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We moved house a few years ago and I boxed my book collection to relocate them to a prime spot in the refurbished house. Its still unfinished but through one hallway Pierre Koffmanns book Memories of Gascony has peeked through the cardboard box tempting me on a number of occasions to try some more of the recipes.Its now twenty years old and the recipes are timeless.

I bought some trotters a while back but never got around to making his famed Pieds De Cochon Aux Morilles, hopeful that one day I would be able to sit in his restaurant and have the man himself cook them for me.

That time had arrived.

Housed in the part of The Berkeley where Vong once was, I remembered walking down the stairs into the basement room as though it were yesterday. Jean-Georges Vongerichen was the star man when he hit town and we had a fantastic meal there.

Smiley, Happy Greeting from a multitude of staff including Mr K's bubbly Partner Claire.

Fantastic booth table looking towards the open kitchen with flashing glimpses of the main man.

We were offered an amuse of Rabbit Terrine on Baggette which I forgot to snap.

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The menu reads very well with three dishes "Pour Deux", Cote De Boeuf, Poulet Noir and Saint Pierre (John Dory).

Poissons from a choice of six include,Lobster, Skate, Sea Bass, the usual suspects really.

Entrees include my choice the famous Pigs Trotter, Lamb, Beef Cheeks, etc, from a choice of eight.

I must also mention the extremely good value lunch, two course for £18, or three for £22.50.

You lucky, lucky, locals.

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Bread was an assortment from the hotel as I understand, and it was not as good as I had expected, but rest assured Koffmanns own baker (arriving soon) will correct that. Butter was very good and with the right amount of salt.

Potted Foie Gras (£14) was the Lady's choice and it was as smooth as silk, quite a big rich portion with a quite wonderful jelly topping. Imagine sitting in a French field (or a posh restaurant for that matter :biggrin: ) full of fragrant flowers,having a picnic on a sunny day, fresh bagette, great company, get the picture?

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Eleven in the kitchen including Mr K, but no head chef as yet. Tim Payne was supposed to be in charge,( don't ask I don't know :smile: ) but I am reliably informed very good chef ( and fresh from Heston,s, Hinds Head ) Clive Dixon is soon to be installed.

Note my Escargots waiting to be served.

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My Cassolette D Escargots Et Girolles A L'Ail (£12) were served in a Le Crueset Pot with a heavily (nice) garlic laced buttered slice of bagette. I did not ask if said snails were from France, I sort of assumed they were from Hereford as most seem to be from there.Quite punchy flavours and real comfort food, a larger portion would keep most people happy on its own.

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Next up the Pied De Cochon (£27),and I simply don't know why I have not tried this before. Its been on Marco Pierre Whites menus, Shaun Hills menus etc, but I may have been a bit too wimpy to jump in. Lets face it folks its not going to win any beauty contests. However this ugly bug has a scintilating personality.

Not the wordsmith I wish I was its hard to sum up the level of enjoyment this dish offered. I imagined it to be an aquired taste and hard work. It was niether it was a triumph to the tastebuds. Said Porker must have been a baby judging by the size of it on the plate. It is very rich and moreish and certainly a winter dish. Still with five chefs prepping eighty at a time this is never going to disappear from this menu.

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The other main was Lapin Roti A La Moutarde (£20) A stonking stuffed Rabbit dish of generous proportion. I could have devoured this myself, it was just so "of the moment". Broad beans,baby Girolles, Artichoke and a trio of Cherry vine Tomatoes completed the picture.

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A most welcome selection of vegetables were presented in the form of buttery Chantenais Carrots, some too al dente Suger Snaps, and some absolutely delish Pomme Frites, easily as good as the excellent ones we ate at Bar Boulud. They were cutely presented in a cone of Le Monde newspaper.

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We were too full to take a dessert each so we shared some Marinated Cherries with Fromage Fraise, NAGE DE CERISES ET FROMAGE FRAISE (£9) The cherries were from France and marinated in their own juices and flecked with chopped pistachios. I personally think this dish was a bit too simple and needed a bit of alchohol to help it forward. Still pleasant enough though.

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Petit fours were Orange Chocolate Macaroons, Coffee Profiteroles, and Apricot Jellies, one of which my wife ate before I could take the photo.

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We did not take cheese, but the board looked very tempting and even though it was quite dark I attempted a photograph, so please be understanding again, as no flash was used.

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In the next booth to ours egulleter and super informed Bloomberg food critic Richard Vines was dining with Bruno Loubet and their glamorous ladies. I did not trouble them but as they exited the kitchen after offering good wishes to Pierre Koffmann, Richard kindly stopped bye to say hello. It was good to meet up at last.

I wanted to get a photograph of Pierre in the kitchen, but I was mindfull he had a busy schedule and did not want to trouble him. He was busy prepping trotters, but Claire came to the rescue and took a couple of snaps on my behalf.

Note the massive scallops, to the left of the picture.

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Currently I can not think of any better way of spending a Saturday afternoon, a long lazy lunch in comfortable surroundings, with like minded people, cosseted by super staff and cooking by a true legend.

Meal for two including a good bottle of wine, no coffees, tap water £123, but you can enjoy the place for considerably less, in fact a lot less.

"So many places, so little time"

http://londoncalling...blogspot.co.uk/

@d_goodfellow1

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Wonderful report, thank you. I am thinking that this needs to be part of my next (yet unplanned) visit to London. Looks like a fantastic value, too. And those scallops...how were they on the menu, did you notice?


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Wonderful report, thank you. I am thinking that this needs to be part of my next (yet unplanned) visit to London. Looks like a fantastic value, too. And those scallops...how were they on the menu, did you notice?

Hi Linda, and thank you.

You can not go wrong dining here,we loved it. Indeed if you are dining in London this area is the place to be, with incredible choices.

Also at The Berkeley is two Michelin star Marcus Waring's restaurant. Across the road is Bar Boulud and Heston Blumenthal is opening there later this year. If you are rich of course you could stay at The Berkeley or The Mandarin Oriental or the fabulous Lanesborough, (which houses Aspleys) etc, etc. perhaps a local egulleter may offer you a bed, you never know your luck :laugh:

The following restaurants are mostly Michelin starred and within easy walking distance, Zafferano,(italian) Amaya,(indian) Nahm,(thai) Aspleys,(italian) Gordon Ramsays new Petrus,(modern french) and Racine (french) I have dined at most of these and can vouch for the quality.

This area is currently my favorite. The lunch options are terrific for quality, value, and location, and if I lived here I would become very plump indeed.

The scallop dish, Coquilles St Jacques A L'Encre, is one of Pierre Koffmanns famous signiture dishes, its "Scallops with Squid ink" sold as a starter @ £16 or a main @ £28. I have not eaten it yet, but I have time on my side. :smile:

Happy eating.

"So many places, so little time"

http://londoncalling...blogspot.co.uk/

@d_goodfellow1

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The scallop dish, Coquilles St Jacques A L'Encre, is one of Pierre Koffmanns famous signiture dishes, its "Scallops with Squid ink" sold as a starter @ £16 or a main @ £28. I have not eaten it yet, but I have time on my side. :smile:

Oh my. I must try this. If other members have tasted this dish, I'd love to hear.

When in London I stay with friends and so like to take them out for a celebratory thank you dinner. I was there in February for a long weekend but we stuck with family-friendly places when eating out, not wanting to leave their 10 yr old behind. But I know where we're eating when I visit next.


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  • 1 month later...

Linda, I read this review and thought of you, as the description has me licking my lips in anticipation.

Great review! On the scallops:

...My only problem is how to get all the intense sticky sauce into my mouth without licking the plate...

oh my. My London friends are visting me in the states soon, I'll start discussing my return visit.


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Dare I venture a contrary opinion? Is it possible to criticise Koffmann’s without being declared apostate?

But my lunch there yesterday failed the “So What?” test. (It definitely, however, passed the “How Much?!!” test).

I went with high hopes, having eaten once at Tante Claire in its final days, having heard the buzz around the Selfridges pop-up, and having read the rave reviews. I went too, understanding PK to be a living God, progenitor of a whole generation who have transformed cooking in this country over the last 20 years. Here was the man who changed London’s perceptions of what constituted culinary accomplishment, presenting cooking which had terroir, as well as panache.

I was a believer…

And yet, my meal was not just flawed, but, worse still, forgettable.

A terrine of leeks with smoked eel. The terrine was fridge-cold and under-seasoned. The accompanying micro-salad was fiercely over-seasoned. Three moderate flakes of eel and, on the side, some candied cashews of exactly the type they provide as nibbles in the bar. I mean, what? Was it too much effort to plate a hazelnut or two for the salad?

The “legendary” pigs trotter. Oh dear. Labelled as being with morels and sweetbreads and chicken mousseline, I don’t think I found a single morel in mine. And, frankly (and sadly) the mousseline and sweetbreads competed for bland anonymity. The boning of the trotter was also a bit slapdash (as was the boning of Jo’s rabbit). I remember this dish – not at Koffmann’s – but carried on by Jean-Christophe Novelli at his peak. It was sensational. And so, so different from this imitation.

Ouefs a la Neige. Fine. Deeply flavoured custard but the addition of crumbled “Crunchie Bar” honeycomb underneath just felt of a bit clunky intrusion, and unnecessary given the delicacy of the caramel ‘cap’ to the meringue.

None of it was bad, of course. The service was excellent. A decent wine. But the whole concept seemed to be falling between two stools. It lacked the gutsiness of a bistro; and it lacked the care, attention and refined concentration of the Michelin original. But One Star Michelin prices were being charged so I’m not inclined to give it the benefit of the doubt.

A shame, a real shame. Not least because the menu reads so gorgeously, and as simple and as of the place as ever it did back in Tante Claire. You want it to work. But it didn’t. Not badly, just blandly. Koffmann’s is a tribute band and, I’m afraid, for the price of admission, better and more characterful cooking can currently be found elsewhere.

What can I say; my experience just didn’t square up with the reviews. But, then again, this is the West, sir. When the legend becomes fact, print the legend.

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I must concur with Gareth about the pigs trotter, as when I ate there a couple of weeks ago not a single morrel in mine either, one tiny sliver in my companions, and the sauce seemed to provide most of the flavor. Of the starters the snails were good but the scalops with squid ink a bit bland overall forgetable but what was outstanding this was the pistachio souffle for desert.

Time flies like an arrow, fruit flies like a banana.

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Labelled as being with morels and sweetbreads and chicken mousseline, I don’t think I found a single morel in mine.

Did you bring this up with the management at the time? It seems to me if it states " morels" it has to contain them or its a breach of the Trades Descriptions Act.

not a single morrel in mine either,

Same again really, if its advertised, it should be provided.

I had no complains about my meal thankfully, however I am sure Mr K would like to rid his kitchen of any inconsistancy.

I wonder if Clive Dixon (new chef) has taken up his position yet.

"So many places, so little time"

http://londoncalling...blogspot.co.uk/

@d_goodfellow1

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  • 3 months later...

Just thought to give this thread a "bump" as Koffmanns is mentioned on the Michelin 2011 thread on here.

Nickloman and a few others (above) report quality issues. Could this be down to having two head chefs leaving in fairly quick succession? Not being able to find the right man for the job perhaps?

Anyone been recently who can report on their meal?

Be most interested from the "man in the street" point of view, as lots of top chefs seem to love it.

"So many places, so little time"

http://londoncalling...blogspot.co.uk/

@d_goodfellow1

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We went several months back.

Late (9.30) on a Friday.

We had to wait about 25 minutes for our table which wasn't a major problem as we were enjoying chatting with the barman and trying out some of the aperitifs (Floc de gascogne and pousse rapiere, if my memory serves me correctly). We ate that late due to circumstance but I do prefer to eat earlier, particularly big meals as I find my appetite will wane much past 10pm.

Room is anonymously decorated, table was rather exposed, right in the middle and too close to other diners.

Starters were OK. Mine: snails, mushrooms, garlic and mashed potato was a nicely balanced melange of comforting flavours, a tad underseasoned. Nearly very good. I remember the bread was excellent. Crab with celeriac and apple was served with an impressive crab shell which was whipped off as a reveal and a nice touch, but the contents of the plate was pretty bland despite having a decent amount of crab meat.

I obviously had to sample the pigs trotter. Having read about this dish so many times (it being both Koffman and Marco Pierre White's signatures) my expectations were sky high. Unfortunately it underwhelmed majorly. Like Gareth's, mine was also not entirely unboned. The mousseline in the middle had very little flavour other than egg and had the consistency of a well done omelette. Morels and sweetbreads were hard to discern. The trotter was nice and sticky but needed a decent counterpoint that the filling couldn't offer. The sauce was rich and sticky. It came with far too many vegetables, including some extremely unimpressive, leaden mash. Much better were the fries.

Hannah had calves liver which was extremely dull and not prepped correctly, with plenty of tough sinew left on the piece we were served.

Pudding was ile flottante - a far far too sweet custard and meringue was rendered even sweeter by some unnecessary caramel.

We were saved from bitter disappointment by being shown one of the best cheese boards I have ever seen. I remember a perfect Vacherin particularly. As I usually do I ordered a bunch of French cheese I've never had before and consequently forgot the names. The lady serving the cheese demonstrated some great knowledge of her subject and I was very impressed with the way she approached the (often fraught for both customer and server) business of serving.

The bill with wine was something like £200 so I also was not happy to give this place the benefit of the doubt. Everything should have been perfect and only the cheese was.

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Dinner at Koffmann's last night. It was two days after Rasoi, four after a nice bistro in Brussels and six after Hibiscus, all experiences from satisfying to great food-wise, so high comparatives, and three stars, to match...

I've got to say that, within the category of food he has decided to produce -let's say high end bistro- it was an unbeatable meal. Great basic flavours of raw material unmasked and enhanced, a combination of heartiness and lightness, generosity, control.

We start very well with the bread: four varieties, rustic, well made.

The classic of scallops with 'encre' is so simple, but if you like scallops with ink, well, you cannot ask for more: it's a beautiful, subtle and light sweet-salty match, the scallops themselves just done inside, one second from burning outside, with a wonderful nutty hint.

Our other starter was more powerful, a pithivier of game. So many things could go wrong here: soggy pastry, dry meat...but once again it was cooked masterfully, the thyme jus (we think it was veal stock) made a real difference, made all the difference in fact, the pastry was exemplary, the meat moist, the flavours intense. In its genre, perfect.

For the stuffed rabbit, see David's comments above, whose sentiment I share entirely (just minor differences in presentation compared to his). Once again, a perfect dish in its genre.

Just one notch below, but still very, very satisfying and with the same generosity of portion, was a partridge with cabbage.

Side spiced carrots were crunchy and delicious; we were expecting more from the fries.

We loved the light touch with seasoning. There is gentleness and class in these gutsy dishes.

A baba' was ever so airy but I personally would have wanted less sugar and more alcohol: this was the only disappointment of the night. The pistachio souffle, another classic, was also very sweet but to scream for and, of course, perfectly executed.

We paid £160 including a £40 Madiran, a bottle of water, a coffee and the odious 12.5% service charge (Scotland is spoiling us in this respect). Petit four (Madeleins) are brought even if you don't have coffee.

We loved this place. It's relatively informal but not shabby, comfortable, service is relaxed and professional, prices are right (though already creeping up, better to hurry before the star arrives...) and, above all, based on this single experience, there is no question in our mind that Koffmann -who was in the kitchen- is a true master. If we still lived in London we would return again and again.

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Just a note to add that we were back for Sunday lunch to try the pig's trotters (we had to...). The other posters are right in saying that there is an issue with the morels. I looked up the recipe and it should be 5 per portion - well, in that case another table must have had 10 each...

Apart from this breach of the Trade Description Act, we found the dish very good, and the sauce and the consistency quite extraordinary (but we can't compare with Novelli's or any other reference point: we were trotter virgins).

PS: we would have liked to raise the morel issue with the staff, but the atmosphere and situation counselled against that on this occasion. Next time...

PPS: the great man was again slaving away at the stoves.

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I'd go back and give it another try .. if there was some way of knowing the man himself will be cooking. Perhaps if the Koffman team read this thread they can let me know what days he comes in :)

Every day, according to the young lady that I spoke to last week. But, I would check first, just to be on the safe side.

Apart from the "morel problem" things seem to have perked up quite a bit since your visit, certainly over the last two or three months.

"So many places, so little time"

http://londoncalling...blogspot.co.uk/

@d_goodfellow1

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I'm going to be back in the UK over Xmas (weather permitting).

I'll be staying just round the corner and Koffmanns looks like an ideal lunch spot. There's no sense of what the lunch menu contains, but I guess it's terrines and long braises. Is this a fair assumption?

Although Bar Bould has a more American focus, would you recommend Koffmanns over it?

thanks

Fergal

(www.foodmiles.wordpress.com)

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Hi Fergal,

when we went (it was a Sunday) the prix fix starters were quite varied. From memory, they featured items such as an octopus salad (which we had, very delicate), a terrine, a salad with Roquefort, and some fish. The mains were a grouse, a bean cassoulet with confit duck and hams (which we had, real brasserie food), some fish, and more. Most importantly, the desserts included the signature Pistachio souffle' (which is significantly more expensive than the rest on the regular carte). Anyway, the full carte is also available at lunchtime.

I haven't been at Bar Bouloud so I cannot compare the two. You might also walk a few steps East to sample Apsleys.

Enjoy your London stay.

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I did the two restaurants over successive days. I loved both but for different reasons. Bar Boulud much more low key and relaxed. Koffmann's was more fine dining; we did ALC but the prix fixe lunch is incredible value. I think Koffmann's is outstanding and would be my definite choice if it's either/or.

Adam

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We loved Bar Boulud. When we went it was busy and buzzy although the place is not fine dining, they just do what they do very,very well.

Comparing the two, we would rather return to Koffmanns first, as the menu(s) seems more refined. I would love to try the set menu because I think it would be a fantastic bargain, with some top quality dishes on it.

You could of course supplement that menu, with a little shared tasting of one of his signiture dishes, as we tend to do more often these days. We do sometimes skip or share a dessert, depending on portion size of course.

However, having said that, on our only visit here, we were well sated.

"So many places, so little time"

http://londoncalling...blogspot.co.uk/

@d_goodfellow1

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  • 6 months later...

To begin the meal we were given a little taster of thinly rolled flatbread the thickness of a poppadom with Smoked haddock brandade piped on top , just a little amusement to start the experience off nicely.

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The bread selection arrived and for a classic French chef we expected nothing other than perfection, and the bread met those levels perfectly.The white bread was freshly baked , warm , crispy and the best in the business.The brioche was multi layered and as light as a feather and as the photo shows , you simply cant improve on perfection.

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Our starter was recommended by Richard , he advised one of us to have the classic

Koffmann signature dish of Scallops with squids ink and cauliflower puree ( £16 ) and the other to have the squid bolognaise ( £10 ).Fresh squid thinly shaved horizontally with a very sharp knife and then cut up into delicate pasta like ribbons which were briefly cooked off and served with a bolognaise style tomato sauce….it was different and tasted wonderful.I didnt get a taste of the scallops as my dining partner wouldn`t

part with the tiniest morsel….so i take it they were good.Well actually i was offered his empty plate to mop up the squid ink sauce with my bread, i couldn`t resist …it was good.

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Next up we both had the “Cassolette d`escargots et champignons persilles” (Snails ,

mushrooms , garlic and parsley ) ( £12 ) .Served in a small cast iron lidded cocotte pot , we knew they were on the way before they arrived at the table , the smell of good food filled the restaurant.The base of the pot contained a very delicate mousseline of potato , very light in texture and topped with tiny chanterelle mushrooms and the roasted snails.A highly aromatic sauce of butter , garlic and fresh parsley was spooned over the snails and served with a side of crispy garlic bread. Every mouthful was a

“closed eyes moment”….a very memorable tasting experience .

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Now it was time for the legendary trotter and from its decription and what i had been reading about it i could almost re-create its flavour in my mouth.The trotter is firstly boned out and pot roasted in Veal jus with a selection of vegetables until the fat is broken down and meltingly succulent.This takes 3 to 4 hours.Basically the trotter serves as a casing for the mousse filling enclosed within.The filling is made from caramelised sweetbreads ,smokey morel mushrooms and held together with a chicken mousse.The trotter and filling is then wrapped up to re-shape it all in foil and allowed to set in the fridge.The next step is to roast it all off in the oven until it is cooked through and the filling is set.It is then unwrapped and bathed in more rich veal jus and sent to table.

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Its accompaniments are koffmanns classic pommes puree , the most velvety cream mashed potatoes known to man.Spirals of crunchy caramelised pork crackling crown the mash and thats all that is needed.

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Just to add value for money a selection of vegetables and a paper cone of chips fried in dripping come on the side.As for the trotter….Loin stirring , Heaven on a plate , meltingly tender, cut through with no effort , rich , sticky….very sticky , concentrated flavours , its just out of this world and i could immediately see what 25 years of fuss was all about and now while im sitting writing this at home , im just working out when i can return back to Koffmanns to eat it all again.Re-creating it at home just isnt a substitute on this occasion.

The cheese trolley arrived and it was just a case of a Little Britain - ”Want them all” , we were guided through all of the cheeses and little slivers were cut off for us to sample before we made our choice. After we had a taste of each one it was a “oh go on then , a wee bit of each” moment.We eventually decided to be sensible and opt for the best of the bunch.The cheese , as expected was mostly all French , perfectly matured and a good selection of the various types, soft, creamy , hard , goats……Fabulous.

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Richard the Maitre `D returned to see how we were , he already knew the answer as he simply told us “you dont need to speak as the smile says it all”…he was right. He had come to offer us a little break from the food at this point and to take us off into the magical kingdom and to meet all the chefs.Could this get any better ? The kitchen was all glass fronted so the diners could see the action inside.We went into the heart of the

machine to meet the head chef in Mr Koffmanns absence , his name just slips me now but he was a lovely guy , took us through all of the sections , hot starters , pastry , and mains.The kitchen was running like a well oiled machine , everyone smiling and the only miss was Chef Pierre himself ,apparently we had just missed him…fingers

crossed for next time.

Time for the sweets , and once again i had decided weeks ago that there was only one choice for me….Classic Lemon tart.( £9 ). The Koffmann signature dessert “Pistachio souffle” was heading up the menu and highly recommended but although no doubting that it would be wonderful , i dont really eat souffle in restaurants , too much of the same thing at every mouthful…just lots of flavoured air.The superstar chefs always say that there should be a classic lemon tart on the menu at every good restaurant , i have to agree.Back when Koffmann had his 3 stars at Le Tante claire it was always the mark of a good restaurant , Both Roux restaurants , Marco , Nico Ladenis , Anton Mosimann , Raymond Blanc…..they never had it off their menus.The Lemon tart came with Lemon sorbet and paired up with a nice glass of chilled Sauternes 2003 was a taste combination that i just didnt want to end….once again , i crave more.

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My dining companion opted for the creme brulee , unfortunately for him he didnt get his own way and was told “sorry sir , i have to insist you have the Oeuf a la neige caramelisee ( £9)…..” Ermmmmmm , okay ” it was a done thing.It also turned out to be a fine dessert as well.A huge scoop of sweet whisked egg meringue gently poached in flavoured milk , coated with crispy caramel and floating on an island of vanilla creme anglaise…He was happy.

Richard returned once again to kindly offer us time to let our food settle and then join the chefs for the “Trotter rolling” in their kitchen.A fantastic treat but unfortunately it was the end of our fun trip to London and the amazing food of Koffmann and a train to catch back to the Lake district, back to the reality of working in the real world again.

And for anyone who hasn`t experienced Koffmanns cuisine ,I cannot put it any straighter than this - It`s simply one of those things that should be on the list of “The top 100 things to do before you die”.

CumbriafoodieCumbriafoodie
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And for anyone who hasn`t experienced Koffmanns cuisine ,I cannot put it any straighter than this - It`s simply one of those things that should be on the list of “The top 100 things to do before you die”.

I am glad you liked it, I'm also a huge fan. There is a lot of joy in those dishes, the pure pleasure of putting something damn good in the plate, cooked with immense technique, but without the straightjacket of 'fine dining' rules of presentation etc. (last time we tried the roast chicken, another dish which is quite unique at that level - one has to allow 45 mins cooking time, giving the opportunity to sample several other nibbles in the meanwhile...).

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  • 3 months later...

Just had a email off Koffmanns.

They have a super offer of a free dessert of Croustade Aux Pommes with their Prix Fixe lunch menu.

So three courses at a superb restaurant in Knightsbridge for only £21.50.

Amazing value.

Its on until the end of November.

Koffmanns Offer

"So many places, so little time"

http://londoncalling...blogspot.co.uk/

@d_goodfellow1

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The trotter here is good -- but a shadow of how it was at La Tante Claire, or even at MPWs establishments.

When I had it, it was not as neatly done as in the photos above, and the farce was different -- much plainer, I don't think there were any morels or sweetbreads, could just have been a plain chicken mousse. Still good, and let the trotter shine out more.

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  • 1 month later...

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Finally made a rather belatedly visit to try out the lunch menu mentioned above.

The special November offer had finished, but the normal three course price of £26 (plus service charge) was more than decent value for silver service in a prime Knightsbridge location.

I need a bit of time to post the review as it takes me an age, but bear with me if you will.

"So many places, so little time"

http://londoncalling...blogspot.co.uk/

@d_goodfellow1

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