite Star of India tea into it, and then added a shot of spiced rum or bourbon. Knocked me out, tasted good and made me feel a whole lot better. I also generally have some Lemon-Ginger syrup in the fridge and a little splash of that is good with it too.

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
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In my house, we kids always got "Vitamin C Tea" when we felt a cold coming on.

You crush a bunch of Vitamin C tabs, then add hot water to whatever strength you wish, and honey to taste.

Yes, there were also "Hot Toddies" in the house - bourbon, lemon juice and honey - but the grownups took those, primarily to help them deal with a bunch of sick kids.

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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If it's a gastric problem, it's ginger tea.

If I have a muscle ache, I use chamomile.

If I have a fever, cold or flu - green tea with honey, lemon, and Jacquin's Rock 'N Rye.

Theresa :smile:

"Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man's character, give him power."

- Abraham Lincoln

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General sickness: some kind of black tea; that's what my mother always brought us when we were sick in bed. Still soothes.

Bad sore throat or serious congestion: skip the tea, make a toddy. Although I am a big fan of tea, honey, and lemon individually, I've never liked them together. Unfortunately, I once ran out of bourbon and made all my toddies that winter with single-malt scotch someone had brought me. (I enjoy scotch only after very rich meals, so it tends to last a while.) Now I can't drink toddies with bourbon any more. On the other hand, I no longer use a single malt, either. I drink the toddies primarily because they work. Nothing else cuts the pain of a bad sore throat (think strep or the like) quite the same way or as quickly. They need to be scalding hot, though.

Edited by faith (log)
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That is my grandmother's recipe. I think she knew what to do with booze - true story - she used to make bathtub gin and sell it from her candy store, during Prohibition. LOL!

Theresa :smile:

"Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man's character, give him power."

- Abraham Lincoln

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Rosehip tea for a slightly sore throat. Mint tea for sinus stuff. My grandmother's hot toddy (honey, lemon, hot water, and Wild Turkey until it looks like tea) for everything else. I would say that was what the grownups drank when they were sick, but I always got a small one once it didn't have to be in a sippy cup. I slept, I felt better, and I turned out mostly ok. And since the Wild Turkey was for medicinal purposes only, my grandmother was always able to say that she never drank alcohol.

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I have been working though my can of Rishi's green tea mint blend of the past week. I've had an elevated temperature and it seems to help, especially the soothing mint.

I'll have to try a hot toddie or two. If anything, it will help me forget about it for a while.

Maybe I'll also give the blend of green tea with honey, lemon, and Jacquin's Rock 'N Rye that tmirga enjoys.

Dan

"Salt is born of the purest of parents: the sun and the sea." --Pythagoras.

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Bad sore throat or serious congestion: skip the tea, make a toddy. Although I am a big fan of tea, honey, and lemon individually, I've never liked them together. Unfortunately, I once ran out of bourbon and made all my toddies that winter with single-malt scotch someone had brought me. (I enjoy scotch only after very rich meals, so it tends to last a while.) Now I can't drink toddies with bourbon any more. On the other hand, I no longer use a single malt, either. I drink the toddies primarily because they work. Nothing else cuts the pain of a bad sore throat (think strep or the like) quite the same way or as quickly. They need to be scalding hot, though.

I was always told that the original "Hot Toddy" was a Scottish drink and therefore made, of course, with Scotch. I had both Irish and Scots ancestors, all of whom eventually landed in the American South, bourbon country.

So the Hot Toddy argument could get lively in our family.

But the Scottish side of the family maintained that a proper Hot Toddy was Scotch, boiling water, lemon, honey, cloves and cinnamon.

Edited by Jaymes (log)

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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Tazo Refresh is really good when you're congested or nauseated...the mint is helpful for both conditions. I also drink the Silver Rain white tea from Republic of Tea when I just feel overall crummy, since it's mild and soothing to sip without too much caffeine. I don't know if it's the placebo effect, but I always feel better afterwards.

If you ate pasta and antipasto, would you still be hungry? ~Author Unknown

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Not tea per se but my sick drink is steeped ginger. I don't bother peeling the ginger just slice into discs and let it simmer in water for a little while. Maybe a small amount of honey but not necessarily. I use this mostly for colds but often drink it just for the comfort of it.

For a funny stomach I like whatever silver needles tea I have on hand. Lately I've been drinking Norbu's silver needle tea and it is greatly comforting on a cold night funny tummy or not.

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