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Michelin Stars 2011


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yet Darroze, where the general consensus seems to be mediocre across the board, gets elevated in the space of 2/3 years.

We had a meal at Helene Darroze back in November (which I will get around to write up soon) and good as it was, there seemed no hint of two star status, food wise at least. Perhaps location helps it out a bit, who knows.

"So many places, so little time"

http://londoncalling...blogspot.co.uk/

@d_goodfellow1

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yet Darroze, where the general consensus seems to be mediocre across the board, gets elevated in the space of 2/3 years.

We had a meal at Helene Darroze back in November (which I will get around to write up soon) and good as it was, there seemed no hint of two star status, food wise at least. Perhaps location helps it out a bit, who knows.

Looking forward to your review.

We had a couple of meals at Darroze since December 2009 and while we wouldn't have thought they were of 2* quality as a whole, some individual dishes were actually marvellous, so even if undeserved, I wouldn't say these two stars are the biggest scandal ever...

On the basis of my single meal at Loubet, certainly a star to him, which Rayner seems to think such an obvious recognition, would have been equally misplaced.

One thing where I think they were spot on is Gauthier.

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The general consensus seems to be that UK restaurants had a raw deal. I don’t think so. I think Michelin are much too generous. The majority of single stars we have tried in the UK (and that is quite a few) have been very disappointing and not worth returning to. Cheap ingredient poorly cooked and often a lot of the dishes, especially the desserts, are mass produced and come from the ‘foodservice’ chains. As for the five new 1*’s this time, I can name one that certainly does not warrant a star. Come on Michelin you have lost it, you used to be known for high standards but not any more. Helene Darroze is a case in point. :hmmm:

Pam Brunning Editor Food & Wine, the Journal of the European & African Region of the International Wine & Food Society

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I notice that Quilon has kept it's star this year, which I find interesting, as my family and I went to Quilon last Friday. I have to say, I was rather disappointed by it. Some of the dishes were very good, other dishes were distinctly average. Decor was lovely and staff were friendly and attentive, but there were some blips in the service such as when my lassi came and it was rather warm. I would probably give it another shot in the future, as some dishes did show promise, but considering the price and the michelin star I was not very impressed.

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No I won't name & shame Nick - they all have a living to make but here is a link My link (hopefully - I am not very good with links) click on Food & Wine September and read pages 10, 11, 12 and maybe next time you will recognise some of the dishes.

Edited by Pam Brunning (log)

Pam Brunning Editor Food & Wine, the Journal of the European & African Region of the International Wine & Food Society

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A good piece in the Wall Street Journal by Paul Levy pointing to the irrelevance of a guide which tells people what they already know and not what they’d love to find out here

Instead Londoners (and visitors) want to know about Chinese, Indian, Vietnamese, Thai, Turkish and Middle Eastern restaurants. Is their cooking superior? Do they cook regional specialities? If so, from which regions and what are the characteristics of the dishes? Which are good value for money?
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No I won't name & shame Nick - they all have a living to make but here is a link My link (hopefully - I am not very good with links) click on Food & Wine September and read pages 10, 11, 12 and maybe next time you will recognise some of the dishes.

Well I don't recognise any of those photos of dishes from any Michelin starred places I've been.

Do any other eGulleteers?

Pam, I think accusing starred restaurants of serving pre-made desserts and then refusing to name them is a little disingenous. Should we conclude that it isn't in fact true?

Personally it doesn't bother me if Michael Caines orders raw ingredients from 3663 particularly although obviously I'd rather see local produce sourced directly if possible.

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I can assure it is true I had a lemon tart with raspberry sorbet at a local restaurant that I know was massed produced, then had the identical dish two weeks later at a one * restaurant.

Just got in from a excellent Chinese but you wouldn’t want to hear about that, it hasn’t got a star. :biggrin:

Pam Brunning Editor Food & Wine, the Journal of the European & African Region of the International Wine & Food Society

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Michael Nadells whole multi million pound patisserie empire is based on the fact that many "high end" places pass off his excellent product as their own.

Some even have the cheek to have the delivery boxes logo'd with their branding rather than Nadells in order to complete the illusion and head off the scurrilous rumours...

http://www.nadellpatisserie.com/welcome.htm

http://www.caterersearch.com/Articles/1994/07/07/7133/Michael-Nadell.htm

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Yes Nadell's desserts are great, I know chefs that use them. He is a wonderful craftsman, he did a demo for me years ago before he started his own business.

I would rather have a pud from someone like him where the dish has been refined and perfected. A small pub/restaurant often relies on an owner/chef (no large team in the kitchen) - he may be good at vianades but has little skill as a pastry chef - I would rather have a brought in pud - better than the lump of rubber that I have been served in a Michelin 1* before now in the guise of a bread & butter pud.

I know of only one 'one man band' kitchen that excells in every branch of the craft, that is David Everitt-Mattias at Le Champignon Sauvage. Normaly to perfect every course you must have a good team.

3663 'whites' range - which is their top, is good - it should be, millions of pounds go into their R&D.

Pam Brunning Editor Food & Wine, the Journal of the European & African Region of the International Wine & Food Society

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The general consensus seems to be that UK restaurants had a raw deal. I don’t think so. I think Michelin are much too generous. The majority of single stars we have tried in the UK (and that is quite a few) have been very disappointing and not worth returning to. Cheap ingredient poorly cooked and often a lot of the dishes, especially the desserts, are mass produced and come from the ‘foodservice’ chains. As for the five new 1*’s this time, I can name one that certainly does not warrant a star. Come on Michelin you have lost it, you used to be known for high standards but not any more. Helene Darroze is a case in point. :hmmm:

At the same time -to weigh in with my own anecdote- I can think of several 1 star restaurants in the UK which have been better than 2 star establishments in France and Germany.

I'd probably agree to an extent that some of the new stars are a bit odd, but there's a fair few 1 stars that deserve elevation, probably the same for 2 stars as well

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At the same time -to weigh in with my own anecdote- I can think of several 1 star restaurants in the UK which have been better than 2 star establishments in France and Germany.

Texture comes to mind, I had dinner there not long after it got a star last year and was very impressed. Surprised Agnar Sverisson didn't get a rising two star considering the Michelin men know him well... but then again, he's not French.

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On the contrary, I personally would be very interested -

Me too. As folk will have seen from my posts, the vast majority of my restaurant visits are to non-starred "good neighbourhood places".

Edited by Harters (log)

John Hartley

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It was my birthday, I was relaxing, so didn’t take a camera. As I share a birthday with Burns we tend to go ethnic - less likelihood of coming across a rogue haggis! :shock:

We enjoyed it so much that I have organised an evening there for our branch of the Society in February - we are having the full works - the lobster feast - the lot - so I will have my camera and will be writing a full report. Watch this space.

Pam Brunning Editor Food & Wine, the Journal of the European & African Region of the International Wine & Food Society

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