Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Winter Warmers


Zacky
 Share

Recommended Posts

This morning in West London is COLD! Foggy and freezing. My usual trawl of the Internet turned up very little inspiration for top 10 winter warmers. So, I thought I'd turn to the eGullet folks and see what turned up.

Here's my own:

  1. Steak and Kidney pudding (steamed for 5 hours)
  2. French onion soup
  3. Lamb stew/casserole
  4. Shepherd's Pie
  5. Leek and potato soup
  6. Fish Pie
  7. Split Pea and Ham soup
  8. Lamb curry (Achaari Ghosht)
  9. Boeuf Bourguignon
  10. Bangers and mash with roasted red onion gravy

So hit me with your lists!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Mmm, we have topics on a lot of these dishes, too.

1. Shepherd's/cottage pie

2. Baked ham with gratin potatoes

3. Nikkujyaga

4. Chinese-style hotpot ( as opposed to Lancashire)

5. lasagne

6. any kind of risotto

7. tonkotsu ramen

8. pudding with custard

9. beans on toast

10. tomato soup and a grilled cheese sandwich

Special shout-out to a breakfast on a snowy morning: fresh brewed coffee and a warm cinnamon buns.

Anything with steam rising off, really.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Mine are:

Pepperpot soup

Bean soup with cornbread

Potato soup with dumplings

Chicken & dumplings

Mushroom risotto

Spicy chestnut soup

Scalloped potatoes with ham or smoked pork chops.

Pumpkin soup

Chili

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Mmmmm - do you make your own tomato soup? Any recipes?

I do! But it's nothing special - just a tin of good tomatoes, simmered for ten minutes in a pool of light olive oil, to which I've added a little fresh smashed ginger at the beginning. When the oil turns orange, I add an equal portion of stock; simmer it for another five, then whizz it in the blender (even easier if you have an immersion stick blender). Salt and pepper to taste. It makes two servings.

Marcella Hazan's Pasta e Ceci soup is quite decadent to have alongside a sandwich, if you leave out the "pasta" part when you're making it - I often do and rarely miss it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I actually don't make tomato soups at home. I found a box product that I like and I've been using that. It's Trader Joe's tomato soup w/ roasted red pepper.

Another winter warmer: oxtail!

That's my favorite too, although I like all the TJ's soups.

I also like to combine the tomato/pepper or the red pepper soups with TJ's Black Beluga Lentils (microwavable) and crumble some feta or other crumbly cheese on top.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sounds good! I'm going to make some tomato soup soon - like the idea of ginger in there for some kick.

Another winter warmer: oxtail!

I recently made the Escoffier recipe of Oxtail soup: recipe

Minus the "gelatinous bones" (my local butcher already thinks I'm strange!) and the result was the most amazing clear broth with the sweet carrots and oxtail meat sitting down there at the bottom of the bowl. It wasn't quite the Oxtail I remember from childhood - more of a British affair, with some of the meat blended into the stock (negating the need for all the clarification) to make a thicker soup. Still, glad I tried it.

Tonight I'm trying London Particular

An attempt to match weather with food in more than one way!

Edited by Zacky (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sounds good! I'm going to make some tomato soup soon - like the idea of ginger in there for some kick.

Another winter warmer: oxtail!

I recently made the Escoffier recipe of Oxtail soup: recipe

Minus the "gelatinous bones" (my local butcher already thinks I'm strange!) and the result was the most amazing clear broth with the sweet carrots and oxtail meat sitting down there at the bottom of the bowl. It wasn't quite the Oxtail I remember from childhood - more of a British affair, with some of the meat blended into the stock (negating the need for all the clarification) to make a thicker soup. Still, glad I tried it.

Tonight I'm trying London Particular

An attempt to match weather with food in more than one way!

What are gelatinous bones?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Mm, Meat Pie (which I am making on Saturday, along with steak fries and a salad, for a beer tasting). Chicken and Dumplings. Anything gravyish ladled over egg noodles. Thick lentil and or squash soups. Dal. Beans and greens, southern, Italian, Indian, Southern Italian and Indian, whatever, the combination, with some kind of pork is one of our staple winter meals, with rice, cornbread, something.

Spicy soupy things.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What are gelatinous bones?

I'm not 100% sure; it's an Escoffier recipe after all, so quite old. I'm sure every butcher 100 years ago would have some to dole out but not these days. After reading this my best bet would be the cartillage from cow's feet and ears etc, which really produce a lot of gelatin when cooked long and slow. I made pig's trotters a while ago and the resulting food basically set when I left it in the fridge! I think Escoffier's desired end product was quite a viscous but clear soup. I did add the arrow root though to get some of the same effect and that worked fine.

Edited by Zacky (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Heres mine

Scouse

Sausage Mash and Onion Gravy

Lancashire Hotpot

Veg and Lentil Soup

Shepherds Pie

Meat and Potato Pie

Spag Bol

Pasticcio

Mixed Veg Curry and Pilau Rice

Steak pudding chips and peas (from a decent chippy if you can find one)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well that started a "discussion" here Chris,

My OH usually makes it (Shes a scouser, and an evertonian) and theres generally a lot said in this house about the merits of scouse vs lancashire hotpot as opinions are divided.

That aside I asked for a recipe and to be fair I got a list of ingredients and a cooking method which reflect the reality of many handed down recipes they are guidlines and you use what you have got.

Ingredients

Stewing beef - as much as you have/how many are you feeding?

Potatoes peeled large chunks

Onions chopped

Stock/OXO/Gravy Granules - whatever you have

Worcester Sauce /Tomato puree if you have some a good splash/dash

Root veg if you have them carrots and turnips generally peeled large chunks

She prefers to use a pressure cooker, add all ingredients to pot and cover with stock/water, pressure cook for 45mins to an hour.

This can be thickened when cooked if its needed- serve with crusty bread (my preference is a tiger loaf)

The only rules in our house are that the meat must be beef off the bone and there must be potatoes and onions.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My top 10, although the order can change from day to day:

1. Pot roast

2. Red beans and rice

3. White bean and sausage soup

4. Vegetable beef soup (made with the leftover pot roast)

5. Chili

6. Posole (for which I will ever be indebted to Chris Amirault for his mother-in-law's recipe!)

7. Slow-roasted pork with whatever spices and sides spark my interest that day

8. Tomato soup with a grilled cheese sandwich

9. Pasta e fagioli

10. Single malt scotch (preferably Glenmorangie), two ice cubes.

Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Chicken Fricassee

Vegetarian Chili

Vegetarian Tortilla Soup (with black beans, etc.)

Chicken Noodle Soup

Baked Garnet Sweet Potatoes

Indian-Spiced Chickpea Soup

Matzoh Ball Soup

Curried Cauliflower Soup with Coriander Chutney

Cuban Shrimp Stew

Vegetarian Lasagna

Spiced Hot Chocolate

Edited by merstar (log)
There's nothing better than a good friend, except a good friend with CHOCOLATE.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

All of the above look wonderful, to which I'd add a few:

Comfort foods in general

Corn Chowder

Stews

Beans and rice

Lentils - especially beluga lentils

Anything that keeps the oven going for hours

Breads

Pizzas

Edited by cbread (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Lentils - especially beluga lentils

Yum yum - this is why I started this string! You've reminded me of the Spanish staple 'lentejas'; slowly cooked lentils with morcilla sausage (their version of a blood sausage but wildly superior to most, with lots of onions and spice) and any other lovely piggy products. I love the addition of toccino - pig fat. It's a wholesome and worthy dish. The recipe I have is by the excellent folk at Moro in Exmouth Market in London.

I'm revising my original list. OUT - Fish Pie and NEW IN at number 6 is lentejas.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...