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Rice pudding


Stephanie Brim
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I've made rice pudding twice in 24 hours now. So homey in a I-have-way-too-much-rice-and-need-to-use-it-up kind of a way.

I realized that I've never made rice pudding completely from scratch for my husband last night while I was thinking about how many rice dishes I'm going to be able to make with the 5 pounds of Jasmine I bought this weekend. I decided to surprise him when he got home with a yummy treat: pudding made not from leftover rice but from raw. It's the way I prefer it so that the flavor of the pudding is actually well infused into the rice. It's also a good way to make sure that the rice doesn't get *too* mushy as I like a little bit of texture.

Today I redid it with measurements so that I could actually see what I was doing. 1/2 cup rice, 2 1/4 cups 2% milk, 4 tabelspoons vanilla sugar, 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon, 1/2 teaspoon salt. Place in pan, stir a little, bring to simmer, turn heat to low, cook until rice is the proper texture and the mixture is thickened considerably. This took 40 minutes or so of slow, slow cooking. The resulting pudding was very tasty, though next time raisins and butter will probably be involved.

Hubby has requested that I keep it on hand for breakfast.

What do you do for rice pudding? I'm thinking that, if we're going to end up using it as a breakfast food, I should explore other flavors than cinnamon raisin. Maybe pumpkin? Vanilla almond? Savory spinach and parmesan? Black pepper and honey? White chocolate and raspberry?

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I tend to use short grain rice for mine. 1/3 cup sugar 1/3 cup rice and 4 cups of milk. After 2 hours I add raisins for the last hour. Then temper in 2 eggs at the end. Sprinkle with nutmeg.

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You know, this thread on rice pudding bouncing to the forefront at the same time as the current crock pot thread reminds me that I used to make rice pudding in my crock pot all the time.

Here's a very typical recipe:

Crock Pot Rice Pudding

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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My family (of Norwegian descent) always has risengrynsgrøt (rice pudding) during the holidays. For a shamefully long time I thought that all families had this dish during the holidays. That obviously wasn't so.

Anyhow...my grandmother passed away and there was a break from that tradition, and my mother tried to make the pudding but never got it down right. But several years ago I found this recipe from Food & Wine for a Moroccan rice pudding.

http://www.foodandwine.com/recipes/moroccan-rice-pudding-with-toasted-almonds

I cut back the sugar and don't add the flower water or almonds. Instead I use real Ceylon cinnamon (a milder flavor) to top it off while cold. It isn't the same as my grandmother's, but I must say that the double boiling process similar and the arborio rice gave it a richness that was much better than long grain rice she used to use. I also think it would be very possible to eliminate the sugar and make this more of a savory dish -- but I have yet to try that. I'm not a huge fan of really sweet rice pudding.

I've served this during the holidays several times now and my family thinks it is just as good as the old country dish (just a little bit different) -- the main difference is that it is not served hot, but the cold version also keeps longer and better in the fridge. It's a new tradition that tastes very similar, but just as good.

During the summer I also have added fresh berries to rice pudding.

Edited by mr drinkie (log)

I like to say things and eat stuff.

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I sometimes make chocolate brown rice pudding for breakfast. It's dense in texture, not super sweet, and very chocolatey.

Cook 1/2 cup short grain brown rice in 1 cup water as per usual. To the pot, add:

1 quart whole milk

1/2 cup excellent cocoa

1/2 - 2/3 cup sugar

1/2 tsp espresso powder

1 tsp salt

Cook at a simmer until quite thick. You can ignore it early, but must stir frequently at the end. Stir in a slug of vanilla, and kahlua if you like. A handful of chopped chocolate and/or dried cherries stirred in once the pudding has cooled does not go amiss. Nor does a sprinkling of toasted almonds on top when serving.

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I sometimes make chocolate brown rice pudding for breakfast. It's dense in texture, not super sweet, and very chocolatey.

Cook 1/2 cup short grain brown rice in 1 cup water as per usual. To the pot, add:

1 quart whole milk

1/2 cup excellent cocoa

1/2 - 2/3 cup sugar

1/2 tsp espresso powder

1 tsp salt

Cook at a simmer until quite thick. You can ignore it early, but must stir frequently at the end. Stir in a slug of vanilla, and kahlua if you like. A handful of chopped chocolate and/or dried cherries stirred in once the pudding has cooled does not go amiss. Nor does a sprinkling of toasted almonds on top when serving.

Kahlua for breakfast?

sorry, I just have a question. I don't understand the first line of the recipe. Are you saying cook the rice, then use the cooked rice for the pudding?

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Kaluha is an important part of a balanced breakfast.

Oddly enough, I often make rice pudding for breakfast too as a way to add an alternate grain to my oatmeal and muesli routine. I've tried cardamon and lemon zest, but never anise before.

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How about using Indonesian black rice and coconut milk/cream along with vanilla pods and some soft brown sugar? The rice is super healthy and glutinous so it makes delicious rice pudding and it looks amazing!

Kalhua sounds odd to me too, but now you've got me thinking about making a rice pudding equivalent of a white Russian cocktail, or is that just a step too far?

Edited by Zacky (log)
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I love banana rice pudding - add nutmeg and cinnamon too. You can either add the banana while cooking so it cooks and infuses or just add chopped at the end. Also add in some chopped walnuts & honey/maple syrup - great for breakfast.

The possibilities for breakfast rice pudding/porridge is endless:

Apple & cinnamon

Pear & ginger

Berries & chocolate (either chocolate chips or cocoa/protein powder)

Almonds & citrus

Raisins & nuts

Dates & almonds

Prunes & pecans

Apricots & pistachios

Chai tea infused rice pudding with honey (infuse some tea and add to the cooking)

Add a dollop of fresh ricotta, yogurt or cottage cheese on top too

You can even make an "eggy" rice pudding made with egg custard so it sets and cooked in the oven. Makes a nice change!

Melbourne, Australia

'One cannot think well, love well, sleep well, if one has not dined well.' ~Virginia Woolf

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Different types of rice behave differently in pudding.

I have some Madagascar Pink Rice ordered from Lotus Foods. It's only available in 11 pound bags but I have used a lot of it.

It produces a beautiful pink rice pudding but it works best if it has a prolonged soaking prior to cooking. I soak it overnight in cold water, rinse and soak again for an hour or so before transferring to the rice cooker.

I've made pudding with black rice, purple rice and other heirloom rices.

I like rice puddings made with short grain rice, sticky rice and with Carnaroli rice, the latter made just like risotto, only with a sweet instead of savory flavoring.

It works great with fruits, especially mango, even canned mango puree.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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I discovered champorado (Filipino chocolate rice porridge) earlier this year. I love it. I think the next time I try it, I'll do it with coconut milk. And while the recipe calls for glutinous rice, I used brown last time and it worked fine.

Recipe I use is here: http://www.food52.com/recipes/3055_champorado_chocolate_rice_porridge

Edited by kayb (log)

Don't ask. Eat it.

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sorry, I just have a question. I don't understand the first line of the recipe. Are you saying cook the rice, then use the cooked rice for the pudding?

Yes, I cook the rice, and then used the cooked rice for the pudding. Since it is brown rice, I cook it in water to be absolutely sure it fully softens. Then I proceed with the rest of the pudding in the same pot.

How about using Indonesian black rice and coconut milk/cream along with vanilla pods and some soft brown sugar? The rice is super healthy and glutinous so it makes delicious rice pudding and it looks amazing!

Kalhua sounds odd to me too, but now you've got me thinking about making a rice pudding equivalent of a white Russian cocktail, or is that just a step too far?

I have made coconut milk and Thai purple sticky rice pudding, and that does make a lovely breakfast. Particularly with mangoes on top.

When I add Kahlua, it's about 2 teaspoons - I'm using it like vanilla extract. But I think a white Russian rice pudding sounds incredible! I wonder if more alcohol would affect the cooking of the pudding. I am guessing not, since the wine added to a risotto doesn't seem to adversely affect it.

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I have to throw in my vote for coconut milk and "glutinous" rice pudding. Unbelievably delicious, incredibly easy, and uses ingredients I have on hand almost always. Don't even need spices of any kind. Rice, sugar, water, cook until pudding-like, then mix with coconut milk and a pinch of salt.

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