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Stephen McGlynn

J.P. Wybauw – "Fine Chocolates 2" (Ganache)

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I recently purchased this book but I'm unsure regarding the use of "glucose"... does anyone know if this refers to liquid glucose (corn syrup) or powdered glucose?

Any advice would be grateful.

Thanks,

Stephen

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I believe when he says just "glucose" he means the syrup and "d-glucose" it's the powder.

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Thank you, it's just that I've been told that he calls it corn-syrup in Fine Chocolates 1... Anyway, thanks again, can proceed with the reciepe now!!

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Chef Wybauw is definitely speaking about glucose syrup. If you don't have glucose, you should be able to substitute light corn syrup without much difference. The only down side to corn syrup is that it often has a light vanilla flavor already added.

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Does anyone know if when he calls for "raspberry puree" he is looking for fresh-raspberry-strength, or reduced by some factor?

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Does anyone know if when he calls for "raspberry puree" he is looking for fresh-raspberry-strength, or reduced by some factor?

I'd say frozen raspberry puree strength ie - not reduced.

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Awesome, that's what I've got. I'm making the raspberry saffron bonbons next time it is cool enough to deal with chocolates around here. Maybe tomorrow... (fingers crossed)

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Here is a link to his bio on the French Pastry School site. Ironically, the photo displayed on that page is from the class I took with him there. There is also a link to his personal web site here (which wasn't responding when I checked it as I write this).

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So this afternoon I made the Raspberry ganache with saffron (p. 135), and it is phenomenal. I used it to fill dark chocolate bonbons, and the way the raspberry strikes the first note followed by the haunting taste of saffron on the finish is just great.

I played around with a new (to me) decorating technique, with mixed results. I started by brushing in luster dust, then brushing cocoa butter over that to hold it in place. Next up was a dab of white chocolate, them molded as usual with dark chocolate. Unfortunately, the white chocolate didn't always stick reliable to the cocoa butter, so in some places it cracked off when unmolding. What did I do wrong?

Raspberry saffron bonbons.jpg

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Chris - when I use luster dust, I just brush it into the mould and then cast the chocolate shell in one go. No painting on the cocoa butter and no dabbing chocolate as a pre-shell coat. Seems to work for me but others may have different suggestions.

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Unfortunately, the white chocolate didn't always stick reliable to the cocoa butter, so in some places it cracked off when unmolding. What did I do wrong?

I had something similar happen to me once. I was brushing luster dust into a mold, then the cocoa butter, then white chocolate, then molding. I was using lime green, yellows, and white colors for decorating a Jagermeister/Lime/WC ganache. When I unmolded, the white would peel off in places, very similar sounding to what you described. I tried several different things, and in the end, I ended up very quickly running a hair dryer over the mold after applying the luster dust and cocoa butter. I did this just before applying the white. I was thinking maybe there was just a build-up of layers that was causing a failure of each to adhere. Dont know if thats proper thinking, but the hair dryer worked, and I still use the technique today.

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Today I made the "Africa" ganache (p. 88), flavored with cinnamon, star anise, and ginger. Unfortunately I think the flavors were overall too subtle, they barely come through in the ganache alone, and are all but indiscernible in the finished bonbons.

So, what's next?

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Today I made the "Africa" ganache (p. 88), flavored with cinnamon, star anise, and ginger. Unfortunately I think the flavors were overall too subtle, they barely come through in the ganache alone, and are all but indiscernible in the finished bonbons.

So, what's next?

I must confess to finding a lot of his ganaches 'underflavoured' for my taste.

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I really loved the raspberry saffron one. I think I may try the "Wine Cream" next.

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How does this book compare to his 2007 Fine Chocolates: Great Experience book?

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It has way more ganache recipes in it: the 2007 book was sort of all over the place in what it covered. This one is just ganache. I almost never use the first volume anymore.

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