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Gingko Nuts


Suvir Saran
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>What do you use Gingko nuts for?

Mostly as you would use any other kind of nut, as an

accent in things like Buddha's Delight; a few nights ago

they appeared in a stuffed quail that my gf had at Cheong

Liew's place; you can also eat them as a snack.

>Do you ever see people picking them up from the street?

No. When I was growing up there was a street that had

the trees, and it is said that people would pick them; I

don't recall that - all I remember is the hideous smell of

the street at fruiting time.

>Medicinal uses?

Supposed to be good for bladder things; I wouldn't

guarantee that, though.

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I love ginko nuts, called ginnan in Japanese.

These are very popular in Japan and are always found at the bottom of chawanmushi (steamed egg custard) they are also often found in braises and stirfries.My favorite way of eating them is roasted in the shells in a fry pan and then eaten while still hot.

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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Years back when i had an office job for the nyc parks dept the Parkies used to complain about people picking ginko nuts in a particular park (don't remember which). The parkies said something about people picking the nuts...leaving behind a stinky mess (of discarded material) that people step in. Plus...the parkies wanted to propegate them...which was tough if all the nuts were taken.

-Jason

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Since trees along streets are planted generally at the same time, they tend to come to maturity all at the same time. Twenty-two or so years after planting gingko trees there would arise such a stink as to cause people to consider selling their homes. :laugh:

"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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We have numerous females as street trees in our neighborhood. There is competition for the nuts. We collect them when our supply runs low. (They can be frozen.) They stink.

Hulled, washed and dried, skewered, grilled or sauteed with soy sauce. Bitter, but delicious.

New York City also has a significant number of large, mature gingko trees that are spectacular specimens in their appearance.

Who said "There are no three star restaurants, only three star meals"?

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The gingko tree is one of the very remaining "pre-historic" trees. Fascinating leaf structure, rightly appearing ubiqitously in Japanese kitsch.

"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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