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Short Ribs


Tim Dolan
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Well I figure that by shocking them and bringing the interior back to fridge temps when you brown the outside to get the crust that your want by the time you're done and rested the center has only been warmed back to that original temperature of 60c. This is my technique when doing this dish at an off site party. I can brown all sides wrap in foil to rest and when I carve it's nice and warm, the done-ness on the interior of the meat is perfect.

Sleep, bike, cook, feed, repeat...

Chef Facebook HQ Menlo Park, CA

My eGullet Foodblog

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As far as 3 minutes deep fry vs. torch: I've got a blazing hot MAPP torch, but haven't been too happy with the results so far. It seems to burn the surface irregularities before really browning anything. Perhaps I need to refine my technique.

MAPP burns extremely hot, and might not be the best choice. Also, it often has odorants added to it so that you can smell it, which can damage the taste of food. Propane might be the better choice for the kitchen.

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As far as 3 minutes deep fry vs. torch: I've got a blazing hot MAPP torch, but haven't been too happy with the results so far. It seems to burn the surface irregularities before really browning anything. Perhaps I need to refine my technique.

MAPP burns extremely hot, and might not be the best choice. Also, it often has odorants added to it so that you can smell it, which can damage the taste of food. Propane might be the better choice for the kitchen.

I haven't noted any off odors, but it sure does burn hot. I was browning off some SV chicken breasts last week in an aluminum-foil lined baking pan using the torch. The torch burned right through the foil, even though the flame was only hitting the chicken. Next time I'll just put them in a cast iron pan for torching...

BTW, on the massive Sous Vide thread, Nathan M. recommends MAPP gas (post 3539). I've found his guidance to be pretty good so far.

Edited by Borgstrom (log)
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  • 1 year later...

A while ago, I had a great soup at a restaurant here -- "short rib and caramelized onion soup." It tasted like a cross between French onion soup and braised short ribs. I decided to give it a try a few days ago; although I couldn't find a recipe online I figured I could come up with something close. I started by browning the short ribs (bone in) and a small onion, then deglazing with sherry. I added beef broth, some thyme and black pepper and cooked in my pressure cooker for about 75 minutes. Meanwhile I caramelized a couple of very large onions. When the beef was done, I took the ribs out and strained and defatted the sauce. I shredded the meat and added it with the caramelized onions back to the sauce. Mine was less like a soup and more like a stew than the restaurant version, but I was very pleased with the result. I'll do this again.

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Borgstrom and Scotty Boy, what did you do with the bones and fat? Yours look lean and boneless (and delicious), much like the superb short ribs I had recently at Central in DC. Every time I've made them at home (braised conventionally), they've been very fatty, even after braising, and of course, with a bone.

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My ex is Korean. She and her family used to run our Korean restaurant for several years. Our son got a recipe for Kalbi from his uncle and modified it until he was satisfied with the results. He made this recipe last June on the BBQ. We had some LA cut spare ribs (3 to 4 section bones) and also cut some traditional spare ribs that I cut into long strips. He thinks the traditional one bone kind makes the better ribs.

this isn't the best picture but was the only one I could find just now.

DSCF2941.jpg

Son made his recipe for kalbi, I grilled some bok choy, rice cooker made the rice and the restaurant down the street made the kimchee.

Kalbi

1/2 C. soy sauce

8 T. sugar

5 T. water

4 T. sherry

3 T. corn syrup

1 T. minced garlic

1/2 tsp. grated ginger

1/2 C. sesame oil

juice of 1 lime

juice of 1 orange

chopped green onion

pinch of pepper

Marinate overnight, grill medium heat until done.

Edited by Norm Matthews (log)
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Borgstrom and Scotty Boy, what did you do with the bones and fat? Yours look lean and boneless (and delicious), much like the superb short ribs I had recently at Central in DC. Every time I've made them at home (braised conventionally), they've been very fatty, even after braising, and of course, with a bone.

I usually get my short ribs from Costco, and they come boneless and pretty well-trimmed.

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I made the Momofuku short ribs for dinner last night. They were bagged on Wednesday with 1/2 cup of the marinade and went in to the sous vide cooker thursday morning for 48 hours at 55C. Saturday noon I shocked them and held in the refrigerator until service. About 3 minutes in the fryer and they came out nicely crisp and medium rare inside. I always make a double batch of the marinade and reduce the balance to about 25% until it is very thick. This is used to smear the plate and finish plating. They always come out great with many compliments. Sorry, no pictures.

I buy boneless short ribs at Restaurant Depot.

Paul Eggermann

Vice President, Secretary and webmaster

Les Marmitons of New Jersey

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