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Chris Hennes

"Fine Chocolates 3" by J. P. Wybauw

26 posts in this topic

I just noticed on amazon.com that Wybauw has a third book coming out in his Fine Chocolates series. Anyone know anything about it? Its subtitle is "How They Last Longer and Taste Stronger" so presumably it will discuss things like water activity, etc. The amazon description says

A new edition of the best-selling 'Fine Chocolates'.

but it doesn't look like just a "new edition" based on the cover.


Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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This is the first I've heard of it - but, count me in on the pre-order - his stuff is amazing...

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He indicated in a class last summer that he was going to put out another book, this time about shelf life. He said in would be out early in 2010. The way publishing happens this is early in 2010!


Mark

www.roseconfections.com

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Has anyone received this book?

I can't find it on Amazon anymore...

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Amazon UK is showing the publication date as 20th December which seems a very odd date to release a book so I wonder if this was just a case of adding another couple of months to the original UK date until something more accurate was announced.

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Got mine ordered through a bookstore that specializes in cookbooks hre in Vancouver. Have promises that it will be here by the end of the month.

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I don't want to put a dampner on spirits but I recently bought a copy of the re-printed Patisseries of Pierre Herme. It was originally scheduled for release Dece 09/Jan 10 and I was buying from a specialty cook book store who were in direct contact with the publishers. I eventually got the book in July. The book store owner reckons this is quite common with high-end pastry/cook books.

That said, I hope the book is released ASAP because I have his others and am sure I'll get this one as well!! :biggrin:


Edited by gap (log)

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Just got a second email today from amazon:

Greetings from Amazon.com.

We are sorry to report that the following item is no longer available from our supplier:

'Fine Chocolates 3: How They Last Longer and Taste Stronger'

However, we have learned that a substitute is available under a different item number. You may link directly to the product details page for the substitute item using the URL below:

Substitute: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/9020990209

The unavailable item has been cancelled from your order. If you would like to purchase the substitute item, please visit our web site to place a new order.

We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience. Thank you for shopping at Amazon.com.

Sincerely,

Customer Service Department

Amazon.com

The new substitute item is slightly higher in price than the original guaranteed pre order price.

WHat should be done?!

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very odd. I wrote to the customer service and they are willing to give me the original pre order price. Wow, I saved myself a few dollars!!! Silly I know!

here is the response:

Thank you for writing to us at Amazon.com.

I am sorry to know that the item you had most awaited for has been canceled. I can certainly understand your feelings in this issue.

Unfortunately, when we contacted our supplier, we learned that Fine Chocolates 3: How They Last Longer and Taste Stronger is no longer available. Therefore, this item has been canceled from your order.

At this time it is not possible to view canceled orders in your account and your credit card has not been charged for this order. Also, we are unable to reinstate an order that has been canceled.

Please go ahead and place an order for the substitute item "Fine Chocolates Volume 3 [Hardcover]" suggested by us and write back with the order number using the link given below. We will honor the original product's pre order price ($59.85).

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The book has been released internally at Callebaut (JPW is a Callebaut mensch) and has been given to a few top professionals...I first saw it when judging at a recent World Chocolate Masters event. It looks very good indeed and will be released for general distribution probably just before or just after Christmas.

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That would explain why my chocolate wholesaler (UK) now has it as available on their website; they sell a lot of Callebaut chocolate so presumably have been sent a suply of the books. Their price is also less than the one currently on Amazon UK.

Lapin

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I received my copy this morning via HB Ingredients, my chocolate supplier and they are charging UK £42 with a 3% discount if ordered online but their minimum order for free delivery is £200. For once I had my timing right and needed to order my chocolate for christmas so getting up to the free delivery total was possible.

The book has a lot of reference/technical information with the first 67 pages written on technical aspects of sugars, emulsifiers, spoilage of products and approaches to balancing ganache recipes.

Then the recipes which are divided into 2 major sections: Fat Based and Fat & Water Based.

'Fat Based' overs chocolate spreads and nut pastes, so now I can make my own nutella!

'Fat & Water' is sub divided into Truffle shells, Cutting Pralines, Moulded Pralines and Other Techniques.

There are some beautiful ideas for decorating your chocolates often as using ordinary kitchen equipment such as crinkle vegetable cutters, straws, cooling racks and also lots of elegant piping.

Some of the recipe 'flavours' look familiar (but reworked to get better shelf life)and he does in places cross reference his other books which could be a bit frustrating if you do not have them.

He seems to be adding salt more often too. I rarely add any additional salt to my ganaches but I do usually work with salted butter. Maltodextrin is also used quite a lot as well as sorbitol and glycerol.

Looking forward to getting started on this book.

Lapin

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Thanks so much for insider info!!! I am now glad I ordered the book. I received another mail from amazon that the order has been delayed once again. Annoying as now it comes in Dec and so my chances :angry: to get it via someone's suitcase has disappeared.

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....patience ladys...

If you order it from Callebaut direct you will be able to buy it for a lot less than over chocolate distributors/book shops/amazon etc.

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I just received a notice from Amazon that it has shipped. Yippee!!


Ruth Kendrick

Chocolot
Artisan Chocolates and Toffees
www.chocolot.com

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surprise surprise! Mine arrived as well and just in time! It will go into a suitcase and get to me in less than a week. What luck. The chocolate gods love me perhaps after all!yay!

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How do I get this from callebaut?

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JR, hold on to your money for a bit....

I have the book and I feel an alternative title for the book would be "You can't have your cake AND eat it too".

As with all of Wybauw's books, it is very well written and full of top-notch information. Yet to get the shelf life you need to sacrifice something and use glycerin, sorbitol, and other "weird" sugars. I don't know about you, but I have to declare my ingredients on my lables, and I am not comfortable with stating glycerin or sugars that--if consumed in excess--will promote, uh..."loose bowels".

My other beef with the book that all of the informtion could be printed on less than 80 pages, much of the book is full of glossy full page pics. Beautiful pics to be sure, but I am NOT in the market for another coffee table book and feel somewhat cheated with over 150 pages of pics.

See if you can find a friend or a library/bookstore that has a copy, have a peek, and then decide if you want to buy it.

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See if you can find a friend or a library/bookstore that has a copy, have a peek, and then decide if you want to buy it.

I'm kind of embarrassed to admit it on a website full of people much more competent than me, but a friend is starting a bakery, and wants me to work there doing truffles and confection. (To be fair, I'm cheap. And much, much better at some of the other tasks required.)

After having a batch of (not production-appropriate) cayenne truffles go fungal after just two weeks, I'm not questioning to shell out the cash.

Any chance you'd sell your copy? The library doesn't go in for $70 cookbooks...

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Not sure if you are already aware of this but the book is currently available at Amazon.

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