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Gordon Ramsay to headline on the Strip


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One of the worst-kept secrets in the Las Vegas dining scene has finally been announced in the press, Gordon Ramsay is going open a "Steakhouse" restaurant at Paris Hotel and Casino in the space formerly known as Les Artistes Steakhouse. I'm not particularly excited about Ramsay landing in Las Vegas, but my local friends down there are seemingly agog that the Chef who made the letter "F" famous will be a welcome addition to the dining scene on the Strip.

Now consider a few points for discussion. 1)., Does Las Vegas need another "Steakhouse" concept? 2)., Can Ramsay do anything unique to his Steakhouse that will set it on a higher level than the rest of the already crowded field? 3)., Is this an oxymoron-the rancourous British Chef comes to Las Vegas and opens a Steakhouse, (which is largely an American concept), in a "French-Themed" Hotel?

I guess I'm in the minority and not understanding this odd concept--the Ramsay Steakhouse. I imagine the Food and Beverage Executives must have done exhaustive marketing and demographic studies, preparing intricate graphs that told them pairing Ramsay with a Steakhouse concept would be a winner. I would personally prefer to see a menu presented in Las Vegas that echoes the dishes one would find in the London restaurants.

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I think its played out, I mean there are some great steaks on the strip and downtown...for $$$$ and for $....but., that said, tourists will flock to the place and pay way too much cash for what will be an average steak...that said, I might check it out...but only to call him Donkey!

Moo, Cluck, Oink.....they all taste good!

The Hungry Detective

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I think its played out, I mean there are some great steaks on the strip and downtown...for $$$$ and for $....but., that said, tourists will flock to the place and pay way too much cash for what will be an average steak...that said, I might check it out...but only to call him Donkey!

I agree--people will flock to the place if only to say they dined at the restaurant helmed by the Chef who says "F" to his minions. (And--they saw him on FOX). I've already committed to friends I'll join them down there when the place opens and I'll reserve judgement until then-but I'm still mystified by the concept.

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I did the whole evening at Hells Kitchen thing...it really was as bad as it looks on TV....but there was a lot of booze!

Booze and steak plays well in Vegas!

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I can't throw a pair of dice without hitting a steakhouse in Las Vegas.

The pairing of Gordon Ramsey with Paris is an odd combination. It's a decent mid-market Harrah's (err.. I mean Caesars) joint, but really doesn't say "really famous chef" like Bellagio, Wynn, Venetian, Caesars, etc. do. Will people go because of his celebrity? Sure. Just like they flock to Mesa Grill. Will he do better than the top steak joints like Carnevino or Cut? Dunno, Can he get away with something like that in Paris? (the casino.. not the city in France)

Jeff Meeker, aka "jsmeeker"

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I guess I'm in the minority and not understanding this odd concept--the Ramsay Steakhouse. I imagine the Food and Beverage Executives must have done exhaustive marketing and demographic studies, preparing intricate graphs that told them pairing Ramsay with a Steakhouse concept would be a winner. I would personally prefer to see a menu presented in Las Vegas that echoes the dishes one would find in the London restaurants.

That's not how it works. Casino operators throw pizzas at the wall to see what sticks. They'll try any damned thing (so long as the powerpoint presentation is halfway convincing.) If the plan works, they make lots of money. If it doesn't work, they change it, and they make slightly less money.

Who cares how time advances? I am drinking ale today. -- Edgar Allan Poe

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People go to Vegas to see performers who have acquired a certain level of fame and are just riding out that celebrity. Why should restaurants be any different?

Steakhouses are popular these days, and for a lot of Americans a "special" meal means steak. So celebrity+steakhouse is enough of a concept to fly in Vegas.

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Is there anything in general that is odd about Gordon Ramsey having a place on the strip? No way. If Thomas Keller, Guy Savoy, Joel Robochon, Wolfgang Puck, Mario Batali, Bobby Flay, Hubert Keller, Jose Andres, Laurent Tourendel, etc. etc. can have one (or more), than so can Gordon. Is it OK if it's a steakhouse? I suppose. Mario has a fantastic one. And I'm told that Wolgang's is top notch, too.

Honestly, I think it's great he is going to be on the Strip. But to be frank, I think I would prefer his place to NOT be a steakhouse. And I think another property would be more fitting for him, too. Caesars is the most obvious spot, but *maybe* Planet Hollywood would work.

Jeff Meeker, aka "jsmeeker"

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  • 2 months later...
  • 1 year later...

After much ballyhoo, Gordon Ramsay Steak is set to open at Paris Las Vegas on Friday, May 11--the same night of the Grand Tasting at Vegas Uncork'd. Ramsay is scheduled to open the restaurant that night in addition to showcasing some of his signature restaurant dishes at the annual bacchanalia that is the Grand Tasting.

You can read a press release about Gordon Ramsay Steak here. And don't forget to check in on our reports on Vegas Uncork'd here. If we're one of the fortunate few, we may be able to secure a seat in Ramsay's emporium and we'll report back on the Beef Wellington.

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  • 6 months later...

I ate at Gordon Ramsey Steak (hereinafter GRS) on Tuesday of last week. Sadly, it was as disappointing as it was expensive. I got a Wagyu strip steak, plus bone marrow and foie gras. The fancy fat was a mistake on my part as I was feeling a little queasy after that much gelatinous, fatty food. The pluses: the Wagyu steak was a fantastic piece of meat; the service was very good; the bearnaise sauce was excellent; the bread options were quite good. The bads: the steak was criminally underseasoned (I cook a better-tasting steak at home, albeit with a vastly inferior cut of meat) rendering the steak an overall big disappointment; the sides were not particularly good (my fiancee tried the fingerling potatoes which included "truffle chips" (IIRC) that seemed to be overcooked and dried out truffle-flavored mushroom caps); the restaurant has goon-looking floor managers constantly roaming the dining floor looking like security guards who made the dining experience somewhat uncomfortable; the foie gras was deeply disappointing (I've only had it one other time, at Alinea last year, when it was one of the most exquisite things I've ever tasted; GRS's version was charred and kind of flavorless -- it was just warm fat -- a huge drop in quality from Alinea (sure, GSR isn't trying for 3 Michelin stars, but what they did with the foie was a waste of an ingredient by comparison). The bone marrow was not "my thing" in the end, so I'm not going to criticisize the restaurant for my not liking it. It was served with a chimichurri sauce and was interesting, but occasionally gritty and not something I would order again. The mac & cheese was okay, but nothing special. We tried the toffee pudding and did not care for it, but again I put that down to my personal tastes rather than any defect in the restaurant. The meal was simply disappointing and nowhere near good enough to justify the hefty price tag.

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I had dinner at Gordon Ramsey Steak last night. I enjoyed the meal. Was it the BEST steak house experience I have had in Vegas? No. But it was good. And if someone who was interested in going asked me if they should go, I would tell them "Yes".

The hostess stand sits on the casino floor, a few feet from the door. One of the many attractive hostesses (this is Vegas, all restaurants do this), escorts your party into the place, telling you how you are leaving Paris and traveling through the chunnel into London. Then they point at something hanging from the ceiling. I don't quite make it out as the place is packed and loaded. But whatever. We arrived and were promptly seat at a table near the display kitchen. And right near the expediting station where one of the "Hells Kitchen" winners is working. I stopped watching the show long ago, so I have no clue who she is other than I know they have someone from the show working there (there is sign up in the casino with her picture). I'm one of the few that doesn't, though. There is a CONSTANT parade of customers coming up to that area to take pictures. They do it non-stop. They take them from far away, from the stairs leading to the second level, they get up somewhat close. The staff effortlessly glides around these people. The whole thing is nuts. can't imagine what it would be like if Chef Ramsey was in the house.

Anyway, back to the meal. Service starts with drink and wine menu presented on an iPad. We order some cocktails. At some point, they whell this big huge display of the meat offerings. This is a practice I could easily live without, but at least the meat isn't wrapped up in plastic. We take out time with ordering dinner. No big deal. Eventually, we get around to ordering the food. A plate of assorted breads arrives. The bread is actually warm. The mini pancetta and fig rolls were really good. We wind up asking for more and more of them, and they are happily brought over.

I ordered fried bluepoint oysters and a beef wellington for two that I am sharing with a friend. Everyone else orders a started and the remaining party members order the rib cap steak. Starters arrive promptly. The oysters are good. There are only four of them, though. An order of a half dozen raw on the half shell may have been a better value. But whatever. They were still good. Mains eventually show up. A bit long of a wait, I suppose, but not too terrible. We were in no rush anyway and took our time in ordering. The room is jam packed and we just keep getting a kick out of everyone taking pics of the Hell's Kitchen winner.

My beef wellington is decent. I don't typically order filet, but found the cut to be maybe not quite as tender as one would expected. It's seasoned fine. Cooked OK, though I could have had it a bit more rare. Pastry is part is not overwhelming or heavy or doughy. Sides of brusssell sprouts and fingerling potatoes were OK. Nothing special. But they did the job. the wellington was served on a bed of potato puree along with a small amount of roasted parsnips and carrots.

For dessert, I had the sticky toffee pudding. Very tasty. Very rich. Especially the brown butter ice cream. A friend ordered the coffee that comes with spoons of chocolate encased liquor. A presentation I had read about, but have never seen in person. there was enough coffee in the pot to use two of the three spoons provided.

Again, an over all good experience. Service was friendly, smooth and professional Everything delivered to the table at the same time by a team of people. No real glitches or snafus that I can recall. They are doing a good job considering the number of covers the place must be doing.

I've got pics of this on my phone. I'll have to take some time to get them uploaded to someplace so that I can link to them here.

Jeff Meeker, aka "jsmeeker"

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