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Impossible to find kosher ingredients


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Some kosher items are hard to find, others are hard to know if they even exist. Let's use this topic to help find kosher ingredients (or find out if they're even out there).

I'll start.

Fish sauce

Bison (anybody ever see it in Canada?)

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Do I win a prize? :laugh:

http://www.imofood.com/index.php?categoryId=9325

A touch of ImoFood's Kosher Fish sauce will definitely spice up your Thai and Vietnamese dishes.

tracey

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Places in New York that do mail order might be your best bet. Google Lekvar By The Barrel to get their web site. I remember as a kid on the East Coast having Taiglach as a treat. I have never seen it on the West Coast but I'll bet you can get it in NY.

'A person's integrity is never more tested than when he has power over a voiceless creature.' A C Grayling.

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Kosher bison is not difficult to find, though I have not seen it in Canada. I don't think the bison guy at SNFM is kosher.

It's easier to find in the US - I've even had samples from South Dakota. But it's impossible to find in Canada. No meat at the SNFM is kosher -- there's no kosher local slaughter or any animal.

My gratitude? :biggrin: Now to see if I can actually get it . . . Thank you!

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Places in New York that do mail order might be your best bet. Google Lekvar By The Barrel to get their web site. I remember as a kid on the East Coast having Taiglach as a treat. I have never seen it on the West Coast but I'll bet you can get it in NY.

Just so happens we have a topic on taiglachright here in the forums. It even has a recipe -- maybe you want to try making them?

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Pam, I buy the nam pla from Koshergourmetmart.com. They have it sporadically, but if you register for the web site, they'll send you an email when they get in a shipment. They carry a lot of ingredients for the Asian kitchen.

Another option is to find someone traveling to Israel. A friend of mine has her in-laws bring it when they come visit.

Edited by bloviatrix (log)

"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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Hi Pam,

Believe it or not, I have the recipe for Taiglech in the original "Gourmet Cookbook." It is the only book in which I have ever seen the recipe. I made some close to 40 years ago. The kitchen was a mess afterwards and I never made them again. Delicious though. :rolleyes:

I'm diabetic now so it wouldn't be a good idea. They're addictive.

Best,

Hank

'A person's integrity is never more tested than when he has power over a voiceless creature.' A C Grayling.

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The salient feature of kosher fish sauce is that it contains no shellfish or other un-kosher fish. So it tends to be made with 100% anchovies. That, and it is made under rabbinic supervision. I know of one restaurant -- not a kosher restaurant -- that uses kosher fish sauce because it offers the assurance that it won't be problematic for customers with shellfish allergies.

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A few impossible ingredients that I want...

Bonito - flaked or whole.

Champagne and Sherry vinegars

Quality aged balsamic vinegar

Wide rice noodle

Quail and Pheasant

"Salt is born of the purest of parents: the sun and the sea." --Pythagoras.

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  • 5 weeks later...

(Finally coming out from under Rosh Hashana here . .)

Pam, I buy the nam pla from Koshergourmetmart.com. They have it sporadically, but if you register for the web site, they'll send you an email when they get in a shipment. They carry a lot of ingredients for the Asian kitchen.

Thanks for the idea! I just sent them a tweet and asked if they have any in stock. I stock a lot of Asian ingredients here - I want them myself and we also do "Asian Take-Out" once a month or so in the store.

I know of one restaurant -- not a kosher restaurant -- that uses kosher fish sauce because it offers the assurance that it won't be problematic for customers with shellfish allergies.

Any idea what the brand is?

Champagne and Sherry vinegars

Me too! It would be nice to have some more vinegar options.

Wide rice noodle

My supply chain is sporadic, but I've been able to get wide rice noodles (wide=for Pad Thai wide). I'm not sure which brand, but it might have been Taste of Asia. Will re-order next week and see if they arrive.

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Real Mexican cheeses? I have no idea. For a while Les Petite Fermieres had Asadero available -- and "Quesadilla". They're still on a wholesale list I have, but I don't see them on their website.

As for turkey bacon, I'd like to know too. It's so strange that something that's so available in the treif market but could be made kosher isn't. We get some decent beef bacon / beef fry, but turkey would be great.

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  • 2 months later...
  • 1 month later...

Good news everyone. Taza Chocolate, including their Mexican chocolates, are now certified by OU. I have a wheel in my kitchen, now to find a good mole or other use for it!

Dan

"Salt is born of the purest of parents: the sun and the sea." --Pythagoras.

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