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Chris Amirault

Best Cookbooks for Sous Vide/LTLT Cooking

24 posts in this topic

I thought we could put together a list of cookbooks that are useful resources for sous vide/long time, low temperature cooking.

A few are dedicated to SV/LTLT cooking. There's Sous Vide Cuisine by Joan Roca & Salvador Brugues (Amazon link here; eG Forums topic here). There's Under Pressure by Thomas Keller (Amazon link here; eG Forums topic here). There's Society member Douglas Baldwin's Sous Vide for the Home Cook. Soon, we'll have Society member Nathan Myhrvold's epic Modernist Cuisine (eG Forums topic here; Amazon link here).

Then there are cookbooks that aren't dedicated to SV/LTLT cooking but use the technique, such as Society member Grant Achatz's Alinea cookbook and Michel Richard's Happy in the Kitchen.

Are there others out there that you turn to when you fire up your Auber, rice cooker, or SV Supreme?


Chris Amirault

camirault@eGstaff.org

eG Ethics Signatory

Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

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The Ideas in Food cookbook that is coming out in December might have some info on sous-vide. I'm basing that on having read the blog rather than having any confirmation of the contents. Anyone know for certain?

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I suppose it's a bit like having a cookbook dedicated to one type of cooking (eg frying). There are not many books devoted to a single style of cooking but many that use it as part of the repertoire of techniques that are used.

As sous vide cooking has become more mainstream, we're seeing more recipes using sous vide as a normal cooking process.

Jordi Crux's book Logical Cuisine is one such book. Most proteins in the book are cooked sous vide. Is it a book on sous vide cooking? Not really. Does it have many sous vide recipes? Yes, it does. Equally, books by restaurant chefs that are not dumbed down (think The Fat Duck cookbook) also use sous vide processes.


Nick Reynolds, aka "nickrey"

"My doctor told me to stop having intimate dinners for four.
Unless there are three other people." Orson Welles
My eG Foodblog

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I don't think books for certain types of cooking are that rare. Soups, bbq, crock pot, baking, sushi, ceviche, etc. Food and Wine mag just came out with a feature article on sous vide with recipes. Features the Sous Vide Supreme.

I've got Cooking For Geeks. Not really a cook book, for sous vide or any other type of cooking. Just pop science.

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Really, I think almost any cookbook can contribute something that can be twisted to sv -- particularly if it references cooking to a specified internal temperature, rather than by time or by qualitative or visual description. There are actually internal temperatures mentioned in Mastering the Art of French Cooking - kudos for being SO far ahead of the rest at that time!

I'm going to make a prediction: - this is the next battle to be fought with cookbook editors after the weight measures struggle is won.

"You are trying to cook, and you tell me that you don't even have a thermometer? Well, really!"


"If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch ... you must first invent the universe." - Carl Sagan

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We have just finished writing 'At home with sous vide' the latest hard cover dedicated to sous vide cooking and the first to come out of Australia. At home with sous vide available from the 1st of December 2013. Contributed recipes from some of the worlds great sous vide chefs and bloggers.


Dale Prentice
Director at SousVide Australia
Http://sousvideaustralia.com

President - Australian Culinary Federation - Victoria Chapter

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We have just finished writing 'At home with sous vide' the latest hard cover dedicated to sous vide cooking and the first to come out of Australia. At home with sous vide available from the 1st of December 2013. Contributed recipes from some of the worlds great sous vide chefs and bloggers.

Looks good. Will it be available in Europe bookstores? Amazon?

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We have just finished writing 'At home with sous vide' the latest hard cover dedicated to sous vide cooking and the first to come out of Australia. At home with sous vide available from the 1st of December 2013. Contributed recipes from some of the worlds great sous vide chefs and bloggers.

Looks good. Will it be available in Europe bookstores? Amazon?

Not yet, if you know a cookbook store or sous vide importer in Europe that deals in specialty cookbooks I would love to talk to them.

I will post when it is here in hard copy about three time and we will take it from there.


Dale Prentice
Director at SousVide Australia
Http://sousvideaustralia.com

President - Australian Culinary Federation - Victoria Chapter

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We have just finished writing 'At home with sous vide' the latest hard cover dedicated to sous vide cooking and the first to come out of Australia. At home with sous vide available from the 1st of December 2013. Contributed recipes from some of the worlds great sous vide chefs and bloggers.

Looks good. Will it be available in Europe bookstores? Amazon?

Not yet, if you know a cookbook store or sous vide importer in Europe that deals in specialty cookbooks I would love to talk to them.

I will post when it is here in hard copy about three time and we will take it from there.

What will be the price for the book in Australia ?

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Dale's book is out.

The link for it is here. It is A$69.95. The book is hardcover, 223 pages and covers sous vide cooking from basics up to some quite advanced restaurant dishes.

After an introductory chapter on cooking with sous vide, he covers cooking of five different classes of food: eggs, poultry & game, meat, fish, and fruit & vegetables.

From my experience, the times and temperatures given are appropriate and well within accepted safety guidelines.

The basics are covered well and recipes are clear and concise. They are accompanied by pictures showing plating of the dishes.

Dale is a trained and very experienced chef who moved into selling sous vide equipment after adopting it in his own kitchen many years ago.

He has sourced recipes from 36 other chefs as well as presenting his own take on a number of dishes.

This is possibly the first book to bridge the gap between a simple presentation of sous vide cooking (eg. Douglas Baldwin and Jason Lodgson's books) and the restaurant books that can verge into the complex. He does it well and the involvement of a range of chefs allows you to see their different approaches to using this cooking medium.

I enjoyed browsing through the book and will use a number of techniques from the book in my own cooking.

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Nick Reynolds, aka "nickrey"

"My doctor told me to stop having intimate dinners for four.
Unless there are three other people." Orson Welles
My eG Foodblog

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How do the recipes translate to the US? If you are able to answer that.

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As we represent PolyScience in Australia I was mindful that we may have USA reader of our book. We have all of the measurements in metric and temperatures as C/F

I hope this helps, I also assume the text has an Australian accent but only our customers could tell you that.


Dale Prentice
Director at SousVide Australia
Http://sousvideaustralia.com

President - Australian Culinary Federation - Victoria Chapter

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I'm good with metric and C. More curious about the availability of the various ingredients.

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Probably the only thing you won't be able to find is Pademelon, which is a kind of small kangaroo. I'm Australian and I'd never heard of it either. The recipe says to substitute kangaroo but you could just as easily substitute venison for a very similar texture and flavour profile.

The book has recipes from all around the world, including ones from Nathan Myhrvold, Wylie Dufresene, J. Kenji-Lopez-Alt, Brad Farmerie, and so on. I don't think you'd be either frustrated in not having availability of ingredients nor disappointed.

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Nick Reynolds, aka "nickrey"

"My doctor told me to stop having intimate dinners for four.
Unless there are three other people." Orson Welles
My eG Foodblog

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Dale's book had two reviews on Amazon before it became unavailable. Might we hope to see At Home with Sous Vide again? 


Edited by Batard (log)

"There's nothing like a pork belly to steady the nerves."

Fergus Henderson

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Dale's book had two reviews on Amazon before it became unavailable. Might we hope to see At Home with Sous Vide again? 

Hi Batard, it is on Amozon here http://www.amazon.com/Home-Sous-Vide-Dale-Prentice/dp/0987526324 please let me know if it appears unavailble somewhere and I will see if I can fix it or remove that listing.


Dale Prentice
Director at SousVide Australia
Http://sousvideaustralia.com

President - Australian Culinary Federation - Victoria Chapter

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The price of $90 seems a bit high for a such book. It would be nice to have at least a chance to have some kind of preview and/or some serious reviews

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The price of $90 seems a bit high for a such book. It would be nice to have at least a chance to have some kind of preview and/or some serious reviews

But that is not an Amazon.com price. That is a reseller price and the book is coming from Australia. In other words Amazon.com is not offering this book. At least that is the way I am reading it.


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Never call a stomach a tummy without good reason.” William Strunk Jr., The Elements of Style

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

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But that is not an Amazon.com price. That is a reseller price and the book is coming from Australia. In other words Amazon.com is not offering this book. At least that is the way I am reading it.

Yes that is right, the price includes the $27 postage as Amazon only includes $3 postage and this does not cover airpost from Australia. We are not big enough to ship it to Amazon for them to redistribute.
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Dale Prentice
Director at SousVide Australia
Http://sousvideaustralia.com

President - Australian Culinary Federation - Victoria Chapter

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I'd really like to own this book, but it's hard for me to swallow the $27.00 shipping fee. But I hope it does very well, and will soon have a USA distribution point. Thanks very much. 


"There's nothing like a pork belly to steady the nerves."

Fergus Henderson

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Dale's book is one of the better SV books I have.  It has a good instructional section and lots of interesting recipes including some from guest chefs.  It is illustrated with good quality colour photography (unlike most SV books) and I have cooked several recipes from it with success.

 

I understand the reservation of adding $27 postage, but if you can overlook that it is a good book which is easy to recommend.

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Has anyone seen/used the British book on sous vide by Alex Shannon and Chris Holland? If so, please share your thoughts. It is self published by a company that makes Sous Vide equipment and hence tends to push some of that equipment especially the Smoking Gun. Despite this shortcoming I find it an interesting read.

It is available on Amazon.com and is called Sous Vide - The Art of Precision Cooking.


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Never call a stomach a tummy without good reason.” William Strunk Jr., The Elements of Style

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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