Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

rebgold

Meltaways

Recommended Posts

23 minutes ago, RobertM said:

It would be far more expensive, but, wouldn’t coca butter work as well?  

 

No, if the meltaways are chocolate-based, they need a different fat to soften the cocoa butter that's already in there.  Coconut oil, nut oils, clarified butter, etc, will all have a softening effect, making the candy melt in the mouth faster.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

I suspect ghee or butter oil would work reasonably well - make a tiny test batch.

 

Mixed up a 100 gram batch and ghee does work nicely from a texture standpoint. I used the EZTemper silk and meant to add about 2% or so, but my scale has trouble with such tiny measurements so I likely went over. The sun butter itself is a bit grainy compared to the Jif I usually use in the PB version, so that comes through a bit - but not offensively so. The flavor seemed a bit flat; I added a bit of salt and that improved things some. No one is going to mistake them for the original, but they’re not going to necessitate an EpiPen or a trip to the ER for my sweet little Violet, so I’d consider them a success.

 

 

 

 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, patris said:

 

Mixed up a 100 gram batch and ghee does work nicely from a texture standpoint. I used the EZTemper silk and meant to add about 2% or so, but my scale has trouble with such tiny measurements so I likely went over. The sun butter itself is a bit grainy compared to the Jif I usually use in the PB version, so that comes through a bit - but not offensively so. The flavor seemed a bit flat; I added a bit of salt and that improved things some. No one is going to mistake them for the original, but they’re not going to necessitate an EpiPen or a trip to the ER for my sweet little Violet, so I’d consider them a success.

 

 

 

 

It's always a good day when you don't end up in the ER!

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are we using regular off-the-shelf whatever's at the grocery store coconut oil for meltaways or tracking down the deodorized stuff? I've wanted to try them for a long time but wasn't sure if the stuff at the store was going to make them taste like coconut mint or coconut peanut butter meltaways.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Tri2Cook said:

Are we using regular off-the-shelf whatever's at the grocery store coconut oil for meltaways or tracking down the deodorized stuff? I've wanted to try them for a long time but wasn't sure if the stuff at the store was going to make them taste like coconut mint or coconut peanut butter meltaways.

Somewhat deodorized is best.

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Kerry Beal said:

Somewhat deodorized is best.

 

 


I suspected that would be the case but I've never used any type of coconut oil for anything so I wasn't sure how strong the regular stuff is. I'll check the store again to be sure because stuff changes there all the time and I haven't looked recently but this will probably have to wait until my next amazon order.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Tri2Cook said:


I suspected that would be the case but I've never used any type of coconut oil for anything so I wasn't sure how strong the regular stuff is. I'll check the store again to be sure because stuff changes there all the time and I haven't looked recently but this will probably have to wait until my next amazon order.

It really does seem to differ between brands. I have a big block of hydrogenated deodorized oil that I got from Bunge a while back - totally neutral flavor.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Kerry Beal said:

It really does seem to differ between brands. I have a big block of hydrogenated deodorized oil that I got from Bunge a while back - totally neutral flavor.


They sell one on amazon that's no more expensive than the regular stuff at the local store with free shipping so it should be easy to get. It wasn't something I planned to have done before Christmas anyway but I'll check at the store again first just to make sure I don't order it for no reason. Do these wind up being similar to icy squares in texture?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Tri2Cook said:


They sell one on amazon that's no more expensive than the regular stuff at the local store with free shipping so it should be easy to get. It wasn't something I planned to have done before Christmas anyway but I'll check at the store again first just to make sure I don't order it for no reason. Do these wind up being similar to icy squares in texture?

Yup - icy squares are meltaways.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Tri2Cook said:

Are we using regular off-the-shelf whatever's at the grocery store coconut oil for meltaways or tracking down the deodorized stuff? I've wanted to try them for a long time but wasn't sure if the stuff at the store was going to make them taste like coconut mint or coconut peanut butter meltaways.

I bought a big bucket of coconut oil from Costco. It was deodorized and worked perfectly for me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, dhardy123 said:

I bought a big bucket of coconut oil from Costco. It was deodorized and worked perfectly for me.

Hmmm.  The coconut oil I saw at Costco was unrefined.  I need to look again I guess.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Bentley said:

Hmmm.  The coconut oil I saw at Costco was unrefined.  I need to look again I guess.

Might be the Canadian Costco vs the US (or even regional within Canada or the US).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks everybody. I don't need a large amount, at least not for now, I just needed to verify that I should use the deodorized stuff. The ~400 gram jars I can order from amazon will be plenty to get started with if there's none at the local store.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Tri2Cook said:

Thanks everybody. I don't need a large amount, at least not for now, I just needed to verify that I should use the deodorized stuff. The ~400 gram jars I can order from amazon will be plenty to get started with if there's none at the local store.

 

Chiming in late, but definitely can verify that the refined/deodorized stuff is what you want. Wasted a whole batch of peanut butters with unrefined stuff from Trader Joe’s because I didn’t taste or smell it first. Not a terrible flavor, but not right either.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How difficult are these to handle if you don't coat them in powdered sugar? With the commercial versions, you have to go from wrapper to mouth without much hesitation or you get messy fingers but it's doable. Is it the same with these or do they really need that coating? I'd like to pipe it in shells but I have a feeling that would spoil the meltaway effect.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, Tri2Cook said:

How difficult are these to handle if you don't coat them in powdered sugar? With the commercial versions, you have to go from wrapper to mouth without much hesitation or you get messy fingers but it's doable. Is it the same with these or do they really need that coating? I'd like to pipe it in shells but I have a feeling that would spoil the meltaway effect.

They do tend to melt when they get touched - so I do either the powdered sugar or I dip them. Last batch I made I actually made some bar molds and just piped the meltaway into it after I cooled to around 28º C and added 1% EZtemper silk. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
52 minutes ago, Tri2Cook said:

How difficult are these to handle if you don't coat them in powdered sugar? With the commercial versions, you have to go from wrapper to mouth without much hesitation or you get messy fingers but it's doable. Is it the same with these or do they really need that coating? I'd like to pipe it in shells but I have a feeling that would spoil the meltaway effect.

I piped passionfruit meltaways into shelled molds at our last eGullet chocolate workshop in Vegas. Really like them -- even though there is a chocolate shell around the filling. I recommend giving it a try when you have the time. Important note -- the only way that I have successfully piped meltaways is to use the EZtemper silk. There may be another way but if you have the silk, it makes the process super easy.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

They do tend to melt when they get touched - so I do either the powdered sugar or I dip them. Last batch I made I actually made some bar molds and just piped the meltaway into it after I cooled to around 28º C and added 1% EZtemper silk. 

 

8 hours ago, curls said:

I piped passionfruit meltaways into shelled molds at our last eGullet chocolate workshop in Vegas. Really like them -- even though there is a chocolate shell around the filling. I recommend giving it a try when you have the time. Important note -- the only way that I have successfully piped meltaways is to use the EZtemper silk. There may be another way but if you have the silk, it makes the process super easy.


Thanks! I was going to use the EZtemper silk whether I shell them or not so I'll just shoot some of it in a couple shells before I frame the rest and see how I like the result. I mainly just asked in case it was an already known bad idea but since that's not the case... a testing we will go. As soon as I get my coconut oil, that is.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Tri2Cook said:

 


Thanks! I was going to use the EZtemper silk whether I shell them or not so I'll just shoot some of it in a couple shells before I frame the rest and see how I like the result. I mainly just asked in case it was an already known bad idea but since that's not the case... a testing we will go. As soon as I get my coconut oil, that is.

Use the silk for the framed ones too

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

Use the silk for the framed ones too


Yep, that's the plan. I remembered you posting about using it for the meltaways and being really happy with the result so I was already going to do that when I decided to ask about using meltaway as a filling.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have done both dipped and icing sugar coated meltaways. When dipped it really takes away the meltaway feeling as you have a crunchy outer shell of chocolate.

I have also used frames but now use a silicon square insert to make them. No leaks and I only need to cut in 1 direction.

IMG_0049.JPG

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
On ‎2017‎-‎12‎-‎28 at 7:51 PM, dhardy123 said:

I have done both dipped and icing sugar coated meltaways. When dipped it really takes away the meltaway feeling as you have a crunchy outer shell of chocolate.

I have also used frames but now use a silicon square insert to make them. No leaks and I only need to cut in 1 direction.

 


I wanted to mold it in silicone heart-shaped molds but the smallest one I found has hearts that are 1 1/2" x 1 1/2" x 3/4" thick. I can adjust the thickness by how full I fill them but 1 1/2" x 1 1/2" is too big for a one-bite piece so I probably won't do it in that shape. But just for general knowledge, does it pop out of silicone molds without too much trouble?

Edit: Found some that are 3/4" x 3/4". That should work.


Edited by Tri2Cook (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Tri2Cook said:


I wanted to mold it in silicone heart-shaped molds but the smallest one I found has hearts that are 1 1/2" x 1 1/2" x 3/4" thick. I can adjust the thickness by how full I fill them but 1 1/2" x 1 1/2" is too big for a one-bite piece so I probably won't do it in that shape. But just for general knowledge, does it pop out of silicone molds without too much trouble?

It should. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Tri2Cook said:


I wanted to mold it in silicone heart-shaped molds but the smallest one I found has hearts that are 1 1/2" x 1 1/2" x 3/4" thick. I can adjust the thickness by how full I fill them but 1 1/2" x 1 1/2" is too big for a one-bite piece so I probably won't do it in that shape. But just for general knowledge, does it pop out of silicone molds without too much trouble?

Edit: Found some that are 3/4" x 3/4". That should work.

 

Yes it came right out with no issues

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By CCB
      I used my homemade toffee in a cookie recipe hoping that the toffee will add a crunch to the cookie... it didn't turn out well as the toffee melted and didn't keep its hardened crunch form. How can I prevent my toffee from melting in my cookie recipe?
    • By anonymouse
      I've been working with the Boiron purée recipe tables (chocolate and PdF, ice cream) - some good successes.  However the document is very terse and I wondered whether anyone who is experienced with these formulae might clarify what the expected result is:
       
      - "Fruit ganaches" and "Fruit and caramel ganaches".  I think these are supposed to produce a ganache for cutting and enrobing, although when I tried it came out far too soft to be dipped???
       
      - "Ganaches to be combined with fruit pastes" - I think these are to be layered above PdF and enrobed - is that right?
       
      - "Chocolate molded sweets" - Are these intended to be served as is, ie moulded without a layer of couverture going into the mould first? However the instructions talk about pouring into a frame.
       
      - "Fruity delight" - looks like a fairly light dessert to go into a parfait glass.  Has anyone done these and how do they turn out?  How do they compare to the sabayon-based ones in the Boiron ice cream book?
       
      I'm going to start working through some of the ice creams next week and it will be interesting to see how these turn out.
       
      Thanks for any advice.
       
    • By danielle_j
      Hello and Happy Holidays!  I own an ice cream company and am looking for some information about equipment to use for scaling large batches of caramel.  Right now, we cook sugar over electric heat in an approx. 6 qt. stainless steel pot.  Once the caramel is at the correct color and temp (more on that below), we add our dairy to the hot mixture.  Obviously, this is not a viable option for producing large batches.
       
      I'm familiar with confectionary equipment from Savage, but don't have the budget for an automated piece.  Does anyone have experience with using just one of their copper or stainless steel kettles over a regular sized burner on electric heat? We've tried to use a single larger flat bottom pot sitting in the middle of all 4 burners on the stove to make a large batch of caramel, but it doesn't heat evenly.  I'm wondering if the rounded bottom of the kettle helps the entire pot cook evenly -- would we be able to set the kettle right on the burner; or, have to use it in a double boiler setting?
       
      Additionally, any recommendations for thermometers that work well with caramel would be welcomed.  We've used digital probes and candy thermometers, but on numerous occasions, the color and smell of the caramel that we associate with "doneness" is a dramatically different temperature for each batch.
       
      I came across a similar post on this topic from 2016, but aside from a recommendation for a large piece of equipment from Savage, there wasn't any other feedback.  Hoping to get some good input that will bridge the gap between extremely small batches and mass production.
    • By Paul Bacino
      I want to make some candied mint leaves for a dessert. Would you blanch them first to set the color ? Dry them, coat in egg wash. Coat with confectioners sugar or super
      fine sugar ? Dry in oven at a low temp or on the counter? How long will they last?
      I will be serving this with a lemon panna cotta with a blueberry or blk berry sauce.
      Paul
    • By quiet1
      We have a local Italian bakery my mom loves, but they are very expensive and hard for her to get to. She also really likes cookbooks (she reads them even if she never cooks from them  ) so I was thinking for her birthday I could get her a cookbook that has similar cookies and cakes, and offer to make a few things for her on request also.
       
      I'll obviously look myself, but eGullet is always well informed about the quality of cookbooks so I wanted to know if anyone has any recommendations. The thing about the Italian bakery is that the stuff they make seems to me to be not as sweet as classic American recipes, and often have more complex flavors and also are usually on the light end for whatever the item is. (Like even something that's intended to be dense doesn't have a very heavy sensation in the mouth.)
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×