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Fondant recipes


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hi would anyone have a fool proof recipe for making fondant at home.Where I live its not readily available unless one orders from a bakery and they arent very keen to provide it. Also I live in a very hot /humid country. would that effect the end result in home made fondant?

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Wilton Cream of Tartar Fondant

2 cups (480mL) hot water, 6 cups granulated sugar, 1/2 tsp cream of tartar.

Combine water and sugar in heavy 4 quart saucepan. Place pan on high heat and add cream of tartar. when mixture boils, wash down sides. Clip on thermometer, wash sides down 2 more times. Do not stir. When temp reaches 240 F (116 C)remove pan from heat and pour on cookie sheet or prepared slab so you can cool down the mixture. Entire cookingtime should be about 10 minutes or less.

When mixture cool then work the fondant with a metal scraper. The recipe says it should become stiff in about 5 minutes. Then you can knead the fondant until soft and creamy.

What I do after the fondant cools slightly, I put it in my bosch mix master with a dough hook and let the machine knead the dough. I keep the lid off to let any heat escape. Using the machine is much easier than hand kneading and table slabbing.

Store air tight or put in the refrigerator. But keep it airtight!

Eddy Van Damme has an excellent website and he has a fondant recipe posted with pictures to walk a person thru the process.

http://www.chefeddy.com/2010/02/fondant/

Chef Eddy lives in Houston which is hot and humid so I don't think it will be too much of an issue for you.

Edited by prairiegirl (log)
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Do you mean the liquid glaze kind (like you might find on top of a bun or mille feuille, or the firm sculpting kind used in cake decorating?

Prariegirl's link to the Chef Eddy site is very good if you want the poured kind. If you are interested in a rolled fondant, you could try googling Marshmallow Fondant. It is the only type I have tried to make and it worked well... and as a bonus, it tastes like marshmallows, which is a step up from a lot of the unpleasant fondants I have tasted in the past which I immediately peel off.

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If you are looking for rolled fondant, The Cake Bible by Rose Levy Beranbaum has recipes for both plain and chocolate rolled fondant (she also has a recipe for poured fondant in there too); Kerry Vincent's wedding cake book also has a recipe in it

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...

What I do after the fondant cools slightly, I put it in my bosch mix master with a dough hook and let the machine knead the dough. I keep the lid off to let any heat escape. Using the machine is much easier than hand kneading and table slabbing.

Store air tight or put in the refrigerator. But keep it airtight!

Eddy Van Damme has an excellent website and he has a fondant recipe posted with pictures to walk a person thru the process.

http://www.chefeddy.com/2010/02/fondant/

Chef Eddy lives in Houston which is hot and humid so I don't think it will be too much of an issue for you.

And I'm impressed with the Eddy Van Damme suggestion of using a food processor!

It certainly is possible to use a marble slab to pour the syrup on and then to crystallize it, but a food processor makes this super easy.

And yes, he is using Cream of Tarter to partially invert the sugar and thus make a 'soft' (not for rolling) fondant. (Where the humidity question might be less relevant, I believe.)

"If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch ... you must first invent the universe." - Carl Sagan

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And I'm impressed with the Eddy Van Damme suggestion of using a food processor!

I was too... until I did it. They must have better processors than I do 'cause that was a mess. The processor motor was struggling and I lost quite a bit because I got tired of trying to scrape it off of everything.

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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I've used the kitchen-aid to beat it with good success - but these days I just buy it in 30 lb pails.

Remember you can make it once - then the next time just make a bob syrup and add some of your previous batch to seed - no beating required.

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And I'm impressed with the Eddy Van Damme suggestion of using a food processor!

I was too... until I did it. They must have better processors than I do 'cause that was a mess. The processor motor was struggling and I lost quite a bit because I got tired of trying to scrape it off of everything.

Thanks for that warning!

I was thinking that the dough blade (short arms to limit torque) might be the thing to try for a first attempt!

I've used the kitchen-aid to beat it with good success - but these days I just buy it in 30 lb pails.

Remember you can make it once - then the next time just make a bob syrup and add some of your previous batch to seed - no beating required.

Sorry Kerry, English-English speaking n00b here! What would a "bob syrup" be, please?

I'm wondering if that would be a good approach to making multiple small quantities of differently flavoured fondant? {Thinking here of different flavours in the syrup portions, then seed with plain ... ?)

And are there any tricks I ought to know about handling/controlling the sticky mess of soft fondant? (Please feel free to provide links rather than detailed explanations!) For 'cream-centred' moulded chocolates, I was envisaging a disposable piping bag (and maybe oiled scissors?)

Edited by dougal (log)

"If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch ... you must first invent the universe." - Carl Sagan

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A bob syrup is where you take the syrup to the same temperature that you would when making fondant - and instead of beating it when it cools - you add 'old' fondant to it. The crystals in the 'old' fondant seed the syrup in the right way and allow the kind of small fine crystals that you want to be produced to form.

A good book for the theory of fondant and bob syrups in particular is "Making Chocolates" by Alec Leaver. It's an oldy but goody. Ignore the way he makes invertase and just buy some.

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i just honestly use mm fondant for my quick fondant needs. im from philippines and yes it can get quite hot here. super easy you can finish in less than 15mins. take 16oz mini marshmallows, 8cups of 10x, 3-4tbsp h20 and 1/2c more 10x for dusting. youll need a large microwavable container, a kitchen aid with dough hook attachment and a good stable table and some wooden spoons and rubber scraper. place the mm in the container without cover, pour the 3tbsp h2o around it, you dont have to stir it at all just drizzle it over. pop it in the microwave and on high settings, heat it for 1min 3x, stirring around for every minute. it should one big gooey blob after, sometimes i like to heat it again for 30secs or so if im not confident everything is melted right. brush some shortening to the bottom and sides of the KA bwol, place half of the 10x in it (btw i use the large KA, if you have the smaller one, cut the recipe to 3/4), pour the melted marshmallow and mix at speed 1 until everything comes toghether (i normally cover my mixer with cling wrap so the 10x wont explode everywhere). when you see it all mixed up nicely, turn to speed 2 and let it have a go at it for about 3mins. then lower to speed 1 and spoon the remaining 10x, looking and touching and feeling it as you go til you finish the 10x. NOTE: you dont always have to finish the 10x, thats why you poke at it, if its getting too hard or dry stop or drizzle some h20 on it again, use drops), let it mix for awhile but not too much as your mixer will be working very hard by this time. turn it off, scrape everything on a 10x dusted surface and start kneading by hand for a minute or 2. with some practice you should be able to gauge who you want your fondant to be at all times. if im wrapping a cake with it i normally have it a bit softer than the usual to avoid cracks but if its for figures, i knead and add a bit more 10x and soem tylose (be careful with the tylose, you dont want to end up with a fondant brick). hope that helps in some way.

Edited by hac (log)

Desserts...just keeps getting better and fatter!

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...

A good book for the theory of fondant and bob syrups in particular is "Making Chocolates" by Alec Leaver. It's an oldy but goody. Ignore the way he makes invertase and just buy some.

On the basis of your recommendation, I have just laid out almost $7 (US) including transatlantic postage.

I trust it'll be worthwhile! :biggrin:

"If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch ... you must first invent the universe." - Carl Sagan

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...

A good book for the theory of fondant and bob syrups in particular is "Making Chocolates" by Alec Leaver. It's an oldy but goody. Ignore the way he makes invertase and just buy some.

On the basis of your recommendation, I have just laid out almost $7 (US) including transatlantic postage.

I trust it'll be worthwhile! :biggrin:

Indeed - it is an inexpensive book. I pick up every copy I see!

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  • 3 months later...

So, I made fondant yesterday (based on Grewlings recipe) and it turned out rock hard. I was aiming for a soft fondant, so didnt wait until it reached 117 degrees. This is not the first time I've made fondant, but I realised that I wasn't agitating it enough because usually I would stop once it became opaque, but it would still be runny. So this time I kept going. Now it's solid. I wet my hands and took a tiny amount and worked it in my hands and it did become more pliable. Should I continue and do that with all of it? Or will it have an adverse effect like it will develop mold or something?

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So, I made fondant yesterday (based on Grewlings recipe) and it turned out rock hard. I was aiming for a soft fondant, so didnt wait until it reached 117 degrees. This is not the first time I've made fondant, but I realised that I wasn't agitating it enough because usually I would stop once it became opaque, but it would still be runny. So this time I kept going. Now it's solid. I wet my hands and took a tiny amount and worked it in my hands and it did become more pliable. Should I continue and do that with all of it? Or will it have an adverse effect like it will develop mold or something?

It's OK to work it to make it more pliable. If you have some invertase I'd knead in a bit and then when the fillings are in the mold (or enrobed) they will soften further.

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