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rob7

Ingredients- what to use if given a choice?

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This weekend I'll be making cinnamon buns using Reinhart's recipe from The Bread Baker's Apprentice.

In the recipe there are a few options for ingredients and I'm wondering if using one ingredient over another will produce better results. Or, if the results may be different, but not necessarily better or worse, what are those differences?

First choice is the fat. The recipe calls for either shortening, butter, or margarine.

Lemon extract or zest? I would think that the only downside of zest is possibly having some pieces remain.

Whole milk, buttermilk, or powedered milk? Buttermilk will give it a slight tanginess I would imagine, but is there a difference between using powedered or whole milk?

Finally, the recipe calls for AP flour or bread flour. I know in breads, the higher protein and gluten or bread flour is desired for structure and texture, but, with cinnamon buns, I would think that one would want a dough that is more tender which would be better provided by the AP flour....or, does it not even make much of a difference given the amount of fat in the dough?

Thanks for any isights and knowledge you can share.

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I don't have the recipe in question, but here are my general observations:

First choice is the fat. The recipe calls for either shortening, butter, or margarine.

In a yeasted dough, the flavor will be different; no real effect on texture.

Lemon extract or zest? I would think that the only downside of zest is possibly having some pieces remain.

I *hate* the taste of lemon extract; I think it bears NO resemblance to real lemon zest. However, if you wish a commercial bakery flavor, the extract will provide it.

Whole milk, buttermilk, or powedered milk? Buttermilk will give it a slight tanginess I would imagine, but is there a difference between using powedered or whole milk?

Powdered milk generally gives a lighter, higher rising dough.

Finally, the recipe calls for AP flour or bread flour. I know in breads, the higher protein and gluten or bread flour is desired for structure and texture, but, with cinnamon buns, I would think that one would want a dough that is more tender which would be better provided by the AP flour....or, does it not even make much of a difference given the amount of fat in the dough?

As you suspect, the fat will encourage a tender dough with either BF or APF.

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On using milk in yeast products.

A long time ago I read that using powdered milk was a good thing.

It seems that fresh milk can inhibit the yeast culture,

Since that time I have always had a can of milk powder handy.

Powdered milk is the way to go.


Martial.2,500 Years ago:

If pale beans bubble for you in a red earthenware pot, you can often decline the dinners of sumptuous hosts.

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I *hate* the taste of lemon extract; I think it bears NO resemblance to real lemon zest. However, if you wish a commercial bakery flavor, the extract will provide it.

I'm with you on that...I was hesitant to say the same myself as I wasn't sure if there just possibly may be a lemon extract out there that gives a real lemon flavor rather than a fake lemon candy type flavor.

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No need to worry about bits of lemon zest if you use a microplane. If you don't have one yet it's a worthwhile investment. If you whisk it into the sugar before adding, the sugar crystals cut the zest and bring out more of the natural oils.

Flour, I think it depends where you live. Here in Canada our flour has a higher protein content so I'd use all-purpose, in the US I'd probably use bread flour. For the best flavour I'd use unsalted butter and make sure there was salt in the recipe.

A tip I learned on King Arthur Flour is to brush milk on the dough instead of butter before sprinkling with sugar and cinnamon. The protein in the milk binds it to bun so it all stays together instead of the layers opening up when it cools, as they usually do. Depends on the look you want.


Don't wait for extraordinary opportunities. Seize common occasions and make them great. Orison Swett Marden

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Buttermilk usually has a higher fat content--typically 3.5-4% vs the regualr 2% of gallon-jug milk.

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I have made this recipe. I use dried milk, a mixture of butter for flavor and shortening for tenderness, and neither zest nor extract (though I would use zest if one or the other, grated with a microplane as indicated above. I use a-p flour for this.

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Buttermilk usually has a higher fat content--typically 3.5-4% vs the regualr 2% of gallon-jug milk.

Interesting, that's not at all true where I live. The only buttermilk I have access to is low-fat, 1% I believe. I've never seen a "whole milk" buttermilk.


Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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I use butter and a little bit of almond extract in the dough. I prefer that to lemon, though I know there are people who swear by the recipe as written. I tend to use whole milk, scalded, in the dough, though I have put in a little cream or some half and half if I have some that needs using up and I don't plan to frost the rolls.

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I like bread flour for cinnamon buns. I think it makes an easier dough to work with while filling and rolling.

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