Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Martini Garnishes


Chris Hennes
 Share

Recommended Posts

I'm sitting here with a garnish-free martini. Mostly out of laziness, but also because I am out of olives and didn't feel like a twist tonight. I've had Hendricks martinis garnished with cucumber, and of course there is the Gibson. Which all got me to thinking, what other garnishes are there out there that people put on their (gin) martinis?

Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Have you seen Linda's latest post on Playing with Fire and Water? She did a martini with lime basil infused gin, dry vermouth and filtered tomato water. She garnished it with cherry tomatoes that were skinned, packed in a jar with salt and vermouth and fridged for a couple days. I realize that's more a geared-towards-this-drink garnish but I like the idea.

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The twist doesn't have to be lemon, even though that might be the default option. Lime, orange or grapefruit twists are awfully nice in their own ways if one is feeling so inclined. Tomolives are tasty. The stuffed olive option leaves lots of options too - almond, hot pepper, blue cheese, garlic, etc. Any sort of homemade pickle could be delicious too. I made a memorable martini with a pickled okra in it that was mighty tasty...Depends what's in the pantry that day and how adventurous (or lazy) I'm feeling. Could be the thing I reach for is convenient or genius or in a perfect world it's both! :smile:

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Have you seen Linda's latest post on Playing with Fire and Water? She did a martini with lime basil infused gin, dry vermouth and filtered tomato water.

[...]

*cough*Not a Martini*cough*

Though she does at least acknowledge her heresy, "It seems that anything can be called a martini these days. I'm not a purist, but to me, a martini is not defined by the vessel that it's served in, but by the inclusion of gin and vermouth. Beyond that, any added flavor is fair game."

---

Erik Ellestad

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...

Bernal Heights, SF, CA

Link to comment
Share on other sites

*cough*Not a Martini*cough*

I knew that was coming and I'll defer to greater cocktail knowledge but I'd argue that it's as much a martini as a "dirty martini". A little tomato water instead of olive brine. Of course, I don't know if the purists consider the dirty version a martini either so maybe it's a wasted argument. :biggrin:

Edit: because apparently I can't spell this morning.

Edited by Tri2Cook (log)

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm sitting here with a garnish-free martini. Mostly out of laziness, but also because I am out of olives and didn't feel like a twist tonight. I've had Hendricks martinis garnished with cucumber, and of course there is the Gibson. Which all got me to thinking, what other garnishes are there out there that people put on their (gin) martinis?

For me the garnish should be selected dependent on what gin is used. So a strip of cucumber or rose petal for Hendrick's, grapefruit zest for Tanqueray 10 and Martin Miller's, lemon zest for Tanqueray and Plymouth, orange for Beefeater, lime zest for Bombay, and so on.

I also quite like a sliver of spring onion which is a great accompaniment to many gins and vermouth. And obviously there's the green olive, black olive, pickled onion variants. What about celery and the like?

Evo-lution - Consultancy, Training and Events

Dr. Adam Elmegirab's Bitters - Bitters

The Jerry Thomas Project - Tipplings and musings

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What about something herbal, to play off the vermouth? Maybe a sprig of dill or basil, or possibly even chamomile. I mention these in particular because it's what I've got growing in the back yard at the moment, and I gotta pick the rest of it tonight before it all freezes. Damn, now I'll have to make several martinis tonight! :hmmm:

Never did get around to making that Catnip Julep. Still time, though.

Mike

"The mixing of whiskey, bitters, and sugar represents a turning point, as decisive for American drinking habits as the discovery of three-point perspective was for Renaissance painting." -- William Grimes

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've always leaned to the citrus twist. Cucumber is fine as well. I have never cared for olives in martinis. I think this came from having too many from that gallon size jar of olives that some bars have that has been sitting on a shelf for a year or so.

And as discussed on another topic I guess my preference in gin leans towards the citrus as opposed to the juniper. And I won't restart that discussion, I promise

Edited by lancastermike (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

So a strip of cucumber or rose petal for Hendrick's, grapefruit zest for Tanqueray 10 and Martin Miller's, lemon zest for Tanqueray and Plymouth, orange for Beefeater, lime zest for Bombay, and so on.

Hm. A lime twist with Plymouth (my significant other's default martini) beats lemon on my palate. Grapefruit with Martin Miller's is an interesting idea, though... clearly I need an excuse to spend some time experimenting!

John Rosevear

"Brown food tastes better." - Chris Schlesinger

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I ended up putting a sprig of fennel in a martini last night (forgot I had that when I posted then). It was 5:1 using Junipero Gin and Vya Vermouth. The fennel added a nice subtle aroma to each sip.

Edited by brinza (log)

Mike

"The mixing of whiskey, bitters, and sugar represents a turning point, as decisive for American drinking habits as the discovery of three-point perspective was for Renaissance painting." -- William Grimes

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...