Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

The Food Saver/Vacuum Sealer Topic, 2011 to Present


Recommended Posts

"""    year's worth of beef  """

 

money right there.  a long time ago, several years +   Test Kitchen did a review of ways to freeze stuff.

 

this was pre SV for me but I had the Bug , a small one at that time

 

the only item they reviewd that stood the test of time in the freezer was the Weston item w their 3 or 3.5 MIL bags

 

it was not cheap  450 or so.  but after a lot of hemming and hawwing I did get this

 

I still have stuff in my freezer that has no burn Nada from about this time.

 

maybe you know some one w 3.5 to 4MI; bags that can help you out ?

Link to post
Share on other sites

BTW

 

what's a 1/16 of a cow ?  its easy to see a 1/4 front or back

 

what are you actually getting and how do they deliver it ?  

 

in traditional butcher paper ?  frozen  ?

 

what does the 1/16 cost ?  ( just curious   :huh: )

 

in this day and age it might not be hard to find a way to get those "sub-primals" Vac'd

 

as a cost over your year to be good value as there will not be any loss.

Edited by rotuts (log)
Link to post
Share on other sites

BTW

 

what's a 1/16 of a cow ?  its easy to see a 1/4 front or back

 

what are you actually getting and how do they deliver it ?  

 

in traditional butcher paper ?  frozen  ?

 

what does the 1/16 cost ?  ( just curious   :huh: )

 

in this day and age it might not be hard to find a way to get those "sub-primals" Vac'd

 

as a cost over your year to be good value as there will not be any loss.

 

1/16 of a cow is nearly 48lbs of beef. It's a sort of cow-share thing, where other people are also getting the same amount (some crazy people are even getting 1/8th!). It's delivered frozen and butchered into various cuts - I don't know what I'll be getting but according to the people that went in for it last year, it's a pretty fair and even distribution of cuts. But it's NOT in primal form.

 

Total for parts and labor, as it were, comes to just a hair over $3/lb for organic, grass-fed beef.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

OK

 

48 X 3 / lbs = 144 bucks

 

get some help  maybe take the paks to a restaurant you know and ask for their help

 

got a good  freezer ?

 

you do this your self, organic or not, w what you might get and try :

 

over that year you will loose at least 1/3 d to " inexperience "  also know some places as

 

"" cheap  "" and less than bright  ( ie stupid  ) 

 

do this  properly and you are on your way.

Edited by rotuts (log)
Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been using the original Italian food saver for the last 6 months. Bought it on ebay for 75 bucks, though I'm sure you can get it cheaper. What's expensive are the bags. I buy vacustrip bags because they tend to be a little more sturdy.

 

I've never had any other vacuum sealing instrument before so I have nothing to compare it to, but it works decently, although there is a learning curve.  It's by no means professional or restaurant quality. You also need to make sure all the parts on it like the gaskets and seals are replaced. I tried sealing everything in the freezer with a Waring Pro vacuum gun but the bags often lost their seal in the freezer and they often got punctured in the process of vacuuming. 

 

Overall though, it was money well spent. I had to trash over half my freezer stock due to freezer burn and nasty off flavors.  Everything is now safely vacuum sealed and no reports of weird flavors or freezer burn yet

 

Btw don't want to derail too much but what program are you doing cow-shares under?

Edited by takadi (log)
Link to post
Share on other sites

I honestly don't know, a friend and his girlfriend told me about it, a friend of theirs knows a farmer, or something on those lines.

 

As for the Italian foodsavers, the ones on eBay now are pricy! Also, is there a problem with current production Foodsaver-branded bags?

Edited by Hassouni (log)
Link to post
Share on other sites

I use a vacuum sealer several times a week. 

 

At my hobby/job doing catering prep I seal product for SV, usually in the company Sous Vide branded strip sealer - a CHEAP machine thats probably made by Food Saver.  It works, though it huffs and puffs and occasionally fails.  Everytime I use it I wonder if it will be the last time.  But I've sealed hundreds of products over the last few years.  To ensure product stays sealed in the bath I always double seal.  Product must be dry, no marinades but seasoning rub is ok.  This machine would be adequate for home freezing, though not my first choice.

 

When I know I'll have a lot of sealing to do I bring in my home strip sealer,  a Cabella's branded unit that (I think) is made by Weston.  Faster, can do some liquid, more reliable seal.  I bought this when I was doing primarily home freezing with a little bit of SV.  Still use it with some freezing, trips to deer camp or when I want to take a sealer on the road.  It's very adequate, a little north of $200 on sale.  I would suggest this to anyone wanting a very good sealer, albeit with the limitations of a strip sealer.

 

When I started to play with more SV, do infusions, etc. I bought a Vacmaster VP112.   This is the mother for me and (I hope) my last stop in sealerville.  It's the heaviest 50 lbs I've ever picked up and is not mobile. 

 

This morning's pork tenders:

 

2014-10-29%2019.15.50.jpg

 

 

FS sealer:

 

2014-10-29%2019.39.48.jpg

 

Beef tenders:  (Knew I was doing a couple cases of them)

 

2014-02-13%2016.28.34.jpg

 

At the end of the day the FS can be had for under a $100, adequate for freezing, can do SV though limited to dry herbs and butter for seasoning.  A good strip sealer can do well with freezing, adequate for basic SV with minimal amounts of liquid added.  The chamber can do both well but is pricey.  The cheapest 112 I found was $600 and change.

 

The cheapest pre-cut bags I've found are at vacuum sealers unlimited.  They also have the sealer units. 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

If you get a Food Saver, buy two because the one will give out when you need it most. Only thing in favor of FS is small size and sometimes price.

 

Unfortunately mass-market appliances have their price driven down to the absolute lowest because of demands from the Wal*Marts and Targets. Only way to get   there is to make a cheap POS.

Link to post
Share on other sites

ah, non-cheap you want.

 

I think the next step up would be the Weston/

 

http://www.harvestessentials.com/32222.html?utm_source=googleshopping&utm_medium=cse&gclid=CILIrqfj1MECFVNk7AodUnUAhw

 

which is what i have.   lasted 3 years w serious use, then the pump had to be repalced  :  about 150 $$

 

Cabelas I know nothing about

 

http://www.cabelas.com/catalog/search.cmd?form_state=searchForm&N=0&fsch=true&Ntk=AllProducts&Ntt=vacuum+sealers&x=0&y=0

 

329 449 or so

Link to post
Share on other sites

no

 

it has nothing to do with who makes it

 

it has to do with there seem to be two different kind of pumps "

 

oil-less    a bit cheaper   this has nothing to do w FoodSaver  where I guess you might have to review the posts above

 

those with oil that you change from time to time.  I have no idea how the 'oil' pumps deal with water vapor but they do.

 

the pumps that have oil are much heavier and more expensive

 

I do love the Weston.  as Ive said i work stunningly well for 3 years, the the humidity etc damaged the oil-less pump and it needed to be

 

replaced.  I got it as the Test Kitchen a long time ago reviewed sealing systems that you then put in your freezer.

 

the weston system   at that time, with the weston bags had no freezer burn what so ever.  at one month the FoodSaver 

 

had freezer burn that would have destroyed what ever you had in the freezer.

Link to post
Share on other sites

so what ?

 

the issue and only one is water and the life time of the pump with water..

 

some times we read to much

 

get the thickest plastic bag you can find for the VAC you choose to afford.

 

dont waste that meat which a thin cheap bag

 

how ever, if you can eat it in a month

 

you have few worries

Edited by rotuts (log)
Link to post
Share on other sites

You can also put a strip of paper towel across the opening. In practice, I've not found a huge use for chamber vacs. If you're doing sous vide with a liquid, I prefer using ziplocs over vacuum sealing anyway. If you're prepping stuff for storage, most of the things you want to prep are either completely dry or mostly liquid. Mostly liquid stuff does fine in a ziploc using displacement which is a lot faster than vacuuming.

The one area it would be helpful is if you wanted to freeze a lot of meat with marinade which I never do. In that case, you can also freeze the meat first, then seal after it's frozen.

  • Like 2

PS: I am a guy.

Link to post
Share on other sites

So i hope some of you can help me with a small issue on my sealer i have experienced.

I own a Komet topVac sealer and am quite happy with it.

However, what i have experienced recently and whats really annoying is that i have the feeling the sealer is not working correctly.

No air is seeking but i can open the bags easily when pulling on both sides. also, the sealed area does not look quite sealed.

can someone comment on whether this structure looks normal to you? my regular sealer make a much cleaner sealing line.

thanks a lot!

 

 

sealer.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 months later...

So I got my Anova, barely used it, as I still don't have a vacuum sealer. I do NOT have the budget for a chamber sealer, so I was thinking, for wet items, do the ziplock thing first, seal, then vacuum seal the ziplock in a foodsaver/etc bag?  Should make the poor-handling of wet foods with the Foodsavers a non-issue, right?

Edited by Hassouni (log)
Link to post
Share on other sites

this is an interesting idea.

 

TestKitchen a while ago reviewed 'zip-like bags'

 

they had a free video on how they did their testing on their " Show Me the Money, Right Now !!! " web site

 

it was hilarious

 

Id use freezer-grade zips which one of theirs was the winner.  thicker.

 

sounds good

 

let us know  ( many pics nice ) how this works out.

 

PS : if you use the water immersion method, make sure that Bag is completely dry before you

 

FoodSaver it.

Edited by rotuts (log)
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Similar Content

    • By eG Forums Host
      Modernist Cuisine at the eGullet Forums
      Here at eG Forums, we have what is probably the broadest collection of information on modernist cooking anywhere. We've discussed sous vide, the general chemistry of culinary modernism, practical applications with colloids and starches, and much, much more. A lot of this discussion is contained in our topics about the books Modernist Cuisine and Modernist Cuisine at Home (we have topics on both the books and on cooking with the recipes they present), but we've been modern since before modern was cool -- click on the 'Recent discussions tagged "Modernist"' link at the bottom of this page for a small sampling of what we've been up to. And feel free to use the Search tool at the top of the page to look for specific terms or people.

      Modernist Cuisine: The Art and Science of Cooking by Nathan Myhrvold with Chris Young and Maxime Bilet



      Support eG, buy the book at Amazon.com
      About the original book (Part 1, Part 2, Part 3)
      Cooking the recipes from the book (Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4)
      A Q&A with the Modernist Cuisine team

      Modernist Cuisine at Home by Nathan Myhrvold with Maxime Bilet



      Support eG, buy the book at Amazon.com
      About the book
      Cooking the recipes from the book (Part 1, Part 2)

      Other Modernist-related topics:
      Recent discussions tagged "Modernist"
      Sous Vide discussion index
    • By Porthos
      I picked up enough boneless short ribs to make 3 meals for my Sweetie and me. One meal will be pan-braised tonight. One has been vacuum-sealed and is in the freezer. My question is about seasoning, sealing, freezing, then defrosting and cooking at a later date. I'd like to season and seal the 3rd meal's worth. Can I use a dry rub on the meat, then seal, freeze, and cook at a later date? Does anyone else do this?
    • By newchef
      So I've now found myself at the water's edge of Modernist Cuisine.  Specifically, using sodium citrate for emulsifying all kinds of cheeses.  What I'm after is making an emulsified Parmesan sauce as well as another emulsified cheese sauce (most likely using Cheddar or Colby) that I can freeze and use later.  I'm a single guy and am no stranger of tweaking recipes for freezing but I haven't done it for modernist stuff yet.  I'd love to make a big batch of cheese sauce, freeze it into ice cubes for up to 3 months or so, and then take a few cubes out to thaw on a weeknight and toss with pasta, drizzle over veggies, etc.
       
      I looked at the modernist cuisine FAQ and saw this specific post about the cheese sauce that is "probably" freeze-able because it uses something called carageenan.  Has anyone been able to freeze sauce and keep it frozen for, say, a few months?  And not have to use carageenan?
       
      Thanks!
    • By WackGet
      Recently I picked up a few different types of emulsifiers in bulk powder form when I saw them in passing at a catering wholesaler.
       
      Having never used powdered emulsifiers before in cooking or baking, I figured I'd find pretty comprehensive instructions for their use on the web - but I can't.
       
      I'm not a stranger to food science but nor am I a chemist. I understand that emulsifiers are at least sometimes prepared by pre-mixing them into a (heated?) liquid or fat and then using the resulting solution in the actual recipe, which may explain why a lot of commercial emulsifier mixtures are packages as tubes of gel or paste. I've also checked several industry-level textbooks about emulsifiers and while they are fantastic for in-depth explanations of the chemistry behind each emulsifier, they do not (as you might imagine) provide guidance on how a lowly baker or cook would actually use a powdered form.
       
      So does anyone know how to prepare and use a dry powdered form of any of the following in a real recipe?
       
      Specifically I am most interested in enhancing baked goods and adding stability to sauces, but would also like to know how to use them for other processes such as sausage-making too.
      E471 Mono- and diglycerides of fatty acids E481 Sodium stearoyl lactylate E482 Calcium stearoyl lactylate E472e DATEM (diacetyl tartaric acid ester of mono- and diglycerides)
        Thanks.
    • By mjbarnard
      I cooked two turkey breasts sous vide. This year had access to the Meater+ thermometer probe which I managed to vacuum seal in the bag without difficulty (it is small). Since it works wirelessly I was able to monitor and it records the internal temperatures at the thickest part of the breast.
      I thought the results were interesting. I cooked at 60C for 8 hours. I have always used https://www.chefsteps.com/activities/a-better-way-to-turkey-cook-that-bird-sous-vide-for-the-best-feast-ever which gives long cooking times at lower temperature. I have found that as according to this page https://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2014/11/sous-vide-turkey-breast-crispy-skin-recipe-thanksgiving.html that 55C gives turkey which is just a little too pink for most tastes. Over the last few years have increased the temperature up to 59/60 and I find it perfect - very moist and tender, but pale not pink.
      See attached images. I changed my mind a couple of times and started at 58 then 60 then 59 again, so ignore the slight variations. The thing I found interesting was that the thickest part (of a large breast) reached 55C in around 1 hour 40 mins and target of 59 in 2 hours 30 mins. Now I appreciate that sous vide is a combination of temperature and time or duration, but the data make me think that around 4 hours would be sufficient, as per the seriouseats table. I have previously used the chefsteps 55-58 for their much longer advised times, up to 12 hours and the meat is still quite pink at the end, so I dont believe 55 for 12 hours would effectively be the same.
      From now on I will watching the internal temperatures with interest. This has always been the (relative) unkown for sous vide amateurs. 


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...