Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Deep-fried eggs? Just a Spanish thing?


 Share

Recommended Posts

I just started going to the Hofmann culinary school in Barcelona and last week we did eggs. One of the ways we prepared the eggs was to basically poach them in hot oil, in other words, we deep-fried them. The chef instructor said that this was the way that grandmothers do it but I don't remember my grandmother (or anyone else for that matter) frying an egg like that! Everyone else in the class seemed to think it was a fairly normal thing to do. I'm American though so maybe this is something unique to Spain? Has anyone ever seen this done in the US? I'm not talking about just frying the egg in a lot of oil- I'm talking about literally dropping the egg into a saucepan FILLED with super hot oil. It tasted great in the end by the way!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

They use a lot of oil to fry eggs in Thailand, but I don't know that I'd consider it deep fried. My dad used a small pan (maybe 5" diameter?) and had about 1/4" or so of oil in it.

He used to fry bread like that, too, but I think he picked up that habit when he was in boarding school in Wales.

Edited by prasantrin (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not a Spanish thing per se, but a European thing. That's a traditional way they do it in

France as well. I learned it (or at least it was demoed) at French Culinary Institute (in NYC) and there is

an episode of Fast Food My Way (Jacques Pepin) where he does it. I believe he calls it Eggs Lyonais.

And yes, they are delicious. :biggrin:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had an egg like that years ago in Montreal. All I can remember is that it was Old School and somehow precooked before the hot oil, and it tasted very good.

I think of oil poaching as a gentle low-temp way to get moist fish, and deep fryers as 400+F cauldrons.

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I saw this on an old episode of Julia Child & Company on the Cooking channel. She fried them in olive oil. It was surprisingly loud and if I did it I would wear a full apron, mask, and welding gloves in the event that one of the eggs exploded and sent hot oil flying everywhere.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When I lived in Spain, another egg cooking technique that seemed unique was flicking hot oil over the fried egg. In other words, they would fry the egg sunny side up in a decent amount of oil and use a spatula to toss hot oil onto the top of the egg to cook that side a little. Several home cooks I met did this.

And it was always olive oil. Once I tried to cook my eggs in butter, and my Spanish roommate asked me if I was French.

Todd A. Price aka "TAPrice"

Homepage and writings; A Frolic of My Own (personal blog)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When I lived in Spain, another egg cooking technique that seemed unique was flicking hot oil over the fried egg. In other words, they would fry the egg sunny side up in a decent amount of oil and use a spatula to toss hot oil onto the top of the egg to cook that side a little. Several home cooks I met did this.

My New England grandmother always cooked eggs this way.

As for deep fried, only Scotch eggs that I know of are done that way. Whole nother beast though.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Those eggs sound delicious!

When I was a teenager I was taken to Majorca on a holiday, and I remember going to a cafe and seeing 'egg and chips' on the menu and ordering it, thinking it was some sort of authentic Spanish meal :laugh: (I also had some fabulous grilled rabbit if that makes up for it at all). Anyway, it WAS delicious, both egg and chips cooked in loads of olive oil, with the oil definately spooned/flicked over the top of the egg. The olive oil part was unusual and tasty, but the basting was familiar: my German father, who was thin as a rake all his life, used to do the same thing when cooking eggs in bacon fat, before then soaking up the bacon fat with bread.... When I told him about the oil fried eggs, he added them into his fried eggs repertoire. And these days I still cook my eggs in oil in preference to butter - they taste cleaner to me somehow - and I love the way the hot oil ruffles their edges.

Kylie Kwong has a recipe for deep fried eggs which are excellent in a similar ruffled-edge way, with the delicious addition of chilli ... so it looks like they're done in a few parts of the world.

And don't forget son-in-law eggs, although they're boiled before deep-frying...Never tried them, but they sound awfully good.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sipping at my after-lunch coffee, I thought I'd look it up again.

FPC, Penguin Books (USA) 1999, p. 187: Oeufs Frits.

(fried eggs as known in the anglo world are oeufs sur le plat, au plat or au miroir.

By fried eggs the French usually understand eggs fried in deep fat or oil, one at a time; they puff up like fritters, are taken out with a perforated spoon and laid on a cloth to drain...

... Here are the directions given by the famous Cuisinier Durand of Nimes, published in 1830...

QUIET!  People are trying to pontificate.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When I lived in Spain, another egg cooking technique that seemed unique was flicking hot oil over the fried egg. In other words, they would fry the egg sunny side up in a decent amount of oil and use a spatula to toss hot oil onto the top of the egg to cook that side a little. Several home cooks I met did this.

And it was always olive oil. Once I tried to cook my eggs in butter, and my Spanish roommate asked me if I was French.

the traditional technique here in jordan is to do that with ghee or clarified butter... not the lightest preparation, but delicious...

a special seasonal treat is to cook eggs this way with white ghee in springtime (ghee made from Ewes milk)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

David Thompson has a recipe in his Thai Food book for Deep fried eggs which are served with sweetened fish sauce.

They also make deep fried boiled eggs as a dish called son-in-law eggs which is served with a tamarind and chili sauce as a salad.

Edited by nickrey (log)

Nick Reynolds, aka "nickrey"

"The Internet is full of false information." Plato
My eG Foodblog

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When I lived in Spain, another egg cooking technique that seemed unique was flicking hot oil over the fried egg. In other words, they would fry the egg sunny side up in a decent amount of oil and use a spatula to toss hot oil onto the top of the egg to cook that side a little. Several home cooks I met did this.

Yes, I always fry eggs this way as well, for the simple reason that that's how my mother used to do it. In fact, I was quite shocked when I learned that people sometimes turn them over!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Similar Content

    • By Spanishrecipes
      I thought my first post should be a recipe to share with you all. It is one of the most popular dishes on my website.

      Shopping list
      pinch of saffron (azafrán) 1 tsp oregano or thyme (orégano o tomillo) 4 cups fish or vegetable stock (caldo de pescado o verduras) 2 tsp sweet smoked paprika (pimentón dulce ahumado) 1 bay leaf (hoja de laurel) olive oil (aciete de oliva) 1 onion (cebolla) 1 red pepper (pimiento rojo) 3 garlic clove (dientes de ajo) 2 cups of paella rice such as 'bahía-senia' or 'bomba' (arroz bomba o bahía-senia) 1 large tomato (tomate) 1 large fillet of white fish such as haddock or cod (filete de pescado blanco) handful of mussels (puñado de mejillones) handful of clams (puñado de almejas) 4-6 large prawns (langostinos) parsley (perejil) chives (cebollinos) freshly ground black pepper (pimienta recién molida negro) Method for Seafood Paella recipe

      Warm the saffron in a medium saucepan for about 30 seconds and then add 4 cups of stock, the paprika and a bay leaf. Simmer very gently.

      If using whole prawns, break off the heads, remove the shells and de-vein. Then add the heads to the stock (if using vegetable stock) and put the prawn bodies to one side.

      Tip: to prepare whole prawns, just break off the heads by twisting with your hands and then carefully pull the shells away from the belly. Once removed you will notice a thin black line along the prawn, this often contains grit and sand. Run a knife along this line and then remove the vein with the tip of the knife.

      Warm two tablespoons of olive oil in a paella pan and then add the very finely chopped onion, pepper, oregano and garlic. Soften for about 7-8 minutes.

      Tip: leave some longer strips of pepper for garnishing.

      Add the rice and stir well. Then grate the tomato into the rice so the flesh passes through the grater but the skin does not. Continue stirring until the rice starts to dry out. Drain the stock, add half to the rice and simmer for 10 minutes.

      Meanwhile, wash your clams and mussels, removing any grit and cutting off the beards. Then, add the clams, mussels and prawns to the pan, pushing down into the rice and then add half of the remaining stock and simmer for about 7 minutes.

      Cut the haddock fillet into small portions and fry in a splash of olive oil in a separate hot pan, skin-side down for about 4 minutes until the skin is browned and crisp. Remove and place to one side.

      Tip: when crisping the skin of fish, try not to move it while it is cooking as you will damage the skin. After about four minutes on a high heat you should be able to ease a palette knife under the skin and lift.

      Add the rest of the stock to the pan and simmer for 5 more minutes and then add the fish pieces, flesh-side down and continue to simmer for a couple more minutes until the liquid is all gone.

      At this point you should taste the rice and it should just be cooked. Season with pepper and then remove from the heat, cover with foil and leave to stand for 5 minutes.

      Finally garnish with parsley and chives and serve with bread and lemon wedges. This seafood paella recipe is perfect for sharing with friends and family and always raises a smile.

      Enjoy!
    • Guest
      By Guest
      Vinagreta -- Spanish Vinaigrette
      This vinaigrette is especially good on hot summer days. Serve with beans (all kinds: garbanzo, broad, white, judiones....), fish or whatever you want!



      Ingredients:
      1 whole fresh tomato
      1 hard boiled egg (remove yolk & chop the egg white & yolk separately)
      1 shallot (finely chopped)
      1 T finely chopped parsley
      1/2 c olive oil
      1/4 c vinagre de jerez (sherry vinegar: typical of Andalucia; substitute with wine vinegar)
      Salt (to taste)
      Pepper (to taste)

      Directions:
      1. Put the shallots, finely chopped tomato & chopped egg white in a medium size bowl.
      2. In a separate bowl whisk the oil & vinegar; add salt and pepper.
      3. Add the oil & vinegar to the tomatoes, shallots & chopped egg white.
      4. When serving sprinkle with chopped egg yolk & parsley.
      More of My Spanish Recipes
      Keywords: Easy, Vegetarian, Sauce, Spanish/Portugese
      ( RG546 )
    • By thecuriousone
      Hi All-
      I tried a recipe out of The good cook, James and Jellies over the weekend. It is a bitter orange, lemon and watermelon Jam. Actually its more like a marmalade. The recipe went together easily, but a curious thing happened while I was cooking it. The recipe said to add 3 cups of sugar for each 4 cups of fruit and simmer slowly for 1 hour. I did that but at the end of the hour, the consistency still seemed thin. My first though was to reduce it further. I pulled some out of the pot to taste and continued to reduce. I never did get to a really jelled consistency, however the taste started to change, it lost the fresh watermelon flavor and took on almost a "tea taste" like the sugars in the watermelon had carmelized. It doesnt taste bad but should I have taken another approach? I'm not familiar enough with sure gel to use it if its not called for in a recipe.
      Any help would be appreciated. Its a beautiful jam, I would just like to maintain the fresh watermelon taste and have it thicker.
    • By Prawncrackers
      Hola egulleters! Those of you who know me know that I like to turn my hand at Charcuterie now and then. Nothing is more satisfying than breaking down a whole pig and turning it into delicious cured meats and sausages. I'm quite happy making a wide range of products but there's one thing that I just can't get right. Fresh Spanish cooking chorizo, in particular I want to try and recreate this wonderful stuff from Brindisa http://www.brindisa.com/store/fresh-chorizo-and-morcilla/all-fresh-chorizo-and-morcilla/brindisa-chorizo-picante/
      They're wonderfully red, juicy and packed with deep pimenton flavour. Now when I make them I can get the flavour right but the texture is all wrong, very mealy, not at all juicy and the colour loses it's vibrancy too easily. What's the secret to them I wonder? Some kind of additive and/or food colouring?
      My recipe sees me mincing 2.3 kg fatty pork shoulder through a fine die, mixing with 80g pimenton, 50g salt, 30g sugar, 35g fresh garlic and stuffing into sheep casings. Here's a photo of them:

      I rest them overnight in the fridge before cooking with them. Maybe I should be putting some curing salt in there and hanging them for a couple of days? Does anyone have any experience making this kind of juicy fresh Spanish chorizo or even chistorra?
    • By milla
      For mid-May in all categories.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...