• Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

  • product-image-quickten.png.a40203b506711f7664fc62024e54a584.pngDid you know that these all-volunteer forums are operated by the 501(c)3 not-for-profit Society for Culinary Arts & Letters? This holiday season, consider a tax-deductible Quick Ten Bucks to support the eG Forums and help us remain completely advertising-free. Thanks to all those who have donated so far!

Stephen McGlynn

J.P. Wybauw – "Fine Chocolates 2" (Ganache)

16 posts in this topic

I recently purchased this book but I'm unsure regarding the use of "glucose"... does anyone know if this refers to liquid glucose (corn syrup) or powdered glucose?

Any advice would be grateful.

Thanks,

Stephen

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe when he says just "glucose" he means the syrup and "d-glucose" it's the powder.


Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you, it's just that I've been told that he calls it corn-syrup in Fine Chocolates 1... Anyway, thanks again, can proceed with the reciepe now!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chef Wybauw is definitely speaking about glucose syrup. If you don't have glucose, you should be able to substitute light corn syrup without much difference. The only down side to corn syrup is that it often has a light vanilla flavor already added.


Steve Lebowitz

Doer of All Things

Steven Howard Confections

Slicing a warm slab of bacon is a lot like giving a ferret a shave. No matter how careful you are, somebody's going to get hurt - Alton Brown, "Good Eats"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Does anyone know if when he calls for "raspberry puree" he is looking for fresh-raspberry-strength, or reduced by some factor?


Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Awesome, that's what I've got. I'm making the raspberry saffron bonbons next time it is cool enough to deal with chocolates around here. Maybe tomorrow... (fingers crossed)


Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is a link to his bio on the French Pastry School site. Ironically, the photo displayed on that page is from the class I took with him there. There is also a link to his personal web site here (which wasn't responding when I checked it as I write this).


Steve Lebowitz

Doer of All Things

Steven Howard Confections

Slicing a warm slab of bacon is a lot like giving a ferret a shave. No matter how careful you are, somebody's going to get hurt - Alton Brown, "Good Eats"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So this afternoon I made the Raspberry ganache with saffron (p. 135), and it is phenomenal. I used it to fill dark chocolate bonbons, and the way the raspberry strikes the first note followed by the haunting taste of saffron on the finish is just great.

I played around with a new (to me) decorating technique, with mixed results. I started by brushing in luster dust, then brushing cocoa butter over that to hold it in place. Next up was a dab of white chocolate, them molded as usual with dark chocolate. Unfortunately, the white chocolate didn't always stick reliable to the cocoa butter, so in some places it cracked off when unmolding. What did I do wrong?

Raspberry saffron bonbons.jpg


Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chris - when I use luster dust, I just brush it into the mould and then cast the chocolate shell in one go. No painting on the cocoa butter and no dabbing chocolate as a pre-shell coat. Seems to work for me but others may have different suggestions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Unfortunately, the white chocolate didn't always stick reliable to the cocoa butter, so in some places it cracked off when unmolding. What did I do wrong?

I had something similar happen to me once. I was brushing luster dust into a mold, then the cocoa butter, then white chocolate, then molding. I was using lime green, yellows, and white colors for decorating a Jagermeister/Lime/WC ganache. When I unmolded, the white would peel off in places, very similar sounding to what you described. I tried several different things, and in the end, I ended up very quickly running a hair dryer over the mold after applying the luster dust and cocoa butter. I did this just before applying the white. I was thinking maybe there was just a build-up of layers that was causing a failure of each to adhere. Dont know if thats proper thinking, but the hair dryer worked, and I still use the technique today.


"It only hurts if it bites you" - Steve Irwin

"Whats another word for Thesaurus?" - Me

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Today I made the "Africa" ganache (p. 88), flavored with cinnamon, star anise, and ginger. Unfortunately I think the flavors were overall too subtle, they barely come through in the ganache alone, and are all but indiscernible in the finished bonbons.

So, what's next?


Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Today I made the "Africa" ganache (p. 88), flavored with cinnamon, star anise, and ginger. Unfortunately I think the flavors were overall too subtle, they barely come through in the ganache alone, and are all but indiscernible in the finished bonbons.

So, what's next?

I must confess to finding a lot of his ganaches 'underflavoured' for my taste.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I really loved the raspberry saffron one. I think I may try the "Wine Cream" next.


Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How does this book compare to his 2007 Fine Chocolates: Great Experience book?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It has way more ganache recipes in it: the 2007 book was sort of all over the place in what it covered. This one is just ganache. I almost never use the first volume anymore.


Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By Jim D.
      Host's note: this topic was split from Pâte de Fruits (Fruit Paste/Fruit Jellies) (Part 2)
       
       
      I took a look. Rather manipulative site: you have no idea what your selection will cost until you have finished choosing chocolates. And the descriptions are a masterpiece of marketing:  dulce de leche is "succulent homemade milk jam"--a rather grand description of cooked sweetened condensed milk. Really! But you are so right, they look amazing.
    • By Choky
      At least in Europe comercial chocolate tablets are getting thinner. Usually 6mm thick and of course bigger in area.
       
      But I don't manage to find that kind of molds at manufacturer's sites (80 or 100g). Or at least choice is very limited.
       
      Why? Maybe too thin for manual unmolding? Or they just use bigger molds and fill partially? 
       
      Thanks!
    • By Damnfine
      I have a box of truffle shells that were not stored properly and have bloomed. If I fill and dip them in tempered chocolate, will the newly dipped chocolate bloom due to the layer underneath it, or will the outer layer seal the under layer and keep them looking nice?
    • By adey73
      does anyone recognise this grate/grid that Antonio Bachour is using in this picture.....or what the correct name for this bit of kit is....?
       
      I like the height and I want one...
       
       
    • By jedovaty
      Good morning!
       
      Long story short: I am doing a spin off the coconut/chocolate/almond candy (almond joy), and trying to create a specific shape out of the almond.  My hands are cramped after a couple dozen failed attempts whittling roasted almonds, so now I'd like to try a different approach, and instead, create some kind of sub-candy or cookie with roasted almonds that I can put into a mold or use a mini cookie cutter.  I'm fairly new to sweets, my knowledge in this area is pretty slim.  Some ideas so far, I don't like any, but it might help turn some gears:
      1. dusting almond over a stencil, but that's not enough almond nor crunchy enough
      2. almond brittle, but that's too hard and sweet, I'd like it more of a soft crunch, and bringing the almond flavor forward
      3. meringue with almonds (sort of macaron-ish), however, weather has been humid and raining here, and I'm ending up with a gooey mess instead of that soft crunch
       
      In addition to having almond-forward taste and soft crunch texture, it'd be fun to explore something modernish - I have a accumulated a few tools and ingredients not customarily found in homes.
       
      There are dietary considerations I will have to account for, however, no need to worry about that now, I am just looking for ideas and a place to take it from there
       
      Thank you for your time in reading!
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.