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Heart of the Artichoke


MikeHartnett
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I'm on my local library's request list for the book, but I'm 6th in line (which means it will likely be another 15 weeks before I see it).

I loved Platter of Figs, too, but have only borrowed it from the library. Regarding the lack of discussion of the boo, you have to remember, these days most people don't seem to care about books that aren't by famous chefs or bloggers, or about unusual cuisines or cooking methods (by that I mean unusual for the average European-descended American, like regional Chinese food). It's hard for many people to get excited about a book for which none of those things apply, and it's a shame, I think.

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I loved Platter of Figs, too, but have only borrowed it from the library. Regarding the lack of discussion of the boo, you have to remember, these days most people don't seem to care about books that aren't by famous chefs or bloggers, or about unusual cuisines or cooking methods (by that I mean unusual for the average European-descended American, like regional Chinese food). It's hard for many people to get excited about a book for which none of those things apply, and it's a shame, I think.

Agreed, but Platter of Figs was a pretty highly regarded exception. I'm just surprised the people who enjoyed that one aren't looking at this one (or at least aren't talking about it).

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I loved Platter of Figs, too, but have only borrowed it from the library. Regarding the lack of discussion of the boo, you have to remember, these days most people don't seem to care about books that aren't by famous chefs or bloggers, or about unusual cuisines or cooking methods (by that I mean unusual for the average European-descended American, like regional Chinese food). It's hard for many people to get excited about a book for which none of those things apply, and it's a shame, I think.

Agreed, but Platter of Figs was a pretty highly regarded exception. I'm just surprised the people who enjoyed that one aren't looking at this one (or at least aren't talking about it).

I don't recall Platter of Figs even being discussed on eG, so it may have been an exception elsewhere, but it wasn't here. Contrary to popular belief, I think what I wrote above applies just as much here as to any other group (although PoF got a few mentions on Chow, so I guess the folks there are one up), perhaps even more so. Like I said, it's a shame.

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Contrary to popular belief, I think what I wrote above applies just as much here as to any other group (although PoF got a few mentions on Chow, so I guess the folks there are one up), perhaps even more so. Like I said, it's a shame.

I definitely agree with that. In fact, I'd take it one step further and say it applies to me personally, for the most part. But Platter of Figs really got me thinking, because all the recipes sounded like things I'd normally pass over for not sounding "interesting" enough. Every single one of them turned out spectacularly, though, and it kind of made me reconsider whether something has to be exotic to be delicious.

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Contrary to popular belief, I think what I wrote above applies just as much here as to any other group (although PoF got a few mentions on Chow, so I guess the folks there are one up), perhaps even more so. Like I said, it's a shame.

I definitely agree with that. In fact, I'd take it one step further and say it applies to me personally, for the most part. But Platter of Figs really got me thinking, because all the recipes sounded like things I'd normally pass over for not sounding "interesting" enough. Every single one of them turned out spectacularly, though, and it kind of made me reconsider whether something has to be exotic to be delicious.

I have this cookbook as well as his Platter of Figs book.

I tend to agree with your reconsideration of something being exotic to be delicious. I have a continuing argument with a friend of mine, who doesn't really see the value of something simply prepared. He likes to go over the top, with menus, and with cooking various dishes. He says he gets bored with food such as David Tanis cooks.

Having eaten at Chez Panisse, where David Tanis is a chef, I saw where simplicity could be mindblowingly good.

Christine

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