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Darienne

Capirotada

5 posts in this topic

I've found several recipes now for Capirotada online and I'd like to make it for Sunday supper. Yes, I mean supper. Dessert as dinner for the McAuleys and like-minded friends. Not to forget that I am still in the land of easily obtainable Hispanic type ingredients.

What is your favorite recipe, please?


Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

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I've found several recipes now for Capirotada online and I'd like to make it for Sunday supper. Yes, I mean supper. Dessert as dinner for the McAuleys and like-minded friends. Not to forget that I am still in the land of easily obtainable Hispanic type ingredients.

What is your favorite recipe, please?

From November 2010 to May 2012 without ever actually making the Capirotada. Shame on me.

So today, for tomorrow, Cinco de Mayo and 1st anniversary of splitting open the back of my head...ouch...big time...I finally made it, and we have already eaten it, I along with Ed's assistant builder, Dawn, who loves to eat my cooking...whatever I make. Dawn hammers and builds. I cook.

OMG, delicious. Scrumptious. Recipe by Pati Jinich, Going Nuts and Bananas for Capirotada with changes...bien sur...found in other recipes. Nothing dramatic. Well, except for the Hand of Buddha syrup ferried home from Moab in mid-January, used when I didn't have enough piloncillo syrup #2, having already tossed syrup #1 for too much cinnamon and cloves for DH. And the homemade Challah. And left out the prunes and added apples. And doubled the nuts. Whatever. :raz:

We'll eat this again. It will be featured at the Annual Dog Weekend for our Mexican Feast on Saturday. :wub: :wub:

P9250003.JPG


Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

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I love the idea of dessert for supper! Might have to try that one of these days :smile:

Your capirotada looks lovely. Going to have to try that too.

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We did have it for supper tonight and I added more shredded 2 yr old cheddar (Canadian) to it. Delicious.

We have had "Dessert as Dinner" once or twice a month for years now. It means that you can have a large portion of dessert and not as an afterthought. Of course, the dessert has to have a certain number of ingredients in it. We don't have chocolate cake. Grains, dairy, eggs, fruit, nuts in some combination works perfectly. Sorry. I think I am proselytizing now. :raz:


Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

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http://patismexicantable.com/2011/11/going-nuts-and-bananas-for-capirotada.html Recipe for Capirotada made again yesterday. Forgot to double the cheese. And used the recipe's syrup with two problems: DH does not like cinnamon or cloves so I left them out and it resulted, along with the un-doubled cheddar cheese, in a somewhat bland result...tasty but lacking in punch. Also the 8 cups of water with piloncillo took CONSIDERABLY longer to reduce than the 25 minutes allotted by the directions. Tried sour cream on top...wrong (for us).

So I found the end of the Buddha's hand syrup and poured it over the finished product. Great improvement. I think we may be addicted to stronger tastes. I find myself doubling a lot of spices and herbs and hot peppers, etc, in recipes.

SO...I made notes on the recipe page and will do it again. Working up to making it for the Annual Dog Weekend folks.


Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

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