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nickrey

EatYourBooks.com: search your own cookbooks for recipes online

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3 hours ago, PassionateAmateur said:

It's especially handy for cocktail books.  When you're in the mood for something new involving Green Chartreuse...

I agree, although I wish they had even more cocktail books indexed.

 

If you need more ideas with Chartreuse, make sure to take a look at this as well! :)

 

 

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Just a reminder, if you're a member of Eat Your Books, do check their regular cookbook giveaways.  I recently won a copy of Carolyn Phillips' book All Under Heaven.  I got a notification email on Saturday and received the book today - nice!

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I just joined. I'm not home tonight so I will not be able to add much to my library but I am looking forward to using this tool.

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When I enter a book to add to my bookshelf and it hasn't been indexed, what happens if I request EYB to index it?

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They must index books with lots of requests.  So just wait and when it is indexed you get an email.  Or, you can do it yourself but that process doesn't have much appeal to me.

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Not quite sure about something.

 

I haven't entered very many books yet. One that I did enter was the Fannie Farmer Cookbook. I entered the ISBN code for my wife's copy and it brought up a different edition. I was looking to find a simple recipe for carrots. One choice was Fanniie Farmer's Baked Carrots. It listed carrots and thyme as the ingredients. When I pulled out the cookbook it had 8 ingredients. Not quite the simple carrot dish I was looking for.

 

How realiable have others here found the ingredients lists to be reliable?

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Just now, Porthos said:

Not quite sure about something.

 

I haven't entered very many books yet. One that I did enter was the Fannie Farmer Cookbook. I entered the ISBN code for my wife's copy and it brought up a different edition. I was looking to find a simple recipe for carrots. One choice was Fanniie Farmer's Baked Carrots. It listed carrots and thyme as the ingredients. When I pulled out the cookbook it had 8 ingredients. Not quite the simple carrot dish I was looking for.

 

How realiable have others here found the ingredients lists to be reliable?

Very reliable. But keep in mind that basic pantry items (salt, pepper, sugar, etc) are typically not included.

Also, they are very quick to make corrections if you report mistakes. Just send them an error report by email!


Edited by FrogPrincesse (log)
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The baked carrots recipe ingredient list in the book includes carrots, butter, chopped onion, sugar, thyme, salt, pepper, chicken stock. Chicken stock, butter and onions are in other lists so I'm thinking that this particular recipe's incomplete list must be an anomaly.


Edited by Porthos (log)

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Just now, Porthos said:

The baked carrots recipe ingredient list in the book includes carrots, butter, chopped onion, sugar, thyme, salt, pepper, chicken stock. Chicken stock, butter and onions are in other lists so I'm thinking that this particular recipe's incomplete list must be an anomaly.

 

It depends on the amount used. I linked to the rules. I was an indexer so I had to refer to them all the time! :)

 

http://support.eatyourbooks.com/customer/portal/articles/1034887-store-cupboard-ingredients-table

 

 

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Thank you, @FrogPrincesse.

 

Based upon the rules I can see that I will not always be able to use EYB for same-day cooking.  For instance, I don't keep lemons in my kitchen; I buy them as needed. And Dijon mustard, well let's just say that I call the popular brand "Grey Poop" and it will never be found in my pantry.

 

That being said, seeing this list is very helpful.

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I don't use a "recipe" for my chicken pasta salad since I like to mix things up. I used EYB today to look at pasta salads in my cookbooks just to see what ingredients went into those recipes. I had never thought of adding grated Parmesan cheese. I wanted a veggie and broccoli jumped out at me. The one thing I always have to have are black olives. I decided to add pimentos for color. Made for a tasty salad. As usual I cooked the chicken SV.

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Host's note: this discussion began in the Crazy Good e-Book Bargains topic.

 

On 11/3/2017 at 11:39 AM, Anna N said:

There is!  It’s called Eat Your Books!  

 

Now you have me pricing barcode scanners.

 

I don't suppose there is any way to automatically import a Kindle library?

 


Edited by Smithy Added host's note (log)

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3 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

Now you have me pricing barcode scanners.

 

I don't suppose there is any way to automatically import a Kindle library?

 

 Not that I know of. I do a search for the book and then just add it to my own library.   I had a scanner at one time but it was incredibly slow and not always accurate so I gave that up. I am wondering if you can have more than one library so that you could separate your kindle books from your hard covers. I don’t think it’s possible it might be something to suggest the EYB people. 


Edited by Anna N (log)

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13 minutes ago, Anna N said:

 Not that I know of. I do a search for the book and then just add it to my own library.   I had a scanner at one time but it was incredibly slow and not always accurate so I gave that up. I am wondering if you can have more than one library so that you could separate your kindle books from your hard covers. I don’t think it’s possible it might be something to suggest the EYB people. 

 

 

Why would you want your Kindle cookbooks separate from hard cover ones?

 

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6 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

Why would you want your Kindle cookbooks separate from hard cover ones?

 

 

I would want all my cookbooks in one searchable location but I might want the ability to search for recipes that are only in my Kindle books (for example, when I'm traveling with my iPad and am asked to cook).

This can be done in EYB by tagging the Kindle books with a bookmark and then choosing that bookmark when searching.  

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1 hour ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

Why would you want your Kindle cookbooks separate from hard cover ones?

 

 Some of my hard cover books are no longer easily accessible to me. 

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1 hour ago, Anna N said:

 Not that I know of. I do a search for the book and then just add it to my own library.   I had a scanner at one time but it was incredibly slow and not always accurate so I gave that up. I am wondering if you can have more than one library so that you could separate your kindle books from your hard covers. I don’t think it’s possible it might be something to suggest the EYB people. 

 

 

Rather than buy a scanner, I looked for an iPad app.  I downloaded a free app called Scandit.  It asked for the type of barcode I wished to scan.  I selected 1D retail barcode.

 

Then I turned over the copy of Imbibe! I keep handy on the desk.  While I was about to start trying to figure out how to read the barcode, the book popped up on the screen -- as well as where I could buy it or borrow from a library.  Quite impressed I was.

 

This leaves the question of how to export the information to something like Eat Your Books.  There may be some way to get Kindle to export also.  Another possibility might be getting the book information from your amazon digital orders page?

 

Any suggestions would be appreciated.

 

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Just now, Anna N said:

 Some of my hard cover books are no longer easily accessible to me. 

 

Sorry, that makes perfect sense.

 

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I have run into a wrinkle:  I just made a batch of white sauce and for a test I typed it into EYB.  Not surprisingly EYB found "white sauce" in Joy of Cooking.  But why can't they tell me the page number??  Is there a trick to this?

 

What's worse Joy of Cooking (6th edition, in this case) has no index entry for white sauce.  If you look up Béchamel they say "see white sauce".  But the index has no entry for white sauce.  Presently I have no way to contact Irma Rombauer.  As a spoiler the recipe may be found under "sauce, white".  Not that I need a recipe for white sauce.  Nor an index should I want find the Joy of Cooking white sauce recipe*.

 

But for $30 why couldn't EYB have told me this?

 

 

*which in the 6th edition is on page 341.

 

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3 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

I have run into a wrinkle:  I just made a batch of white sauce and for a test I typed it into EYB.  Not surprisingly EYB found "white sauce" in Joy of Cooking.  But why can't they tell me the page number??

 

From the EYB FAQ:

Quote

Why are there no page numbers?

We recently reversed our decision not to include Page Numbers. We originally felt that as many cookbooks have different editions, hardcover, paperback, anniversary editions, etc, any of the linked editions would not be correct. However, as most cookbooks only ever have one edition and there were so many requests from members to include page numbers, we feel that for most people it is beneficial to have them included. If you own a linked book (the book is indexed from a master edition and all other versions are linked to it), then you may need to refer to the index to get the correct page number.

We are working through previously indexed books to update them - if you would like to volunteer to add page numbers to any books you own, please let us know.  

 

In the case of the Joy of Cooking, the EYB listing for 6th edition that you mention shows 42 linked ISBNs (hardback, paper, spiral-bound, published in the US or UK, etc.) Not sure if they are going to try and tackle all of them!

 

3 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

What's worse Joy of Cooking (6th edition, in this case) has no index entry for white sauce.

 

Interesting.  My copy of Joy does have an index entry for white sauces, directing me to pages 322, 323.  

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9 hours ago, blue_dolphin said:

 

From the EYB FAQ:

 

In the case of the Joy of Cooking, the EYB listing for 6th edition that you mention shows 42 linked ISBNs (hardback, paper, spiral-bound, published in the US or UK, etc.) Not sure if they are going to try and tackle all of them!

 

 

Interesting.  My copy of Joy does have an index entry for white sauces, directing me to pages 322, 323.  

 

Realizing there were many different editions I entered the book by ISBN.  I just checked a different printing and there was no white sauce either...white sausage, yes.

 

Thank you for the information on EYB page numbers.

 

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For entering my Kindle library I went to my digital orders page on amazon.  I clicked on each title, then went to the print edition listing and copied the book's ISBN into a text file.  I pasted the text file into EYB.  This worked.  I couldn't think of an easier way.  I suppose I could have directly pasted each ISBN into EYB but I was afraid of losing all my work.

 

Then I spent the rest of the afternoon entering hardbound and paperbacks.

 

To the test!  Tonight I plan to make stuffing.  I already know I intend to try Kenji's recipe (more or less) but I wanted to see what EYB might suggest for "stuffing":  there were 1028 results.  I'm not sure this was helpful.  Then I tried "bread stuffing".  This time I got 189 results.  Kenji's stuffing was buried on screen 6 but it was there, and I was even given the page number.  The correct page number even.  Page 622 of The Food Lab for those following along at home.

 

Apparently a lot of EYB entries do include page numbers.  Another mystery.

 

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