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Darienne

Mexican sweets

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I searched the entire Mexican cooking and baking forums and could find nothing to cover the dessert aspect of Mexican cooking. So here goes...

Currently I am fascinated by the desserts aspect of Mexican cooking. On a whim I purchased Fany Gerson. My Sweet Mexico and although I don't think I'm going to do a "Chris Hennes" through the book, I do intend to try a lot of the desserts this year.

To date I have made Empanadas de jitomate. I was so taken by the idea of tomato jam. And this was the third time in 50 years that I had made pastry, two of the times being in the last month. They were delicious.

Jitomato Empanadas.JPG

Next I have made the familiar Bizcochitos from a recipe given to me by a friend. They turned out very well. Not a difficult or complicated recipe.

Bizcochitos.JPG

My next dessert will go back to the Gerson book: Pemoles/Coffee-Flavored Corn Cookies. They sound like nothing I have ever eaten: cookies made with Masa and flavored with brewed coffee. And I still am intending to make a Capirotada but will wait until the Lenten season and make a traditional Lenten variety.

Anyone else making any Mexican desserts of any kind?

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I got My Sweet Mexico back in October and have been cooking pretty successfully from it. The first thing I, too, made were the Empanadas de Jitomate :smile: They are very good and ridiculously easy to make. The dough is so forgiving and the jam a snap. I've actually made them several times and taken them to parties where not only are they a novelty, they also disappear pretty quickly.

I've also made the Huachiboles and the Pan de Muerto, both of which were very good. I made another recipe that didn't turn out so well, but I think it was an equipment error on my part. I was going to work my way through some of the candies and cookies duruing the holidays but didn't quite get there. You're right, there isn't much on Mexican desserts other than flan, churros, bunelos, this book certainly presents a much wider spectrum.

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Great to find a fellow Mexican dessert maker.

I went straight to the recipe for Huachibolas and they sound wonderful. Too bad there isn't a photo of them in the book. Too bad there isn't a photo of them on Google either or in any of the many websites I went to. Fortunately I did find a picture on Google of the Pemoles which I want to make, because Gerson's description left me boggled and there weren't any English language websites available.

Now I admit I am a novice cook and baker, but I don't find Gerson's description of how to close the Huachibolas all that clear. Actually, I find it quite unclear. But then I have found so far that her recipes are very unclear in certain spots. As I recall...although I can't find it again...in an earlier thread in this forum someone did say that this book was not for the beginners.

However, I am keen and persistent and I shall make it a goal to try as many of her recipes as I can this year. How's that for a New Year's resolution?

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Working with limones rellenos de cocada, jamoncillos, camotes, a nd tortitas de Sta Clara ... I am to the point that I can not only smell sugar, I can smell the type ... that's scary

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Working with limones rellenos de cocada, jamoncillos, camotes, a nd tortitas de Sta Clara ... I am to the point that I can not only smell sugar, I can smell the type ... that's scary

There are recipes for the first three desserts in My Sweet Mexico, but not even a listing for the tortitas de Sta Clara. I found it on Google, but with two differing definition: one is a shortbread type cookie, the other a pumpkin.

Please tell me which is correct and where you found your recipe. Thanks. :smile:

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Darienne, your empanadas look perfect.

The Huachibolas should look like a little beggar's purse when finished, except there is no need to tie the corners together because the dough should stick together when pinched and twisted.

If your dough is a bit too dry, brush the corners with water and they will stick together easily.

In different areas of Mexico the empanada fillings can vary widely. I went to Christmas dinner at the home of friends who are originally from Mexico. Lots of people and many contributed to the meal. There were several varieties of Empanadas dolce - with pumpkin, with mincemeat, also pineapple, other fruits and some filled with something like thick cream or sweet cheese flavored with spices. It's one of the fresh cheeses that is very similar to "farmers" or "hoop" cheese - like a dry cottage cheese. There was also one type filled with finely chopped nuts and caramel that may have been dulce de leche, but the lady who brought them doesn't speak a lot of English and my Spanish is rudimentary, at best.


Edited by andiesenji (log)

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Thanks Andie, and Sharon and Calypso, for all the information.

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Great to find a fellow Mexican dessert maker.

I went straight to the recipe for Huachibolas and they sound wonderful. Too bad there isn't a photo of them in the book. Too bad there isn't a photo of them on Google either or in any of the many websites I went to. Fortunately I did find a picture on Google of the Pemoles which I want to make, because Gerson's description left me boggled and there weren't any English language websites available.

Now I admit I am a novice cook and baker, but I don't find Gerson's description of how to close the Huachibolas all that clear. Actually, I find it quite unclear. But then I have found so far that her recipes are very unclear in certain spots. As I recall...although I can't find it again...in an earlier thread in this forum someone did say that this book was not for the beginners.

However, I am keen and persistent and I shall make it a goal to try as many of her recipes as I can this year. How's that for a New Year's resolution?

I would agree, her instructions sometimes leave something to be desired. I'm a pretty good baker, but I've had some difficulty figuring out what she intended. I learned after my first recipe I needed to read each one pretty thoroughly before starting out on it. For example, some of her recipes call for tepid/lukewarm liquid for proofing yeast, others don't. After having made a couple of them, you do need to use tepid/lukewarm liquid. I should have trusted my instincts and used the warm liquid on the one recipe I tried that didn't call for it. The lack of clarity is a little frustrating, but so far hasn't been a big deterrent.

The Huachiboles are another example of the lack of instruction clarity. Mine looked pretty much like large dinner rolls. I gather the corners up and pressed them together, then flipped the packet over and made it into a ball. I'm not entirely sure this is correct, but it's how I interpretted her directions :biggrin:

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The bottom parts of the huachibolas are shaped like a ball but with little "ears" sticking up. At least that is the way a local Mexican bakery makes them and the way I have seen them made.

They look something like these dumplings in the top left pictures

Does that help?

Yes, it does help. I like this method of shaping and forming better than the one I tried. This dough is a pleasure to work with and well suited to your method. In addition I think it will yield a nicer, more interesting final product.

Thanks for the suggestion, I'm going to try it soon.

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Made my first batch of Cocada tonight. DH loved it. Kept on sneaking pieces. Next time photos.

I realize that there are a hundred different recipes for this confection. Anyone have a favorite?

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So is my Sweet Mexico a must buy. Kalypso... do you have the Larousse Mexico book (by D'Angeli & Gironella).. do you feel My Sweet Mexico has things that go above & beyond it?

Gracias Muchacha

P.S. are you in the Yucatan now? I am sure you have read about Marquesotas the street food dessert par excellence of Merida (kind of like a cross between Canoli & Rolled Crepe stuffed with aged cheese & Cajeta). If I remember correctly they set up on the main plaza right across from the iconic ice cream shop.

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So is my Sweet Mexico a must buy. Kalypso... do you have the Larousse Mexico book (by D'Angeli & Gironella).. do you feel My Sweet Mexico has things that go above & beyond it?

Gracias Muchacha

P.S. are you in the Yucatan now? I am sure you have read about Marquesotas the street food dessert par excellence of Merida (kind of like a cross between Canoli & Rolled Crepe stuffed with aged cheese & Cajeta). If I remember correctly they set up on the main plaza right across from the iconic ice cream shop.

Yes, I have Larousse Mexico book. I think they're different enough to have both. I'll look at them side-by-side this week so I can give you a better idea of how they're different

Just returned from the Yucatan and, yes, I had Marqesitos. Loved them. They've added Nutella to the options. It makes a great sweet snack for walking around. It's certainly hard to resist buying when a cart is in the area, they smell so good :rolleyes:

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From Fany Gerson's My Sweet Mexico, Helado de Pasitas con Tequila / Tequila-Raisin Ice Cream, p.184.

Eight hours later and it's still sitting in a very cold freezer (-20 C or 4 below F). And it's still quite soft. A regular ice cream would be hard as a rock. It's our dog food freezer and it's too cold for ice cream.

The ice cream is delicious and it's very soft and I am not surprised. The recipe which makes 1 quart calls for 3/4 cup of Tequila. Could this much booze possibly freeze in an ice cream? Did I say that it was delicious???? :raz:

Has anyone else tried it?

(Next weekend I am making 'Mexican' for some friends who are very excited at the prospect. Remember that we live in the far frozen north in a very provincial region. I've made the above ice cream for the over 21 crowd and am going to make Helado de Cajeta / Cajeta Ice Cream for those under.)

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More on Fany Gerson and Mexican ice creams:

Both the Helado de Cajeta and Helado de Pasitas con Tequila were big hits at our last Mexican food with guests. The Tequila ice cream simply took longer to harden. I am still stunned at how 3/4 of a cup of Tequila hardened into ice cream. Oh, I did somewhat change the recipe in that I didn't heat the Tequila at all in the making.

Next ice cream projects: (with English in case there is anyone on this topic with less Spanish than I)

1. Helado de Elote (corn)

2. Helado de Aguacate (avocado)

3. Helado de Queso (queso fresco / fresh cheese)

Plus I am thinking about making Raspado de Margarita / Margarita Ice A frozen slushy Margarita. In a bowl. With a spoon. (for you especially Jaymes)

Currently I am on the path of a Tomatillo and Lime Jam from Pati's Mexican Table.

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Not heating the Tequila is probably why you got that lovely soft result. Heating will remove a great deal of the spirit of the alcohol, leaving behind only the flavoured water - which, naturally, will freeze better than the full-spirited version.

Let me know what you think of Helado de Aguacate - personally, it's one of my favourite flavours.

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Not heating the Tequila was not an accident. If I was going to put all that Tequila into an ice cream, I was going to go for the full effect. And as noted, it did harden sufficiently.

I should probably confess that I make almost all my ice creams using a cooked cornstarch base ever since I first learned of it. Fewer calories in the end. And pretty much the same mouthfeel without the eggy taste.

Here's an interesting note in Gerson's recipe for Helado de Elote: "Traditionally this ice cream if not made with a custard base, but I believe that it enhances the creaminess of the corn."

Gerson uses 8 egg yolks for 5 cups of ice cream. I googled the ice cream but could not find one made without eggs. Any thoughts?

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More on Fany Gerson and Mexican ice creams:

Both the Helado de Cajeta and Helado de Pasitas con Tequila were big hits at our last Mexican food with guests. The Tequila ice cream simply took longer to harden. I am still stunned at how 3/4 of a cup of Tequila hardened into ice cream. Oh, I did somewhat change the recipe in that I didn't heat the Tequila at all in the making.

Next ice cream projects: (with English in case there is anyone on this topic with less Spanish than I)

1. Helado de Elote (corn)

2. Helado de Aguacate (avocado)

3. Helado de Queso (queso fresco / fresh cheese)

Plus I am thinking about making Raspado de Margarita / Margarita Ice A frozen slushy Margarita. In a bowl. With a spoon. (for you especially Jaymes)

Currently I am on the path of a Tomatillo and Lime Jam from Pati's Mexican Table.

Hola.. with regards to Avocado ice cream... this has traditionally been made with Criollo variety instead of Hass (Criollo is an ancestor of the Hass avocado).. the Criollos often have an anisey aroma just like their leaves... the last time I made Avocado ice cream (surprisingly a big hit with the office workers in Hawaii).. I added anise seed to good results.

Also, I should note that roasted garlic ice cream is relatively popular throughout Central Mexico... Mexican ice cream philosophy is traditionally to not mix a lot of different flavors within an ice cream... but instead to scoop various mono-flavored ice creams in the same cup... it is perfectly "normally" to get a scoop of Avocado, a scoop of Garlic & a scoop of Elote in a single cup.. and then mix to your hearts desire... one of my "inventions" is to make an Avocado / Roasted Garlic / Avocado Leaf base then stir in Tomato Jam & Jalapeno Jelly prior to setting... Guacamole Ice Cream... it makes a nice appetizer or palette cleanser.

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Hola.. with regards to Avocado ice cream... this has traditionally been made with Criollo variety instead of Hass (Criollo is an ancestor of the Hass avocado).. the Criollos often have an anisey aroma just like their leaves... the last time I made Avocado ice cream (surprisingly a big hit with the office workers in Hawaii).. I added anise seed to good results.

Also, I should note that roasted garlic ice cream is relatively popular throughout Central Mexico... Mexican ice cream philosophy is traditionally to not mix a lot of different flavors within an ice cream... but instead to scoop various mono-flavored ice creams in the same cup... it is perfectly "normally" to get a scoop of Avocado, a scoop of Garlic & a scoop of Elote in a single cup.. and then mix to your hearts desire... one of my "inventions" is to make an Avocado / Roasted Garlic / Avocado Leaf base then stir in Tomato Jam & Jalapeno Jelly prior to setting... Guacamole Ice Cream... it makes a nice appetizer or palette cleanser.

Never seen a Criollo avocado up in Canada. Never even heard of them...which is not surprising.

As for your "Avocado / Roasted Garlic / Avocado Leaf base then stir in Tomato Jam & Jalapeno Jelly prior to setting... Guacamole Ice Cream"...I am overwhelmed!!!!

I do have some tomato jam on hand from my last batch. :smile:

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Criollo avocados are really delicious, some of them have a skin so thin you can eat the whole thing save the pit.

I make a Bloody Maria (same thing as a bloody mary, only with Tequila instead of Vodka)granita that I then turn into an appetizer using seafood (mostly shrimp), avocado and pico de gallo. Assembled in a margarita glass or oversized martini glass it makes a nice presentation.

As for ice creams...zarza y coco in the same cup. That would be blackberry and coconut, my favorite combination

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Criollo avocados are really delicious, some of them have a skin so thin you can eat the whole thing save the pit.

I make a Bloody Maria (same thing as a bloody mary, only with Tequila instead of Vodka)granita that I then turn into an appetizer using seafood (mostly shrimp), avocado and pico de gallo. Assembled in a margarita glass or oversized martini glass it makes a nice presentation.

As for ice creams...zarza y coco in the same cup. That would be blackberry and coconut, my favorite combination

Sounds good.. unnatural combination of differing ecosystems.. but it sure sounds delicious.

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Strawberry ice cream with guajillo chile Homesick Texan

This sounds not too bad and I have some blackberries right now with which I could make it...or not. Am saving it for raspberries I guess and will stick to making the Avocado first.

Our choices and seasons for fruits up here and the taste thereof, just don't begin to equal what you lucky stiffs can get down south. :sad:

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As for ice creams...zarza y coco in the same cup. That would be blackberry and coconut, my favorite combination

I would be most grateful for either your blackberry and coconut ice cream recipe or at least some direction as to how much of each you use to how much cream, etc. And whether the coconut is fresh or dried or unsweetened. Thank you.

And whether you are using coconut cream or coconut milk also... I did find one recipe but it was Thai.


Edited by Darienne (log)

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