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Les desserts qui me font craquer


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A fine one too.

He claims they are all possible to bake and assemble in the kitchen.

This is a bit more elaborate then C'est du Gateau".

CM won the 2005 world pastry cup as well as wrote the hit ( fFrance) pastry cookbook "C'est du Gateau"in '07.

You'll also see a glimpse or two of him in the upcoming documentary "Kings of Pastry".

Also available from Amazon.fr

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They are brand new, the PH book isn't out until oct , early oct, I think.

I brought the 1st Michalak book when I was in France in early '07 and I sstill love it.

I'm not fluent in any way what so ever although because I spent so much time with Spanish Pastry books (Los Postre de El Bulli) translating the best I could . the French ones seemed much easier,I've also spent a lot of time in France.' Macaron', by Pierre Herme, because of the repetetiveness of the recipes ( the steps, not the material) really spelled it out. But PH10, Herme's last BIG volume, was formidible.

I would say, if you're a pastry chef,a working pastry chef, you shouldn't be without these.

Just components of recipes with some flavor changes or as they are , take you into another world.

In the US , I find very little I can depend on recipe wise or that I'm excited by.

Dorie Greenspan, Kate Zuckerman are solid, Pichet Ong and Johnny Iuzzini solid and for ideas.

Like I said, "Infinement" isn't out until10/28/2010.

Michalaks book is out now and I would imagine it would be fun.

As far as a collector type of pastry book freak, you can't beat these types of books nor the Spanish equivalents.

I have cooked from all of the books I have and that's how I decide in the future what is going to be a good bet for me.

Sadly, I've found many dessert oriented books that are from the US not to be very useful to a person like myself.

The best was/is a Richard Leach book called the "Four Seasons", I think?

Mainly for components.

Kitchen arts and letters may have some copies of that as well as Amazon used.

I find if you're not weighing your ingredients you're basically playing Russian Roullette/ wasting your time.

That's why unless there's a horrible typo ( which they're sometimes are) I feel Euro books are generally the biz.

Good Luck!

On Sun, Sep 26, 2010 at 1:46 PM, eG Forums <no-reply@egullet.org> wrote:

tan319,

janeer has just posted a reply to "Les desserts qui me font craquer":

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Told you I didn't speak French.

I know Spanish very well, though, and I can puzzle my way through a lot of written French as a consequence. Have you actually cooked from either of these books? Are they must-haves? I am a pastry book freak.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

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I would say, if you're a pastry chef,a working pastry chef, you shouldn't be without these.

Just components of recipes with some flavor changes or as they are , take you into another world.

In the US , I find very little I can depend on recipe wise or that I'm excited by.

Dorie Greenspan, Kate Zuckerman are solid, Pichet Ong and Johnny Iuzzini solid and for ideas.

...

The best was/is a Richard Leach book called the "Four Seasons", I think?

...

I find if you're not weighing your ingredients you're basically playing Russian Roullette/ wasting your time.

That's why unless there's a horrible typo ( which they're sometimes are) I feel Euro books are generally the biz.

On Sun, Sep 26, 2010 at 1:46 PM, eG Forums <no-reply@egullet.org> wrote:

tan319,

---------------------------------------------------------------------

First, thank you for the detailed response; very helpful to benefit from your experience about what is worthwhile. Amazon has a Spanish version of PH10 (a few hundred dollars). That might be worth having.

Alas, I am a professor, not a pastry chef, although I do have a culinary degree and have always been most interested in, and happiest doing, pastry. Of course I weigh everything. I totally agree with you about American books; if you are a professional, these books, even by professional pastry chefs, are aimed at home cooks and so it is not surprising they don't do much for you. Sherry Yard's is one of the better of those, I think, and I like Andrew MacLauchlan's Tropical Desserts. The Leach (called Sweet Seasons) is on Amazon and I will try it. And I will borrow a copy of c'est du gateau through interlibrary loan and see if I can follow it before buying. When someone uses/enjoys a book over a long period, that is always a good recommendation. I feel that way about Lenotre--classic, nothing earth shaking, but wholly reliable and correct.

thanks again

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Thanks for the kind words.

Yesterday I neglected Ms. yard and also Elizabeth Faulkner as great chefs who have written some great books that not only explain how things work and why but have great recipes too.

I''m surprised at the number of chefs ( not pastry ) who literally phoned their books in)

Good luck on PH10.

That's a heavy hit!

Is the Euro worth about 1.25/1.30 right now?

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